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Media Mozilla Music Linux

Nightingale Media Player Preview Released 79

Posted by samzenpus
from the free-video dept.
First time accepted submitter ilikenwf writes "You may or may not remember the Mozilla-based Songbird media player, which dropped official Linux support in April, 2010. Since then, the Nightingale community fork has waxed and waned in terms of membership and progress, but thanks to having a completely new dev team has today produced a preview build based on Songbird 1.8.1. The team promises a release of a Songbird trunk based build later this year, with fixes and an upgrade to Gecko 6. Plans to support Linux, Windows, and Mac are in the works, with the preview builds being available only for Linux and Windows at the moment. Aside from trying to pull in refugees from the Songbird community, Nightingale wants more developers to aid in fixing dropped and broken features from Songbird — and to add new ones."
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Nightingale Media Player Preview Released

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  • by John Sokol (109591) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @08:44PM (#38392524) Homepage Journal

    I interviewed with them down in Santa Monica maybe 4 years back. They had hired the WinAmp guys and they were working on a media player with HTML integration in it. It really didn't seem like all that good of an idea.

    HTML 5 Makes most of that obsolete and most of what I see people doing like Apps, Flash, download players etc.

    To be honest, I only have a Yahoo Account just for IM and have never even looked to see what they are doing with Music these days.

    I still think the Original Napster was the best service, if there were such a service for a flat rate I'd be a happy camper.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      all the whizzbang(needless extra shit) in winamp is html.

    • by Alarash (746254)
      Well they should ask their Winamp friends why their software crashes when it imports the 80GB+ of music I store on my NAS, when Winamp imports it like a breeze.
  • by geminidomino (614729) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @09:19PM (#38392880) Journal

    Anyone know if the windows version supports adding/removing files from an iPod classic? Still trying to find a tool that's not shit for that particular purpose...

    • by Anonymous Coward
      I don't think it does by default - but I think it'd be easy to port the Songbird 1.8.1 ipod extension to work with it... From talking in their IRC channel, it sounds like that's one of their top priorities after upgrading to Gecko 6
    • by gl4ss (559668)

      winamp handles classic ipods quite well.

      by quite well I mean 12343242352 light years and 23432423432423% better than itunes(transcodes too if you have some ipod unfriendly media). not sure about video support though, but itunes handles that like crap anyways..

      I think it uses that some mlpod(or something) library for it, so other players should have support too.

    • by Hatta (162192)

      It's not the tool that's shit, it's the hardware that's shit. It should be dead simple to delete data from a storage device, any storage device that makes it complicated is garbage.

  • by ADRA (37398) on Friday December 16, 2011 @01:00AM (#38394374)

    1. Stability
    First time importing my songs: Crash
    Second time importing my songs: Went fine

    2. Online Integration
    All the help / addons / web integration stuff seems to be no-show. The pages are 404's, empty, or wiki not found's...

    3. Video Playback (or lack thereof)
    Attempted to load some videos and it constantly complained about not having the codecs to play them. The 'solution' given was to visit the Wiki page... which doesn't exist...

    Well, at least the media playback and selection works more or less after getting started. Its not in a state which I'd consider switching, but it has at least some potential.

  • Please... Try to make gapless MP3 playback work. Or if it's the fault of the underlying engine, file bugs against it; you are better positioned to understand the issues.

    <semi-rant> I remember that it took Apple ages to fix this in iPods and iTunes; then they finally did when the 2nd gen Nano was released. But it stayed fixed after that. There are rumors that some versions of gstreamer had functional gapless MP3, but it later broke and nobody bothered to fix it. Why is it so difficult? Does nobody noti

    • by SpzToid (869795)

      Clementine has this option. Under Preferences > Playback > Fading

      Check ON 'Cross-fade when changing tracks automatically. Default between songs is 2000 ms and is adjustable.

      • by Per Wigren (5315) on Friday December 16, 2011 @03:25AM (#38395006) Homepage
        gapless != cross-fade. An MP3 stream is divided into frames that are larger than CD frames. If a song ends in the middle of a frame, that frame is padded with silence which cause an audio dropout when playing albums with continuous sound, like live recordings for example. Most modern MP3 encoders (at least LAME) use a non-standard (but nowadays defacto-standard) tag to store the exact byte on which the song ends so players can skip the silent padding and play the album just like the original CD would had. Worth noting is that this problem is MP3-specific. All modern codecs/containers already handle this natively.
        • As a totally off-topic question, why was MP3 designed with such large frames? To me it would have made sense to have fixed them to the CD, or to an integer divisor of them, since it must have been obvious from the start that a large use for MP3 would be storing audio from CDs?

          • by Anonymous Coward

            As a totally off-topic question, why was MP3 designed with such large frames? To me it would have made sense to have fixed them to the CD, or to an integer divisor of them, since it must have been obvious from the start that a large use for MP3 would be storing audio from CDs?

            The discrete cosine transform that mp3 uses typically requires about 512 samples to effectively capture the necessary coefficients that represent a statistically coherent unit of audio, or "frame" in mp3's terminology. So, it's a technical constraint, not a design one. Smaller frames wouldn't be able to accurately sample low frequencies.

            Also, there wouldn't be much compression if you had 44100 frames per second, would it?

            • Thanks very much.

              And a very good point about the number of frames :)

            • The discrete cosine transform that mp3 uses typically requires about 512 samples to effectively capture the necessary coefficients that represent a statistically coherent unit of audio, or "frame" in mp3's terminology.

              That seems reasonable and I'll take your word for it. In practice, then, an MP3 frame is about 1/80th of a second (41,000 samples/sec / 512 samples/frame ~= 80 frames/second)? If so, a completely empty extra frame between two tracks would inject 12ms of silence between songs. Is that noticeable enough to be an issue?

    • by Tapewolf (1639955)

      Please... Try to make gapless MP3 playback work. .... Does nobody notice? Does anybody listen to, say, Pictures at an Exhibition? (You'd notice.) Sigh.</semi-rant>

      Yes, and yes. This is one of my criteria for a media player. Currently I'm using MOC (MOCP under Ubuntu since it conflicts with QT's Meta Object Compiler). It's not the prettiest thing in the world, but it does do gapless playback and it doesn't require everything to be stuffed into some kind of media library first (this makes it handy if you need to scan through a bunch of sound clips or something).

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      If you want gapless mp3, you can still use XMMS. The xmms-crossfade [eisenlohr.org] plugin also handles gapless output.

  • and get on with your life.
  • One big reason I use VLC as my usual media player: it has decent pitch control / speed control built in. So, I can listen to podcasts or audiobooks a bit faster, and yank back a few minutes of time.

    Also good for guilty pleasures like sit-coms; much nicer to watch The Big Bang Theory in 17 minutes instead of 22. (And if I could find versions with the laugh-track missing, I think it might be down to about 9 ...)

    timothy

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