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Windows 8 Is 'a Work of Art.' But It's No Linux 371

Posted by timothy
from the design-team-denied-your-request dept.
colinneagle writes "Earlier this week I installed the final version of Windows 8. And it is awesome. That's not a joke. Windows 8 is absolutely, unequivocally stellar. And yet, at the end of the day, I am right back to using Linux. Why is that? What is it about Linux that makes me so excited to use it — even while enjoying another operating system that I view as, in all seriousness, a work of art? Why do I not simply install Windows 8 on every machine I own and be happy with it? For me, it's the ability to slowly chip away and remove items from your user interface until you are left with only want you want, and nothing more. The option of looking at an item on the screen, right clicking on it, and declaring to said item 'Listen up, mister Thing-On-My-Screen. I don't want you anymore. Be gone!' Panels, bars, docks, launchers, widgets, gadgets – whatever is on your screen, there is probably a way to send it to whatever form of the afterlife is reserved for unwanted Desktop Crud. And, I'll tell you this right now – as great as it is, you don't find a whole lot of 'Right click, Remove Panel' in Windows 8."
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Windows 8 Is 'a Work of Art.' But It's No Linux

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  • A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:23PM (#41182765)
    I don't visit a news site for opinion pieces.
    • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Sir_Sri (199544) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:31PM (#41182855)

      Especially not one as bizarre as this.

      The definitive feature of linux is being able to right click and remove a panel... good for it? That wouldn't even be a feature on windows, it would be a disaster, because my 70 year old aunt would accidentally remove something important, not be sure what it was, and call me to find out how to fix it. All the people in my office would remove things, want them back, and not be able to find them. Etc.

      You can have an opinion piece that makes some sort of interesting argument about why this feature really changes the computing experience, and how its absence in windows renders the OS unworthy to use, ok, that could actually be interesting. But TFA spends 3/4ths of its length on superficial discussions of things - and the places where a serious and sensible discussion could be made are given no real treatment.

      TFA sort of ends on what he should have started with - the different philosophies between linux and windows 8 - that could have made for a very interesting opinion piece that would have been worth posting on /. But it's not there.

      • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:38PM (#41182973)

        TFA sort of ends on what he should have started with - the different philosophies between linux and windows 8 - that could have made for a very interesting opinion piece that would have been worth posting on /. But it's not there.

        That's because a rational discussion on the philosophical and design approaches of different user interfaces is not troll clickbait. The purpose of this article is to drive as many people here to flame about how Windows 8 is terrible and ugly and the worst OS in the world. And what do you know, take a look at first 5 posts below this one and you'll see exactly that.

        • by leromarinvit (1462031) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:11PM (#41183481)

          That's because a rational discussion on the philosophical and design approaches of different user interfaces is not troll clickbait. The purpose of this article is to drive as many people here to flame about how Windows 8 is terrible and ugly and the worst OS in the world. And what do you know, take a look at first 5 posts below this one and you'll see exactly that.

          Then it's a good thing we don't RTFA here. Slashdot - sticking it to greedy publishers since 1997!

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by justforgetme (1814588)

          Well, they aren't going to get flames from me, I love windows 8. Of course my opinion might change if I actually would have to use it instead of just install another OS over it. :-P

          Seriously though, I believe win 8 is good work. Some idiot in Redmond decided that it was a good idea to unify both the touch interface and the desktop interface into one experience and for the biggest part of it they didn't do a half bad job. Still that is little praise if you consider that a goo job would still result in a revo

          • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

            by icebike (68054) * on Thursday August 30, 2012 @05:34PM (#41184547)

            Seriously though, I believe win 8 is good work. Some idiot in Redmond decided that it was a good idea to unify both the touch interface and the desktop interface into one experience and for the biggest part of it they didn't do a half bad job.

            This is fine, IFF you have a touch screen. But baring that, the interface is just an outright non-starter.

            Even with a touch screen, scrolling like a whirling dervish trying to find the pane that contains the application you want is just inefficient,
            a huge waste of energy (and one that gets more wasteful as your screen gets larger).

            The start bar and application menu that every desktop OS had wasn't developed and perfected over the years on a whim. Windows 8 desktop was.

            • Re:A Review? (Score:4, Interesting)

              by justforgetme (1814588) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @05:47PM (#41184679) Homepage

              One very insightful thing:

              Scrolling
              Did anybody notice how the metro interface is generally horizontally scrolling?

