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GNOME 3.20 Officially Released (softpedia.com) 193

prisoninmate writes: After yet another six months of hard work, the highly anticipated GNOME 3.20 desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems has been officially released on March 23, 2016. Release highlights include support for operating system upgrades via GNOME Software, middle-click paste, kinetic scrolling, drag-and-drop support for Wayland, keyboard shortcuts and gestures overlay for most of the core apps, XDG-Apps technology for installing multiple versions of an app, and much more goodies.
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GNOME 3.20 Officially Released

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  • Best improvement (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @05:37PM (#51764695)

    Is it as good as Gnome 2 yet?

    • by iggymanz ( 596061 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @05:48PM (#51764775)

      Highly anticipated by all two remaining GNOME developers

      • do not forget the user. he gets lonely.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Is it as good as Gnome 2 yet?

      In my personal opinion, yes it is.

    • Drop support for what?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I wonder, have they discovered in gnome 3.x that real people need to open real applications on the same screen?

    • by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @06:29PM (#51765103) Homepage Journal

      I wonder, have they discovered in gnome 3.x that real people need to open real applications on the same screen?

      Or on multiple screens, for that matter.
      Or run the desktop environment in a window on a bigger screen (e.g. a VM).

      Relying on pointing devices not going past the edge of the screen takes a certain kind of talent.

      • by jonnyj ( 1011131 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @06:49PM (#51765259)

        I wonder, have they discovered in gnome 3.x that real people need to open real applications on the same screen?

        Or on multiple screens, for that matter.
        Or run the desktop environment in a window on a bigger screen (e.g. a VM).

        Relying on pointing devices not going past the edge of the screen takes a certain kind of talent.

        You could always press the Super key as an alternative to the hot corner. Or you could install one of the many extensions https://extensions.gnome.org/ [gnome.org] that gives you an alternative way to launch applications. Neither of these things would take as much time out of your day as your slightly odd /. post.

        Why should the lack of corners on your virtual machine prevent me from having access to useful features?

        • by HiThere ( 15173 )

          Aren't those extensions the things they promised would be going away in a later release?

          I notice you didn't answer whether more than one window can be running at once, so I'm going to guess that means only if you add some other addons....which are likely not to work with the next release.

          FWIW, I was just browsing to see if Gnome was again worth installing. Your post did not encourage me, but maybe some other will.

          • by jonnyj ( 1011131 )

            Aren't those extensions the things they promised would be going away in a later release?

            I notice you didn't answer whether more than one window can be running at once, so I'm going to guess that means only if you add some other addons....which are likely not to work with the next release.

            FWIW, I was just browsing to see if Gnome was again worth installing. Your post did not encourage me, but maybe some other will.

            I really don't understand what you mean. I have multiple windows open all the time. Window management in Gnome is pretty good, IMV.

            I tried Gnome 3 on my MacBook about 6 months ago. I instantly loved it and it's now my preferred desktop.

            • by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @07:35PM (#51765527) Homepage Journal

              I really don't understand what you mean. I have multiple windows open all the time.

              Say you want three different gnome-terminals. Not one parent and two children, but three separate ones, so if one dies, it doesn't take the others with it.
              Or say you want to open a single document in two windows, so you can scroll to separate parts and compare them, or make different changes to the two copies before saving them separately.

              Gnome 3 makes stuff like this really hard to achieve.

              • by jonnyj ( 1011131 )

                I really don't understand what you mean. I have multiple windows open all the time.

                Say you want three different gnome-terminals. Not one parent and two children, but three separate ones, so if one dies, it doesn't take the others with it.
                Or say you want to open a single document in two windows, so you can scroll to separate parts and compare them, or make different changes to the two copies before saving them separately.

                Gnome 3 makes stuff like this really hard to achieve.

                I'm still really confused. I've never noticed the problem you described before, so I flipped open my Gnome 3 laptop to check. I found four separate ways to open a new (different) terminal window within a few seconds. I have multiple terminal windows neatly tiled across my desktop in the way you describe. To be fair, though, I have never known Gnome Terminal to crash, so I have no way of testing whether one window failing would bring the others to an ignominious end.

                Only one of those four ways needed more th

                • by arth1 ( 260657 )

                  I still use X over ssh with gnome 3.18 daily without issue, as I have been with every previous version of gnome shell. What issues are you having?

