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GNOME Operating Systems Linux

Fedora 24 Featuring GNOME 3.20, Tons Of Improvements Released (betanews.com) 174

After several delays, the Fedora Project on Tuesday released Fedora 24 (download link), the latest version of its Linux-based operating system. Fedora 24 brings with it a number of interesting features and changes, including the GNOME 3.20 desktop environment. The latest version of GNOME comes with media-player controls in the notification panel, and improved search feature in the Files application. New GNOME will also let you easily upgrade to Fedora 25, by simply using its Software application. There's also improved font-rendering. Among other things Fedora 24 has an upgraded version of glibc, or GNU C Library, which comes with improved performance and bug fixes across the entire operating system. You can learn more about the features at TechRepublic..
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Fedora 24 Featuring GNOME 3.20, Tons Of Improvements Released

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  • w00t! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by IMightB ( 533307 ) on Tuesday June 21, 2016 @11:48AM (#52360003) Journal

    I admit it's not fashionable, but I am a Fedora/CentOS/RH fanboy. Not only is Fedora offer the latest and greatest for the Desktop, but they offer enterprise level integrations and features that no other can match. FreeIPA anyone?!

    • I can't help it.. So, it comes with free beer? That's the feature most of us will be interested in! Even better if it repeals tax increases on beer!

      • by IMightB ( 533307 )

        Think AD for linux, unix, excellent CLI, UI tools, controls DNS, sudo, RBAD, HBAC, kerberos, etc etc. integrates with AD, SAML and many other things. Basically, setups up and easily unifies all the hard boring behind the scenes stuff that no one but SA's care about. If it's good enough for CERN, then it's good enough for me.

        http://lmgtfy.com/?q=freeipa [lmgtfy.com]

      • by donaldm ( 919619 )

        I can't help it.. So, it comes with free beer? That's the feature most of us will be interested in! Even better if it repeals tax increases on beer!

        Well it's not much but if you run the html5 test [html5test.com], I get the following out of a possible 555 ponts. With exception of "Qupzilla" I get the same results in Fedora 23 as well.

        Chrome - 501
        Firefox - 478
        Konqueror - 355
        Qupzilla - 521 - This is a new browser in Fedora 24

        It must be noted that I have only installed Fedora 24 in a virtual machine but not on my hardware yet. So far I have not seen any issues with Fedora 24 and will be installing it after I have done my due diligence such as backups and saving

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by WallyL ( 4154209 )

      Me too: Fedora/RH/CentOS user here. Debian packages just need too much attention (a2enmod a2ensite, wtf?) The command yum provide */file beats anything in apt I've come across. I even have installed a demo instance of FreeIPA to replace my Windows AD domain. I need to start testing it again and go entirely off-MS.

      • by lucm ( 889690 )

        The command yum

        yum is gone, now it's dnf and do you know what dnf stands for? Absolutely nothing, the guy was just looking for a short name that wasn't taken.

        Well we all know it won't live long, package management will end up in systemd like evertything else soon enough. Probably rpmctl or something like that.

        I can't believe this train wreck.

        But other than that and the usual pulseaudio bugs, yes, Fedora is awesome, second to none at the moment.

        • by dbIII ( 701233 )
          A very good thing that "dnf" does (systemd developers take special note) is that it will accept the syntax of the thing that it is replacing. Typing "yum upgrade" on a new Fedora system will pass the task off to "dnf" and it will do the job for you as if "yum" was still on the system.

          As for systemd, it only bothers me at two times - startups and shutdowns. Sometimes it hangs and won't get the job done which makes it like MS Windows years back when the only choice at times was to go for the reset button
          • by lucm ( 889690 )

            The systemd people are desktop people. That's their focus and their background (lookup systemd and see the website where it's hosted). But not only are those people half-baking things and playing sorcerer's apprentice, they also have very little concerns for the vast majority of linux use cases, i.e. servers.