              What I perceived in a tablet try out was that while vertical scrolling is very easy and comfortable (you an have both your hands on the device and still scroll perfectly fine), horizontal scrolling, mostly due to the UX mandated device bezels and human anatomy, is much more difficult to do since you get roughly a third of the area of responsive screen real estate, unless you keep one hand free and we all know what that means [wikipedia.org]..

        • You're probably right. On the other hand - if we had had more rational-or-not discussions about Gnome 3, the Linux desktop might be in a less desolate state than it is now.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by hairyfeet (841228)

          So its just another 2 minutes of hate? Meh if you want that OSNews as an epic flamewar happening called what killed the Linux desktop [osnews.com] that is at 165 and climbing by the second. The sad part is the things the guy is pointing out, distros not being compatible, constant futzing making it impossible for third party software to find a home, busted drivers, its the same stuff guys like me have been pointing out for years.

          Look its really simple folks, does Win 8 Metro suck big hairy balls? Yes, yes it does, which

      • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by cpu6502 (1960974) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:43PM (#41183039)

        >>>That wouldn't even be a feature on windows, it would be a disaster, because my 70 year old aunt would accidentally remove something important

        Strange..... I've been right-clocking and removing shit off my Windows for years. My XP and Seven desktops are completely blank (except for the start button). I'm not sure where either you or the /. reviewer got the idea you cannot remove things from the Windows desktop.

        And yeah Windows 8 may be a work of art (pretty to look at), but I'd really like to get some actual Work accomplished thank you very much The digital equivalent of T&A doesn't let me do that. It slows me down and makes me want to switch to a OS for offices like Seven.

        • by Sir_Sri (199544)

          Depends on what you mean by remove. You can't just remove the start menu in windows 7 trivially if you don't like it. That would be a disaster. Being able to remove icons is different than being able to remove UI elements. Windows (pre windows 8) basically has 3 UI elements on the desktop, the start button, the taskbar and the desktop itself. Being able to remove any one of those would be very strange. It's bad enough that you can actually move the task bar and start menu in windows by dragging it if

          • It's bad enough that you can actually move the task bar and start menu in windows by dragging it if it's configured a particular way.

            why is that bad?

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        it was just a really long winded way of saying that if you want to customize -pretty much at all, even how big the window is- then metro apps ain't for you.

      • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Zero__Kelvin (151819) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:04PM (#41183363) Homepage

        "The definitive feature of linux is being able to right click and remove a panel... good for it? That wouldn't even be a feature on windows, it would be a disaster, because my 70 year old aunt would accidentally remove something important, not be sure what it was, and call me to find out how to fix it."

        Unless of course you actually knew what you were doing and locked the panel and/or made the appropriate config files read only.

        • by Sir_Sri (199544)

          You're assuming I set up her machine. If I did that for every person who calls me for help I'd have a job being an IT monkey, not being a scientist.

          • by geekoid (135745)

            Lets see:
            Windows users are stupid, being in IT makes you a monkey.

            Yeah, with those gross generalities and out right incorrect premise I'm sure you're just a great scientist~

            But keep going on about a premise in windows that isn't true, you being such a genius and all~

      • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Blakey Rat (99501) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:04PM (#41183369)

        That wouldn't even be a feature on windows, it would be a disaster, because my 70 year old aunt would accidentally remove something important, not be sure what it was, and call me to find out how to fix it.

        Remember those couple versions of Office that had "everything is a toolbar, even the menus"? And users would accidentally either drag their menu bar out-of-position or manage to hide it? And there was no trivial way to get them back?

        It was an unmitigated disaster.

        So yes, I agree with you 100%. There's nothing wrong with customizability, but a lot of time it impacts usability.

      • by slapout (93640)

        You've never had your aunt run into the "There are unused icons on your desktop" message have you?

        • by Sir_Sri (199544)

          Oh god.... don't remind me.

          Lots of people use their desktops to store bookmarks rather than to start programs. those people are going to be screwed by windows 8. It's wrong to use the desktop to link to bookmarks - but they do it anyway.

      • Re:A Review? (Score:5, Informative)

        by sjames (1099) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:48PM (#41183955) Homepage

        Funny thing, my Mom (nearly 70) uses an Ubuntu machine I set up for her to do browsing, email, and Mahjong and has never screwed it up.

        The philosophical discussion is there, you're just overlooking it. The point is that Linux is fully modular (right down to the kernel). Don't like it? Remove it. That goes for the entire GUI system if you want, strip it ALL out and it will happily keep working. In extreme cases, you can strip out the entire userspace. Just stick your own app in as init in the initrd and be happy.