                  Try doing an xkill and click one window. Unless things have changed, boom, all of them go. Not good.
                  Or you use one of the terminals to log in to a remote system, which needs CTRL-H for backspace instead of DEL for backspace. So you change that, and lo and behold, it changes it for all windows, unless you create a whole new profile first (and delete it afterwards if you don't need it).
                  Similar for color schemes and much else.

                  There are security implications too (connecting from multiple gnome-terminals to

                  • by arth1 ( 260657 )

                    (oops - my answer is correct, but my quote isn't. For which I blame Gnome's crappy copy/paste that sometimes disregards what is marked and pastes older stuff from the copy buffer instead.)

                  • by jonnyj ( 1011131 )

                    I still use X over ssh with gnome 3.18 daily without issue, as I have been with every previous version of gnome shell. What issues are you having?

                    Try doing an xkill and click one window. Unless things have changed, boom, all of them go. Not good.
                    Or you use one of the terminals to log in to a remote system, which needs CTRL-H for backspace instead of DEL for backspace. So you change that, and lo and behold, it changes it for all windows, unless you create a whole new profile first (and delete it afterwards if you don't need it).
                    Similar for color schemes and much else.

                    There are security implications too (connecting from multiple gnome-terminals to multiple servers give each destination a venue to attack not just the client machine but the other servers).

                    Or try entering "gedit .bashrc" from two different terminals (or run prompts). Where's the second window?

                    None of what you say is remotely relevant to me. I suspect it's also completely irrelevant to 99.9% of other computer users.

                    However, minorities are important. That's why you have alternatives in Linux. If Gnome 3 doesn't work for you, don't use it. But there's no need to bad-mouth it for the vast majority who have no need for your specialist use cases. Suggesting that something is bad because it doesn't work for you has a horrible way of making you look a little self-centred.

                    • by arth1 ( 260657 )

                      None of what you say is remotely relevant to me. I suspect it's also completely irrelevant to 99.9% of other computer users.

                      However, minorities are important. That's why you have alternatives in Linux. If Gnome 3 doesn't work for you, don't use it. But there's no need to bad-mouth it for the vast majority who have no need for your specialist use cases. Suggesting that something is bad because it doesn't work for you has a horrible way of making you look a little self-centred.

                      99.9% of flies eat shit.

                      You know nothing about what other users do or don't, which is why you had to ask. Don't presume to know that 99.9% of us don't do what you do.

                      This isn't new functionality I'm requesting; it's what used to be standard functionality that has been ripped out because of a new generation of developers who just don't give a levitating copulation about anything they themselves don't use, no matter how prevalent it may be among others. They grew up with the limitations of Windows, and don

                    • by fnj ( 64210 )

                      None of what you say is remotely relevant to me.

                      Then you are not relevant to me. Because all of what he said is highly relevant to me. And I can't even imagine anyone thinking it is not relevant to them. But that is my problem. More power to you. I won't belittle independent thought if you don't.

                    • by MrKaos ( 858439 )

                      None of what you say is remotely relevant to me. I suspect it's also completely irrelevant to 99.9% of other computer users.

                      No it isn't.

                      However, minorities are important. That's why you have alternatives in Linux. If Gnome 3 doesn't work for you, don't use it.

                      I dumped a few years ago because it dumped all of the things that makes it useful to someone who needs to drive their productivity to a UI that is malleable. Not Windows, not MAC, a native, high performance Linux UI with all of the configurability a long time Linux user is used to.

                      I wondered if was time to re-visit Gnome 3 and I can see from your post that it isn't. Thank you for saving me the effort.

                    • It turns out I was simply wrong but rather than admit it, "nobody actually needs this feature."

                      Class act, bro.

                    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

                      Thank you. I don't need to do those things very often, but I need to do them too often to need to change window managers before doing them.

                      So your answer to me is that for me Gnome3 isn't worth installing.

                    • We had a code base that was not flexible, what you are seeing albeit in slow motion is a code base evolving so that we can add more flexibility and more design and thought. So yes, we had to remove features and then we added them later. If we are guilty of anything it is probably that we don't communicate as well as we should.

                      In the end, we are proud of the body of work we have produced. A desktop with a distinct and unique character that isn't a derivative of somebody elses's desktop but something that

                    • I would much prefer a derivative desktop that I enjoyed using than a desktop that stands on its own but I find frustrating.

                      Furthermore, in my opinion it isn't the lack of communication; it is putting a few "designers" preferences over what looks good over the function and workflow of users and former users. At this point I don't trust the GNOME leadership enough to even use classic. Thankfully I am enjoying Cinnamon and am finally back on Linux.