            It's a fascinating situation, as if the bank tellers had taken over the bank and were making decision based on their limited exposure to how the bank was actually making money. And everybody sits around

            • by dbIII ( 701233 )
              The Daniel Stone "truth about Wayland" video of him presenting his unfinished powerpoint presentation is a good example of that attitude. Want to use software more than a couple of years old or use something other than a tablet? If you want that then to him you are an irrelevant dinosaur that should be dead already. WTF is wrong with these kids?
      • by donaldm ( 919619 )

        Me too: Fedora/RH/CentOS user here. Debian packages just need too much attention (a2enmod a2ensite, wtf?) The command yum provide */file beats anything in apt I've come across. I even have installed a demo instance of FreeIPA to replace my Windows AD domain. I need to start testing it again and go entirely off-MS.

        From Fedora 23 on dnf has replaced yum. Basically dnf is really dandied yum so not allot has changed.

        Fedora like most Linux distros has had a GUI installer or package manager for years which is every bit as functional as the using command line.

        As for using MS Windows try installing Windows 10 in a virtual machine (you can get the ISO free from Microsoft) and then look at all the features that are turned on by default. Good luck getting rid of all the telemetry although most people with a bit of technica

    • that's fine but I hope you don't put that GNOME crap on it, use a good desktop like MATE or Cinnamon

    • by mea2214 ( 935585 )
      I run mostly Fedora/CentOS as well but my workstation where I am typing this is Fedora 14 because it's the last stable distro before all the innovators started making things "better." If I need a more modern OS that's what VMs and ssh are for.
      • I run mostly Fedora/CentOS as well but my workstation where I am typing this is Fedora 14 because it's the last stable distro before all the innovators started making things "better."

        Fedora 11 here, for the same reason. I tried F24 beta recently and the installer was a horror show selecting disk space and mount points. At one point something I tried gave me the error "Failed to add new device - local variable 'e' referenced before assignment". When I finally got a mount point selected, the final selectio

      • by donaldm ( 919619 )

        I run mostly Fedora/CentOS as well but my workstation where I am typing this is Fedora 14 because it's the last stable distro before all the innovators started making things "better." If I need a more modern OS that's what VMs and ssh are for.

        Wow! Fedora 14 (late 2010 to late 2011) and saying that it's the last stable distro boy I don't even know why you bother. I just put Fedora 24 on a virtual machine under Fedora 23 and it took an exhausting 20 minutes, I mean having to click on the install icon, then the language (it was already selected) and then select "Install" was hard but then having to create a root password followed by a user name and password really is incredibly difficult. Oh! It works.

    • by Dadoo ( 899435 )

      I am a Fedora/CentOS/RH fanboy.

      I used to be, too, but Fedora hasn't been really good since 14 or 15; they ruined it when they upgraded to Gnome 3. I prefer KDE but Fedora 14 was so good, I didn't care it was easier to use it with Gnome. (It would be nice if they'd support KDE better.)

      • Yep, 14 was the last one for me. I was exclusively a RH guy all the way from RH5 up to FC14. (and for some reason the weenies here can't handle it, so I gather downmods...)

    • I admit it's not fashionable, but I am a Fedora/CentOS/RH fanboy. Not only is Fedora offer the latest and greatest for the Desktop, but they offer enterprise level integrations and features that no other can match. FreeIPA anyone?!

      I was, but this time, my standard is Fedora23. My UPS does not show up with Fedora24. upower-0.99.4.tar.xz does not compile with Fedora24
      I won't run a SSD based system if when necessary, the UPS can't tell the computer to "shutdown now / poweroff "

      With spinning disks, any file corruption can be usually repaired on reboot with the ext4 or xfs journal.
      With SSDs, the entire SSD can be accidentally wiped out due to an unplanned shutdown.

  • fedora 24 (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    does it still have systemd and gnome3? If so, don't want.

