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Ubuntu Moves To Yahoo For Default Firefox Search 370

Posted by kdawson
from the can-you-say-bing dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Starting in Ubuntu's Lucid Lynx release, Firefox's default search engine will be switched from Google to Yahoo. The switch was made after Canonical 'negotiated a revenue sharing deal with Yahoo.' Google will still be available as a choice. Since Yahoo search is now powered by Microsoft's Bing, this would seem to mean that Microsoft will be paying people for using Ubuntu."
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Ubuntu Moves To Yahoo For Default Firefox Search

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  • Great gauge (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @09:21AM (#30916112)
    Seems like a decent way for MS to track Ubuntu's growth.
  • Delicious! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by headkase (533448) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @09:23AM (#30916146)
    Microsoft paying when people use Ubuntu! Oooooh, my morning just became deliciously enriched. *Thank you* slashdot, these are the moments I know why I come here! =D
  • Re:Doesn't matter (Score:0, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @09:36AM (#30916264)

    It DOES matter (to me) for two reasons:
            a) they clearly stated that upgrades will change your existing setting to yahoo
            b) anyone who takes money from Microsoft to push Bing is on my blacklist

    Yes, 'b' is my own personal choice and others are free to disagree but 'a' should never be acceptable. But due to this, I am abandoning my Ubuntu advocacy efforts. I won't actively discourage Ubuntu use over just this transgression, but I will no longer use Ubuntu personally nor recommend it to my family, friends, employer, etc.

  • Re:Doesn't matter (Score:2, Interesting)

    by hughperkins (705005) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @09:51AM (#30916450) Homepage

    Yes because it's so much better to get people to use Windows, rather than to get them to use Ubuntu, and spend a couple of clicks changing their browser to ... well... some search engine that you prefer. I was going to say Google, but their founders seem to be selling out, so who knows what will become of Google?

    I think I know what you're saying though: I guess you've been putting lots of effort into advocating Ubuntu, and now you feel betrayed? I guess I can understand that.

    Still Ubuntu is I feel pretty cool, but I guess you could be right that accepting sponsorship indirectly Microsoft seems a little .... unwise...

  • Re:Question (Score:4, Interesting)

    by mejogid (1575619) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @09:52AM (#30916462)
    Canonical brokered a compromise with Mozilla, something about authorising their patchset, whereby they were also allowed to keep the branding. However, if a user makes further changes to Firefox and distributes it they would have to remove the branding. These terms were unacceptable to Debian but Canonical decided it was worth it to draw new users with the Firefox brand.
  • Re:Doesn't matter (Score:3, Interesting)

    by duguk (589689) <dug@nOSPam.frag.co.uk> on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @10:04AM (#30916608) Homepage Journal

    about a change that takes a single second to undo

    There's around 8 million Ubuntu users [internetnews.com]. Google has approximately 72.1% (vs 17% for Bing) [blogspot.com]

    This means 5,768,000 users will have to change their setting, meaning nearly TWO MONTHS (66.8 days) of lost time overall.

    The old way would mean about 15 days of lost time

  • Thank Goodness For (Score:2, Interesting)

    by shock1970 (1216162) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @10:07AM (#30916652)
    Tools -> Options -> Main -> Homepage
  • by Bragador (1036480) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @10:40AM (#30917090)

    As of yet, none.

    https://ixquick.com/eng/protect-privacy.html

    European Privacy Seal: On July 14th 2008 Ixquick received the first European Privacy Seal from European Data Protection Supervisor Mr. Peter Hustinx. The Seal officially confirms the privacy promises we make to our users. It makes Ixquick the first and only EU-approved search engine. Both EU Commissioner Viviane Reding and Dr.Thilo Weichert, German Privacy Commissioner complemented Ixquick on its privacy achievements.

    Certified Secure, a leading Certification Authority, has certified Ixquick's Privacy procedures. The CS Privacy Certificate has been awarded after an extensive audit.

    Ixquick has been registered with the Dutch Data Protection Authority (CBP) under number M 1346973. This Authority supervises the fair and lawful use and security of your personal data, to ensure your privacy today and in the future.

  • Re:Question (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @11:07AM (#30917474) Homepage

    Then again, it may have gone something like this:

    • Mozilla: Listen carefully, Debian. Mozilla controls everything it rests its eyes upon. It holds a trademark so massive it shakes the ground with its registration, so vast it drinks the coke machine dry. All the God-King Mozilla requires is this: a simple offering of signing an agreement. A token of Debian's submission to the trademark on the Firefox name.
    • Debian: Submission. Well, that's a bit of a problem. See, rumor has it that signing an agreement with Mozilla means that we would no longer be able to make changes to the version of Firefox we distribute and that clearly violates both our Social Contract and the Free Software Guidelines [debian.org].
    • Debian: And of course Debian... has its reputation to consider.

    But I wasn't there so I don't know either. It's entirely possible that the whole event was just a simple adjustment meant to reconcile two conflicting requirements -- That Debian software remain unquestionably Free and that the Mozilla group retain control over the Firefox, Thunderbird, SeaMonkey and SunBird trademarks so as to ensure the high quality of software distributed under their names. But then it wouldn't be nearly as exciting to watch and people would get bored.

    It's much more fun to imagine that license discussions were conducted while all parties had their shirts off and were threatening one another with giant Q-Tips while the Star Trek fight music played in the background.

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

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