        In Linux there is no sense of having anything crammed down your throat. If you don't like something, it's outta there, no questions asked.

        The flip side is that there is nothing there that can get in the way of whatever you DO want on the system.

    • by sjames (1099)

      And yet, here you are :-)

  • by erroneus (253617) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:24PM (#41182777) Homepage

    I know others will say the same thing. But I wanted to say it first if that's possible.

    On my list of most annoying things about GNOME 3's GNOME shell is that I can't remove or customize the bar on the top... not easily anyway.

    I want my old panels back.

  • by DeeEff (2370332) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:26PM (#41182801)

    Then beauty is certainly in the eye of the beholder, and you need to get your eyes checked.

  • by kheldan (1460303) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:27PM (#41182819) Journal
    Art is in the eye of the beholder.
    Personally I think it's a piece of crap.
    Of course, if you definition of 'art' is 'something that evokes and emotional response', then I guess it's art: it evokes a feeling of disgust and revoltion in me, I want to get it as far away from me (and my equipment) as possible.
  • lameness (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:28PM (#41182825)

    you're lame; linux isn't about the UI dillhole.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by kat_skan (5219)

      And there you have it folks. The reason that the Linux desktop has never taken off in just eight condescending little words.

  • by TubeSteak (669689) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:29PM (#41182837) Journal

    I kid you not, the copy file progress dialog in Windows 8 is a thing of beauty. If you havenâ(TM)t seen it in action, and you are a fan of cool user interfaces, you owe it to yourself. To say I am impressed with what the team at Microsoft has accomplished would be a massive understatement.

    So I take this to mean that MS did not fix the dialog's 5000% difference between guesstimated time and actual transfer time?

  • Yah Right... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by KlomDark (6370) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:30PM (#41182849) Homepage Journal

    Paid Troll anyone?

  • by Eldragon (163969) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:31PM (#41182853)

    'Work of Art' is an interesting choice of words. The art world is full of examples of 'art' that shocks and offends the viewer for precisely that purpose.

    So when someone says Windows 8 is a 'Work of Art' I have to ask "Do you mean The Mona Lisa or L.H.O.O.Q.?"

  • by nweaver (113078) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:31PM (#41182869) Homepage

    OS-X is almost entirely free of OS-derived graphical gunk. You have the desktop (which can be blank), and the doc (which can be hidden), and a few things along the menu bar in the upper right hand corner (which can be hidden).

    Other than that, it already meets his "graphical gunk free" ideal.

    • by bananaquackmoo (1204116) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:35PM (#41182947)
      You're kidding right? OSX has TONS of OS-derived graphical gunk. Gradients, drop shadows, and I hope you like chrome. A dock and a menu bar that you can't get rid of? Animations you can't turn off? Transparency? I don't want ANY of that crud, especially since its eye-candy that slows things down.
      • by R3d M3rcury (871886) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @08:39PM (#41185859) Journal

        [...] Gradients, drop shadows [...]

        Try this [osxdaily.com].

        A dock and a menu bar that you can't get rid of?

        If you can deal with it just being hidden, you can hide it by going to the Apple menu and choosing Dock -> Turn Hiding On. If you want to actually get rid of it, there's this. [addictivetips.com]

        The menu bar? Uh...you got me there. But without a menu bar, there's not that much you can do. Kind of like saying, "Why can't I get rid of the Start menu" in Windows.

        Animations you can't turn off?

        Well, you can turn off window animations [osxdaily.com], and a bunch more [chriswrites.com].

        Transparency?

        You can turn off the translucent menu bar by going to System Preferences, choosing Desktop & Screen Saver, and unchecking the "Translucent Menu Bar" checkbox.

        Anything else?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by PPH (736903)

      All I need is a shell prompt and a blinking cursor.

  • I liked most things about win8. It boots SO fast compared to win7. {IMHO} MS shouldn't have put such an emphasis on touchscreen or at least make it configurable for "normal" desktop / tablet use.
    • by gl4ss (559668)

      imho I don't care if it boots any faster.. got a nice ssd and win7 boots by the time I can get my ass on the sofa after plugging in the hdmi cable.

      the improvements on desktop side aren't bad, but the redactions made on that side to move people into ms appstore metro land are just too much.

  • I don't find it much easier to remove features from mainstream Linux distros anymore than I do in Windows. The dependencies often prohibit removing even the most useless apps without taking the entire Desktop and other vital things with it. Of course, this is not the case in something like Arch, or Gentoo, but in Windows it's pretty easy to turn services off in Administrative Tasks and even through the registry. Also, I think neither Unity or Gnome3 go out the way to offer customizable UIs.