  • >> New GNOME (in Fedora 24) will also let you easily upgrade to Fedora 25

    Ummm...that's one of your "tons of improvements"?
    • by geek ( 5680 )

      >> New GNOME (in Fedora 24) will also let you easily upgrade to Fedora 25

      Ummm...that's one of your "tons of improvements"?

      Unfortunately yes. Fedora has had a huge problem with upgrades in the past. They believe they have finally fixed that.

      • It's been fixed since what was it... Fedora 17? IIRC that was the last one where the upgrade issues were more prevalent. I haven't had trouble since then with in place upgrades.

      • by fnj ( 64210 )

        New GNOME (in Fedora 24) will also let you easily upgrade to Fedora 25

        Fedora has had a huge problem with upgrades in the past. They believe they have finally fixed that.

        All right, I'll bite. What the hell does the DE have to do with whether your upgrade-release mechanism works or is broken? Or whether there even is an upgrade-release mechanism?

      • by donaldm ( 919619 )

        >> New GNOME (in Fedora 24) will also let you easily upgrade to Fedora 25

        Ummm...that's one of your "tons of improvements"?

        Unfortunately yes. Fedora has had a huge problem with upgrades in the past. They believe they have finally fixed that.

        You do know that Fedora has had "spins" for a few years now. You can choose KDE, XFce, LXDE, Mate-Compiz, Gnome, Cinnamon, SOAS (see here [fedoraproject.org]).

        As for upgrading or fresh install, I find that it is actually quicker to do a fresh install providing you have configured your filesystems such that your system filesystems don't contain user data. Obviously, due diligence is important here in that you should know what add-ons you require (ie. document them) and any configurations you need such as password and group

    • They're actually referring to doing easy updates via a GUI since IIRC Fedora hasn't had a distro-upgrade gui. Thusly requiring the terminal for distro upgrades....which is easy enough.

      In the terminal you use dnf system-upgrade though you can still use the old "fedup" command (which redirects to dnf system-upgrade)

      Upgrading F23 to F24 in the terminal is as easy as:

      [code]
      sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=24
      sudo dnf system-upgrade reboot[/code]

      Of course, if one waits a couple of days the F23 version of gnome-software will be updated to support graphical distro update.

  • Torrents (Score:4, Informative)

    by l2718 ( 514756 ) on Tuesday June 21, 2016 @12:12PM (#52360175)
    Grab a torrent [fedoraproject.org] now and help your peers!
    • I've been told that torrents are unilaterally theft of copyrighted material and thus shouldn't be used. We all know there can't ever be a legitimate use for torrents. I don't condone your behaviour!

      • I never understood the use case with torrents and free software.

        The whole point of a binary distro like fedora or debian is that a local user group within your country mirrors the content within 24 hours and downloads from your ISP are unmetered by using said mirror.

        • How about eliminating the requirement of this infrastructure. I mean it was good an all, but what benefit does that offer over a wide distributed system? Even torrents have the ability to prevent unmetered downloads in similar ways. I remember getting distros off torrents on a private tracker on PIPE networks since that specific network didn't count to my data.

          • unmetered torrents would be dependent on the ISP, no?

            The last install I did was with a 20MB netinstall ISO and fetching the packages I need on demand - to me that beats getting a 4GB DVD images, whose packages become obsolete the moment they hit the network.

            And on one of my boxes I've been updating the same Ubuntu installation since Jaunty (2009), without need to reinstall.

  • Obligatory (Score:5, Funny)

    by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Tuesday June 21, 2016 @12:19PM (#52360219) Homepage Journal

    Featuring GNOME 3.20, Tons Of Improvements

    Make your mind up. Which is it?