                    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

                      I'm assuming that you are a Gnome3 developer.

                      From my point of view Gnome3 is in every measurable way inferior to Gnome1 (well, the final version of Gnome1). I've got to assume you are using some different metric than anything I do.

                      OTOH, my opinion of Gnome3 is based on a version over a year old. I was just checking to see if it had improved to the point where I should try it again. Answers that others have given have clearly indicated that the flaws that caused me to remove it have not been addressed, so

                  • Try doing an xkill and click one window. Unless things have changed, boom, all of them go. Not good.

                    Right-click launcher, select "New Window."

                    New Terminal does what you describe while New Window gives you a separate process.

                    Or try entering "gedit .bashrc" from two different terminals (or run prompts). Where's the second window?

                    Same with gedit. To do it from the command line use gedit --new-window or gedit -s.

                    There are security implications too (connecting from multiple gnome-terminals to multiple servers give each destination a venue to attack not just the client machine but the other servers).

                    I have no idea what you mean by this.

        • I wonder, have they discovered in gnome 3.x that real people need to open real applications on the same screen?

          Or on multiple screens, for that matter.
          Or run the desktop environment in a window on a bigger screen (e.g. a VM).

          Relying on pointing devices not going past the edge of the screen takes a certain kind of talent.

          You could always press the Super key as an alternative to the hot corner. Or you could install one of the many extensions https://extensions.gnome.org/ [gnome.org] that gives you an alternative way to launch applications. Neither of these things would take as much time out of your day as your slightly odd /. post.

          Why should the lack of corners on your virtual machine prevent me from having access to useful features?

          One of the best extensions is taskBar

    • by J053 ( 673094 )

      Also, have they fixed the impossibility of running Gnome Desktop on multiple machines with an NFS-mounted home directory? Last time I tried that, all preferences (the gconf database) got hopelessly scrambled if you changed anything.

      • by armanox ( 826486 )

        They actually have an issue with that? Once upon a time all my systems mounted the same /home/armanox from a central location, so that everything was the same on all desktops in the house.

  • I see the video @ 0:58 mentions "Keyboard Shortcuts"
    https://youtu.be/JU2f_jkPRq4?t... [youtu.be]

    While Keyboard Shortcuts is making great strides at being more use accessible it still doesn't hold a candle to how WebStorm handles shortcuts. Namely, what makes Webstorm great is that you can *search* ALL of the UI for hotkeys / shortcuts and it shows ALL the menu locations for partial matches.

    * https://youtu.be/PNZJox8pkls [youtu.be]
    * https://www.jetbrains.com/img/... [jetbrains.com]

  • two words (Score:2, Informative)

    by iggymanz ( 596061 )

    MATE and Cinnamon

  • by Type44Q ( 1233630 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @06:22PM (#51765065)
    This is a fork of Mate, right?
    • by jcdr ( 178250 )

      A bad one obviously...
      That said, I found last XFCE even better than MATE. Very easy to configure XFCE the way I want, and it provides more feature than MATE.

  • Wait..."Guh-Nome"? Is that how it's really pronounced??

    I've always pronounced it "gnome", as in "garden gnome", or like "Nome, Alaska".

    Is it really supposed to be pronounced "guh-nome"??

    And Gnome has keyboard shortcuts for "some" of the apps? Will these miraculous wonders never cease?

    With groundbreaking innovation like this it's like living in 1998 all over again. I mean, keyboard shortcuts, wow. MIND BLOWN!

    • I always pronounced it G-nome out of fear that otherwise no one would understand what I was talking about. Same with Gnu.
      • by Maow ( 620678 )

        I always pronounced it G-nome out of fear that otherwise no one would understand what I was talking about. Same with Gnu.

        Same here, except GNU.

        Plus, guh-edit? Nonsense, Gee-Edit. Gee-podder, not guh-podder, etc.

        Guh-new is how I say GNU.

    • I always thought it was Gnome as in Gnocchi. :)

      But in all seriousness it's not that hard.

      Just don't aspirate the 'g'. i.e. think of pronouncing the word 'ignore' but without the initial vowel.

  • Being a former KDE user - abandoned after they went to the Windows 10 look alike - POS! I looked at gnome, Mate and Cinnamon. I went with Cinnamon - I like it - it's light weight and works really nice - and NOT a Windows 10 look alike!