    ~ sudo $ apt-g
    • by jedidiah (1196)

      It's not about de-installing it, it's about making sure it does or does not run.

      Whether or not it contributes to cruft on the disk is fairly unimportant.

      • Any idea on an easy method of making sure Zeitgeist doesn't run? I've have entirely removed it already, but am still up for an easier, clean method. Upstart isn't nearly as straightforward (to me) as rc.conf and has left me tolerating a few daemons I'd rather not in Mint.
    • by isorox (205688)

      ~ sudo $ apt-get remove completely-unnecessary-application

      Care to offer a real example?

  • by Anubis IV (1279820) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:32PM (#41182885)

    ...but this piece just reeks of trolling the Windows crowd. Why do we need a multi-hundred word paragraph explaining that you can hide items in Linux but not in Windows? An even better question: what reason do we have to be interested in colinneagle's opinion? It's neither insightful nor unique, let alone relevant to most people, since this is not the feature that will make or break the deal for the vast majority of users choosing between the two OSes. I'm glad he's been able to make a decision for himself, but why should a typical nerd be interested in this opinion piece?

  • Awesome (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:34PM (#41182921)

    >And it is awesome.

    adjective: awe-inspiring, striking, shocking, imposing, terrible, amazing, stunning, wonderful, alarming, impressive, frightening, awful, overwhelming, terrifying, magnificent, astonishing, horrible, dreadful, formidable, horrifying, intimidating, fearful, daunting, breathtaking, majestic, solemn, fearsome, wondrous (archaic or literary), redoubtable, jaw-dropping, stupefying

    Collins Thesaurus of the English Language â" Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

    Can't argue with that.

  • "whatever is on your screen, there is probably a way to send it to whatever form of the afterlife is reserved for unwanted Desktop Crud"

    Well, on KDE 4 on openSUSE 12.1, I have these screen tips that show up on the programs I have open in the panel. Every time my mouse gets near the panel - such as when I'm TRYING to click on something low on the screen and I overshoot a bit - they pop up and obscure what I want to click on. If I move the mouse a bit I can get rid of the obscuring screen tip but it's incredi

  • What a surprise (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:35PM (#41182933)

    Tech-savvy user prefer highly-configurable things that can be customized by tech-savvy users and dislikes things designed to be used as-is by computer idiots. News at 10...

    What I'm really wondering though is whether this "article" is a cleverly disguise Windows 8 plug: the Linux bit is there to prevent the poster for being marked as a Microsoft shill, while the real message is "Windows 8 is a work of art". Because really, that's the only thing people who are afraid of Linux will read.

    Linux lovers who find Windows 8 a work of art seem suspicious to me...

    • What I'm really wondering though is whether this "article" is a cleverly disguise Windows 8 plug: the Linux bit is there to prevent the poster for being marked as a Microsoft shill, while the real message is "Windows 8 is a work of art".

      It is a cleverly disguised OS-X plug meant to discredit the concept of letting users determine how they want their UI to look.. What better way to discredit Linux configurability than to suggest that the type of person who likes to configure their Linux installation will be impressed by the beauty of Windows 8?

    • Re:What a surprise (Score:5, Interesting)

      by bws111 (1216812) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:32PM (#41183779)

      I disagree with your assessment. It is not tech-savvy users who prefer highly-configurable things, it is people that have nothing better to do than tinker with their system. And it is not computer idiots who like things to work as-is, it is people who just want to use their tools.

      I am tech-savvy. I have been developing Linux applications (server-side) and using them in critical production environments for over a decade. No complaints, Linux works perfectly and is trouble-free in that environment.

      A few weeks ago I decided to take the plunge and switch from using Windows on my primary workstation, to using Linux. Installation (RHEL 6) was very smooth, no problems.

      Here is my experience. Log on first time, get desktop window. Looks reasonable. Start web browser (firefox). Dear god, what is with those fonts? They are absolutely hideous. OK, I'll see what the wisdom of the web says about that. Aha! All you have to do is intall the msttcorefonts package, and you are good to go. OK, I'll give that a try - it works! I have usable fonts. Hmm, I wonder what the msttcorefonts package did? I see, it installed fonts from Windows!

