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Linux

Linux 4.0 Kernel Released 172

An anonymous reader writes "The Linux 4.0 kernel has been released. Linux 4.0 brings many features including live patching, Radeon DisplayPort Audio, RadeonSI fan control improvements, new OverlayFS functionality, Intel Quark SoC support, and a heck of a lot more. Linus's release announcement reads in part: "So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren't any known issues, and while I'll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I'm hoping that won't affect the merge window very much. We'll see. Linux 4.0 was a pretty small release both in linux-next and in final size, although obviously 'small' is all relative. It's still over 10k non-merge commits. But we've definitely had bigger releases (and judging by linux-next v4.1 is going to be one of the bigger ones)."
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Linux 4.0 Kernel Released

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 13, 2015 @08:09AM (#49461907)

    Four major versions in 25 years, who does Linus think he is? He's drunk with power!

  • I suppose I should start looking to upgrade my old Centos 6.6 box. I'm running a 2.6.32 kernel on that. I've thought about upgrading to the new Centos 7,0 but I'm not sure I want to fuck with it. The current system I have works perfectly and does exactly what I need it to do.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 13, 2015 @09:08AM (#49462189)

      I suppose I should start looking to upgrade my old Centos 6.6 box. I'm running a 2.6.32 kernel on that. I've thought about upgrading to the new Centos 7,0 but I'm not sure I want to fuck with it. The current system I have works perfectly and does exactly what I need it to do.

      Well Centos 7 will cure that. It's based on systemd.

    • Someone seriously, went to the effort to mod this down? Was it because I suggested that I might go to a dist with systemd on it? Really, don't you have better things to do than worry about what is running on my bitch box?

    • The current system I have works perfectly and does exactly what I need it to do.

      Then I recommend not upgrading. The only reason to upgrade so if you run out of security updates or if you need newer features from a newer version.

  • by Chris Katko ( 2923353 ) on Monday April 13, 2015 @09:01AM (#49462153)
    It's kind of funny that Microsoft has also decided to move their Kernel from version 6.1.62.6.2.7.21.1.6.2.2.000.02.432.523.253.532 to 10.0 in Windows 10.

    I wonder if some useless managers got wind of Linux changing theirs, and made their developers change the number.

    "Dear busy senior developers: I just found out Linux made a bigger number. Why can't we? Why are you wasting our time fixing bugs? Add this feature I just heard about today! It's very important.

    Sincerely,
    --Scott Miller"
    • by Zocalo ( 252965 )
      Why couldn't they have done this when those Downfall parodies were all the range, this one could have been awesome. Hitler, Developers, Developers, Developers, Linux is a Cancer, the Secret Flying Chairs of the Luftwaffe. It practically writes itself...
    • IIRC MS always wanted versions of windows to incitement the major release every time they released a new OS. Turns out they couldn't because too many software developers screwed up detecting the version of windows the OS was and it software wouldn't run on newer versions.

  • Are they planning to adjust how RdRand is used in random.c ?
    • No, it's not an issue.

      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2... [theregister.co.uk]

      RdRand could be 100% predictable and it wouldn't cause a problem.

      • by sinij ( 911942 )
        RdRand could be non-random without negative impact, but what if it is maliciously non-random? For example, manipulating RdRand to consistently pump duplicate of the output buffer will result in a very compromised seeding (0x0000..).
        • It hasn't been observed to do that...if RdRand was found to ever produce meaningful quantities of low-randomness output, then it should be eliminated as an entropy source.

          • by sinij ( 911942 )
            I don't think you are fully considering the possibility of maliciousness. RdRand, because of on-chip whitening is completely opaque, there is no way to audit its functionality. How can we trust something like that with such crucial cryptographic functionality? If your seed your RNGs with predictable seed, then all of your crypto can be easily broken.

            Sure, if CPU is backdoored, then your system is compromised no matter what you do, and it can leak all secrets in whichever way. Most of that can be detect
  • by jones_supa ( 887896 ) on Monday April 13, 2015 @11:20AM (#49463269)

    I'd like to interject for a moment. Sadly, the desktop is still extremely glitchy. Let me show some examples.

    1) Notebookcheck a new Intel NUC [notebookcheck.net]. Intel HD Graphics 6000 was missing Linux support at the moment of writing. That's not the end of the world, but how does Linux Mint report about it? Nope, you don't get an informative "device not supported" message, nor does X.org fall back to a VESA mode. Instead you get corrupted graphics! Nice failure mode there. Just look at the screenshot in the article. Does that look professional to you?

    2) When you install Linux, various manual hacks are needed to correct all sorts of little glitches here and there. Read the installation report of this guy [wordpress.com]. Does that seem familiar?

    3) Laptop brightness adjustment still goes in multiple steps! I can't believe this bug is still around. The same issue is in Ubuntu in Mint and affects most laptops. Bug #527157 [launchpad.net]. Just try pressing the brightness keys of your laptop under Linux and you see what I mean. An everyday feature like this should Just Work without me having to even think about it.

    Conclusion: I need an desktop operating system that is more deterministic in behavior. I want robust and predictable user experience. This is not rock solid at all.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You need to accept that Linux is for competent people, and it will never be the right OS for you. Seriously. Just find a website somewhere where people want to hear M$ Fanboi drivel and go there. You add no value here.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      "Conclusion: I need an desktop operating system that is more deterministic in behavior."

      Conclusion: you need an desktop hardware that properly makes public its spec and/or provides drivers for more than just a single operating system.

      Somehow I managed to do it for the last fifteen years and more.

      • Intel provides more support and documentation for their hardware than anyone else of consequence. Their graphics drivers are very widely considered the best for linux, and they contribute a huge amount to kernel dev.

        If Intel hardware isnt working right, there are serious problems.

  • by lordmage ( 124376 ) on Monday April 13, 2015 @02:27PM (#49464825) Homepage

    So www.lwn.net has a better section dealing with the 4.0 kernel including what persistent memory and lazytime changes are. I would suggest going there.

    http://www.lwn.net/ [lwn.net]

    I like to find more information than the smattering that was a "detailed look". as they say.. NOT.

"It's a dog-eat-dog world out there, and I'm wearing Milkbone underware." -- Norm, from _Cheers_

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