  • by Lisandro ( 799651 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @07:12PM (#51765393)

    ...i've grown to kinda like Gnome 3.

    It is far from perfect, sure - the configuration settings are still dumbed down beyond belief and some default UI choices (like the automatic window snapping on screen edges) are hard to justify. But it is a good looking, very easy to use DM which also happens to be consistent when used on touchscreen devices, something the rest of the Linux world somehow still struggles with.

    I try other DMs from time to time and always end up coming back. The only real contender Gnome 3 has is XFCE, which is what Gnome 2 should've always been in the first place.

    • Well, Cinnamon as well, which is not half bad i might add.

    • by rahvin112 ( 446269 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @09:13PM (#51766131)

      I like it as well, it was really bad early on but they've slowly been adding the customization back and yea it's dumbed down tremendously. But I like the look and the performance. It's no longer painful and is relatively useful in Jessie and I really like how easy they've made some things even if it costs me other things. I particularly like the modular nature of some of the desktop features and that I can add features I want and remove features I don't. T

      hough I don't like how they keep moving things around. When they moved the settings in the Jessie release it took me like 10 minutes to find them again, felt like I was on Windows with the continual movements of settings so you have to relearn how to do things over and over again.

      • I actually really liked Gnome 3 in Jessie as well. I liked it so much that I decided to see how much better it was in the latest version of Xubuntu. Unfortunately, in the latest versions of Gnome, they removed every single useful feature I liked about Gnome 3 in Jessie. That was actually enough to make me switch back to XFCE on Jessie since there is no point in becoming an expert in a desktop environment that drastically changes every few months. XFCE has looked and worked the same for as long as I can

        • You should keep in mind that Gnome3 may be the way it is in Jessie because of Debian and it may be the way it is Xubuntu because of Canonical. The packager can enable or disable all those features. My bet is the Debian team went for usability.

          • I actually misspoke. I had switched to the latest version of Ubuntu Gnome. They claim to be a mostly pure implementation of Gnome and I would imagine that Debian is too. The biggest features that were missing were the things revolving around the Super-M functionality and it's implementation in the switcher. That seemed like a genuinely useful feature and I was willing to learn the eccentricities of Gnome for it. It's gone in the latest versions.

            • The Debian packagers rarely package vanilla on major packages. The Debian package teams often make significant changes and incorporate features and patches all the time that aren't in the vanilla. It's one of the things I really like about Debian, the people packaging the software actually use it and often go for usability above and beyond what the developers did. The disadvantage is that the Debian package often has differences to vanilla but it's never anything that's hurt me.

              You best check on what Debian

            • In Debian? That would be strange and would require code changes, also a fundamenta change to GNOME. I doubt that is the case. Check to see if it came with some extensions or something that is doing that.
  • by wonkey_monkey ( 2592601 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @07:13PM (#51765395) Homepage

    One thing I've always wanted is the ability to open a context menu, select an item, and keep the bloody menu open.

    Does any OS/WM do this? RISC OS used to (with the right mouse button) but I've never seen it anywhere else.

    • by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @07:20PM (#51765441) Homepage Journal

      One thing I've always wanted is the ability to open a context menu, select an item, and keep the bloody menu open.

      Does any OS/WM do this? RISC OS used to (with the right mouse button) but I've never seen it anywhere else.

      "Menu Tear" used to be standard, where you could discouple a menu from its menubar, and keep it open for as long as you liked. MWM has it, SGI's 4Dwm had it, CDE (Common Desktop Environment, used by Sun and others) had it.
      I'm unsure whether KDE or Gnome is the culprit here, but it seems to be missing from most desktop environments these days.

      • GTK does support menu tear, but i've rarely seen an app using this feature.

      • MWM has it, SGI's 4Dwm had it, CDE (Common Desktop Environment, used by Sun and others) had it.

        MWM may have had tearable menus first, not sure, but the first place I saw them was on NeXTstep, in 1990. One of many good ideas that Apple discarded when they turned NeXTstep into OS X.

        GnuStep has tearable menus, as does WindowMaker.

      • by armanox ( 826486 )

        I wonder if that's a feature that still exists in MaXX (a Linux port of 4DWM)....I'll have to check, but first I'll check on my Octane because I don't remember it being there before.

    • by armanox ( 826486 )

      (IIRC) WindowMaker and AfterStep both have it.

    • RISC OS? Cool. For a long time, I thought only the Amiga had that feature, and I absolutely loved it.

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