      Go to another web page. Uh-oh, more trouble. Thi s pa ge h as tex t that lo oks li ke thi s. WTF? Back to the web. Well, you must be missing a font. Find out what the web page is trying to use. OK, it is using Helvetica, about the most popular font in the world. Well, you are in trouble then, because there is no legal Helvectica package for Linux. But, you are in luck, thanks to the wonderfulness of Linux. All you need to do I write some obscure XML and put it in the /etc/fonts/local.font file, and all of the 'Hevetica' requests will be automatically changed to use Microsofts(!) Arial font. I do that, and lo and behold it does work.

      OK, some I am doing some work with a maximizde window, and I move the mouse up to the lop right corner of the screen to close the window, and WTF! All of the windows on my desktop make a cute little circle, and I have to click on the window I wanted to close to make it active. Try to close it again, same thing! Oh, I see, I have to be very careful not to put the mouse all the way in the corner. I can't think of any reason I would want this behavior, so I want to turn it off. Should be easy, right? Just right-click on the desktop and there will be an option to turn that off, right? Nope. Well, I am stumped. Back to the web. Look, you stupid noob, that is not a desktop setting, it is a window manager setting. You must go into the 'Compiz Settings' app from the Control Center. Why didn't I think of that? It is plainly obvious that something called Compiz would be controlling what happens with my mouse! OK, I am in the Compiz settings, so where is the setting that says 'put the windows in a circle'? Aha! It is the one with a music note icon and the name of 'Scale'. Makes perfect sense. How could I be so stupid as to not know that?

      OK, now it has been a few days, and I want to add one of my frequently-used programs to the 'Favorites' menu. Right-click on the Favorites menu - nothing. OK, I'll create it on the desktop. Lo and behold, there is a 'create launcher' function. I create the launcher. The icon shows up as a spring with a board on it, but I don't really care about that. Right click on the icon, and Tada! there is an 'Add to favorites' option. Click it. Absolutely nothing happens. Back to the web. No, you stupid noob, you did it wrong. You need to go into the .local/share/applications directly and manally create a launcher. That launcher will the show up in the 'Application Browser', and you can add it to the favorites from there.

      I was never any kind of Windows fan, but I think I am starting become one after that experience.

  • How deep into Google did you have to dig to find someone that likes that trashy artwork?
  • by leromarinvit (1462031) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:41PM (#41183025)

    Most artists don't like people messing with their artworks. So maybe the lack of customizability is a reflection of that. Linux OTOH is more like a mechanic's (or artist's, for that matter) toolbox. It usually looks like shit, but it can take a beating and still get the job done. And nobody is going to look at you funny if you rearrange things to your liking.

    I can certainly understand the author. My home looks a lot more like a toolbox filled with random useful (and some not so useful) things than an architecture exhibit. And no matter how pretty they may look, I wouldn't want to live in one.

    • by Arker (91948)
      Semantics is important and this is a good example of why. 'Linux' and 'Windows' are apples and oranges. Linux doesnt specify or include any sort of GUI, it's just a darned good kernel you are allowed to build whatever you want on top of it.
  • Windows 8 will be great on tablets and phones. Laptops? perhaps 20% less annoying than desktops, where Win8 is a UI fail. Touchscreen UIs are not useful for desktops. We've had touchscreens for ages, but nobody wants to spend 8+ hours a day using gestures, nor does the idea of cheetos-stained fingers smudging up the screen excite me in the least (not that my fingers are cheetos-stained, but I've known plenty of people who fit this general type).

    If removing UI elements is your idea of a "Dream OS" then perha

  • by PPH (736903) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:46PM (#41183085)

    ... works by Pablo Picasso. But I'll be damned if I can figure them out.

  • Yea, a work of art, like picaso. That doesn't make it user friendly. The fact that you said linux is better pretty much sums it all up - it is good but not the best on the market
  • by Anonymous Coward

    There was one comment from a keynote speech by John Carmack a few week ago. And for all the rest of the talk that was brilliant, this comment was the most relevant. And that was that he an iD recently switched from Windows Xp to Windows 7. And that yeah, it was nice. It was a bit better in a lot of areas, it did one technical thing a lot better. But for the most part, he just didn't care.

    And for that matter neither did I when I made the same switch. Certainly, I wouldn't go back if I were just given a free

    • by neminem (561346)

      Who cares? A lot of people who actually use their OS's GUI for stuff on a daily basis. All of whom, the moment they're forced to use Win8, will first go complain about it on a random forum, and then go download 3rd party apps to get everything back the way it was.

      So I guess you're right.

  • What is it about Linux that makes me so excited to use it?

    Price, price, and price.