    • by l2718 ( 514756 )
      Yes, I've never seen the point of GNOME, especially since Fedora includes fvwm which is much better. Frankly, I'd rather return to my previous choice of tvtwm than go with GNOME.
  • For people like me who run the XFCE spin specifically to get away from the bloated nightmare that is Gnome 3.x, is there anything in this latest release that is of any interest?
    • You're aware that Fedora officially supports other DEs, right? : https://spins.fedoraproject.or... [fedoraproject.org]
      • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
        Does matter which DE you select, I'm torrenting them all. Leech away! Over 100GiB of Fedora 24 uploaded by the time I woke up this morning.
      • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

        Of course, he said " people like me who run the XFCE spin". Then you linked to the xfce spin.

        And the answer is yes, and gone over in the article- ipv6 ping, newer versions of compilers ( https://gcc.gnu.org/gcc-6/chan... [gnu.org] ), new open source codec, and I think the greater Unicode support will affect us in XFCE land.

        I will tell you what Fedora version I plan to skip: whatever initially switches us to Wayland. That will be a guaranteed shit-show, and a good call to avoid upgrading for a few months. But 24 i

        • I will tell you what Fedora version I plan to skip: whatever initially switches us to Wayland. That will be a guaranteed shit-show, and a good call to avoid upgrading for a few months. But 24 is solid methinks.

          Thanks! Yeah, I'll likely sit that one out as well. X works just fine for what I do.

  • Ah yes, I remember participating in the Fedora treadmill. Then I discovered Arch. With Arch I have the latest packages every single day, and I never have to reinstall or upgrade to a new release. With either of them (running Arch or constantly upgrading to the newest Fedora) you do at times run into buggy bleeding edge behavior. For systems I need to be stable and absolutely dependable (basically servers/infrastructure), I stick with CentOS or FreeBSD.

  • Probably 16 or 17. I've been using Fedora since FC3 and its quality went up until things stopped working during installation. For instance, I used to be able to switch to command prompt during installation, set up my drives in any RAID format I wanted, with ANY parameters I wanted, and have the graphical installation recognize my setup and install away. Even wireless worked off the bat on the notebooks I installed on.

    Come the new installation process and it looks like everything is dummied down, which I

    • by Dadoo ( 899435 )

      Probably 16 or 17.

      No, I'd say 14 or 15. I'm pretty sure it was 16 where they started using Gnome 3, and that's when everything fell apart. Things still haven't completely recovered.

      • by lsllll ( 830002 )
        When they did Gnome 3 I moved to XFCE and have never looked back.
        • by Dadoo ( 899435 )

          When they did Gnome 3 I moved to XFCE and have never looked back.

          I like KDE, myself, but the Fedora project only really supports Gnome well, especially when it comes to system settings.

    • by donaldm ( 919619 )

      Incidentally, when did systemd make its way into Fedora?

      30 March 2010; 6 years ago

      BTW. For Fedora, all you need to do is choose a Live Spin [fedoraproject.org], boot and test to see if it is to your liking then if you do like what you see you can install. If you don't like it then take out your USB key and reboot back to the OS you were originally using.

      Each "Spin" has it's own basic packages, which are enough to get you started. Once you have installed the "Spin" you want then it is a simple matter of using your package manager (GUI) or "dnf" to install particular packages w

  • My 2cents is the Linux ecosystem doesn't work well together, you might have a stable OS, but then the UI and apps suck balls, there is no good financial backing for consumer software companies to make apps for the OS. There are many times I tried to use Ubuntu for my work machines, while it's easy to use for software dev box but the apps I wanted to use were not there, the desktop was so unstable to make me move to OSX. OSX is great, you get a decent shell, and also stable desktop and plenty of solid apps.
  • Slackware with dropline gnome 3.20 will also be out shortly :)
  • I miss having to startx manually and landing on blackbox/fluxbox for the window manager to conserve memory & CPU. Yes, I'm the old codger who still thinks INIT is better than the newfangled whatchamacallit. Not trying to troll, but I get carried away and feel really old when I feel the need to post a rant like this when I see an aarticle about a GUI that's way overkill. CLI! CLI! CLI!

    (Slinks back into his cave)

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