  • I'll bite (Score:5, Funny)

    by wonkey_monkey (2592601) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @03:52PM (#41183181) Homepage

    And yet, at the end of the day, I am right back to using Linux. Why is that?

    Because you're a human being and we all have different opinions. For some reason yours have been promoted to a Slashdot article, but for the life of me I can't figure out why.

  • At first I had vowed there was NO WAY I was going to pay to put Windows 8 on my desktop or laptop, but...after seeing these new laptop/tablet hybrids being announced, I think a Windows 8 machine is in short order...and Stardock announced a free tool to put your start menu back, while still allowing you to run Metro apps (something I'm sure Microsoft will add itself eventually) all sort of makes me think...$25? Sure, why not? I actually thought I was going to get a Surface too, but now all these prototypes a
  • But honestly, what is attractive about windows 8? I admit, I have never used it. But to me it looks god-awful. Just terrible. A completely disorganized mish-mash of ugly tiles. I look at it and can't see how it's supposed to work.

    The reviews RAVE about it, but it still looks terrible to me, and none of the reviewers have ever managed to explain what exactly is so good about it.

    Can somebody take a stab at telling me just what the appeal is?
    • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:50PM (#41183993)

      But honestly, what is attractive about windows 8? I admit, I have never used it. But to me it looks god-awful. Just terrible. A completely disorganized mish-mash of ugly tiles. I look at it and can't see how it's supposed to work.

      You've heard the advice "make it so simple a 5-year-old could use it", right? Well, unfortunately the head of Windows development is a bit hard of hearing - he thought they said "make it look like a 5-year-old designed it".

  • First, you are not talking about operating systems but graphical user interfaces.

    But to the point.

    My personal opinion is that I love OS X look and simplicity. And I love(d) GNOME 2.x simplicity and pastel look.
    But I can not stand neither of them in my computer as I want to do more than copy few files from USB-stick to desktop and use WWW-browser or listen music and watch videos.
    (For me, even moving some files with Finder is pain in the ass unless they are right front of me.)

    I want to love Metro (or what oth

  • by sootman (158191)

    "Guy prefers something; blogs about it" is front-page news now? Even more so, "Guy prefers old thing he's grown used to over many years"?

    Personally, I like OS X the most. I'm sure we could find other people who think Windows XP, 7, or 8 are the best. What was the point of this again?

  • by Chris Mattern (191822) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:19PM (#41183601)

    The "Mona Lisa" is a work of art, but I can't use it to get my work done. I want a *tool*.

  • by Rob_Bryerton (606093) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @04:51PM (#41184003) Homepage
    Now hold on a minute, there's lots of different kinds of art.

    Is it art, as in Manzoni's "Merda d'artista"? [wikipedia.org]
  • by dtjohnson (102237) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @06:04PM (#41184855)

    I rarely use Windows and then only because something absolutely requires it. Like the TFA author, removing unwanted cruft from the desktop (and system) is a key reason I dislike Windows. For example, Windows Update repeatedly nagged to install Windows Media Player 11 (the newest one) which I finally did to watch (I thought) DVDs. However, as many of you probably know, Windows Media Player 11 will NOT play DVDs. Instead, it advises you that the necessary decoder is not present on the system and points you to places where you can purchase the decoder 'plugin' for a price of anywhere from $15 to $30. Okay, fine, now it's time to dump (uninstall) the newly-installed Media Player 11 but...not so easy is that. It can only be removed by (according to Microsoft) either 1) booting to safe mode and running something called 'appwiz.cpl' or, if 1) doesn't work, then 2) running something as '%windir%\$ntUninstallwmp11$\spuninst\spuninst.exe'. This is just one small example but, generally, Microsoft decides what the user should install, use and see and then makes it extremely difficult for you if you try to stray off of the reservation.

  • by Opportunist (166417) on Thursday August 30, 2012 @06:39PM (#41185161)

    Yes. I even claim it's modern art. Let's see:

    Looks kinda pretty or cool? Check.
    Makes people think and ponder about its purpose? Check.
    Makes people talk about it? Check.
    Serves no practical purpose? Check.
    Is overpriced eye candy? Check.

  • by sudden.zero (981475) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [orez.neddus]> on Thursday August 30, 2012 @06:48PM (#41185217)
    ...interesting customization for Windows 8

    http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9225016/Free_tool_restores_Start_button_to_Windows_8 [computerworld.com]

    It is made by the same people who made Window Blinds and it supposedly adds a "Start" button to Windows 8. So if you are one of those people that misses the "Start" button then your answer lies above.

I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the demigodic party. -- Dennis Ritchie

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