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Mandriva Linux

Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring Released 191

Posted by kdawson
from the fresh-bits dept.
AdamWill writes "Mandriva is proud to announce the release of Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring. Download the hybrid live / install One or the purely free / open source software Free. Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring includes the latest software (KDE 3.5.6, GNOME 2.18, Firefox and Thunderbird 2.0) and several major new features: Metisse, the most innovative accelerated 3D desktop technology; open source telephony with WengoPhone; Google desktop applications including Picasa and Earth; updates and improvements to many of the Mandriva configuration tools, and the brand new drakvirt for configuring virtualization; significantly improved hardware support, including greatly improved graphics card detection and support for several common laptop memory card readers; and a brand new desktop theme. Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring is available in the full range of editions, including the freely downloadable One and Free, as well as the commercial Discovery, Powerpack and Powerpack+. For more information see the Spring product page and the Wiki page, where you can find download and installation instructions, the Release Tour, the Release Notes and the Errata."
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Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring Released

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  •   If more distros like Mandriva include compositing window managers then Ubuntu is royally boned. And it is time for Gnome and KDE to start including some of Beryl, Compiz or Metisse's features into their window managers.

    It is the next step in Linux distro evolution.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Dionysus (12737)
      With Feisty.
      To install beryl in Kubuntu: aptitude install beryl-kubuntu
      To install beryl in Ubuntu: aptitude install beryl-ubuntu

      To start beryl, type beryl-manager in a terminal.

      That's it.
      • by Knuckles (8964)
        To install beryl in Ubuntu: aptitude install beryl-ubuntu. To start beryl, type beryl-manager in a terminal.

        Except if you have a vid card w/o good 3D drivers. Either you are SOL, or, if you have an ATi, have to jump through hoops to get Xgl working instead of AIGLX. And after you have set it up, it still has many, MANY usability issues. It's nice stuff, but years from being polished enough for the masses.
        • by Knuckles (8964)
          Just want to add, for the benefit of anyone pursuing Beryl on Ubuntu with an ATi card, that the beryl packages in feisty do not support running on Xgl, you need to get the Ubuntu packages from the beryl homepage.
  • I'm sick of Linux (Score:4, Interesting)

    by tsa (15680) on Wednesday April 18, 2007 @02:17AM (#18778591) Homepage
    I've been using Linux for ten years now and I get more and more disappointed by it. Ten years ago there weren't many user-friendly distros out and I started with Slackware. I'm still very happy my friend dragged me into using that because I am now a savvy *nix amateur. But! During the last ten years I kept hearing that, yes, Linux is now really almost ready for the desktop, and world domination is just around the corner. I tried some other distros over the years (Suse, Redhat), but I kept coming back to Slackware. About a year ago I changed to Ubuntu because I didn't like all the configuration I had to do after every Slackware upgrade anymore. 'Ubuntu works out of the box!' the website assured me. After install I spent hours getting X to work right. It only wanted to run in 1024x768 @ 60 Hz. Thanks to my experience with Slackware and my backups I could edit xorg.conf to fix that. Now I have a working install, but Ubuntu is so slow that it's a pain to use. And I haven't been able to watch a movie on it yet. Configuring Gnome was a pain, and there isn't much documentation on how to start on the Ubuntu website either. I find the whole Ubuntu experience very disappointing. The only thing that keeps me from changing to a Mac completely (I have a MacBook Pro which I love) is the lack of choice in hardware. Changing to Windows is of course no option; I never understood why that OS is used so much. So I keep using Linux, but I almost never use my main machine as anything other than a file server anymore. Linux is very good at that, no matter which distro you use.
    • by Vintermann (400722) on Wednesday April 18, 2007 @02:48AM (#18778735) Homepage
      Perhaps you could try... oh, I don't know, Mandriva?

      I use it, wouldn't switch to a mac for the world. They don't even have the keys where they should be!
    • Changing to Windows is of course no option; I never understood why that OS is used so much.

      Perhaps for all the reasons you just mentioned: You don't have to spend hours getting the window manager to work right. It doesn't want to run in only 1024x768@60hz. You don't need to manually edit an xorg.conf, or have the experience required to do so. You can watch movies on it very easily. Configuring the shell isn't a pain. There is plenty of choice in hardware.

      Remind me again why Windows is no option?

      Side note: N
      • by tsa (15680)
        All the things you mention I have on the Mac. Plus, no spyware, malware etc thanks to a fantastic OS that is not defective by design.
      • by WaZiX (766733)
        Funny, the only OS I have ever had problems with to set resolution is windows. For some reason I just couldn't find a way to get my resolution back to 1280x800 after updating my drivers. Oh and installing an external monitor with 1440x900 was also an incredible pain...

        Come to think of it, having an easily editable xorg.conf makes things MUCH easier, no need to mess with installing monitors, then making the OS somehow recognize what monitor it is, just edit a couple of lines (and xorg.conf is one of the m
      • Perhaps for all the reasons you just mentioned: You don't have to spend hours getting the window manager to work right. It doesn't want to run in only 1024x768@60hz. You don't need to manually edit an xorg.conf, or have the experience required to do so. You can watch movies on it very easily. Configuring the shell isn't a pain. There is plenty of choice in hardware.

        From the outset, I'm not going to in any way deny that Linux isn't ready for the "Joe Bloke" user and my personal feeling is that it never wil

    • by Vskye (9079)
      I've also been using Linux forever, since the pre-1.0 days. As you said, as a server it is rock solid, but as a normal desktop computer it is somewhat less forgiving. On the other hand, I've been using kubuntu for the past couple years and it works well for me, and have had only a few issues with upgrading to LCD and a new nvidia card, and even that wasn't bad, since I'm familiar with xorg.conf. (a normal joe user would have gave up though) Another funny comparison is that I bought a iMac this year, what so
      • by tsa (15680)
        That's interesting, you have the same Linux 'career' as I have. For me the bash prompt was also a selling point for OS X. I bought an old iMac G3 and put OS 10.3 (I guess it was) on it. After some fiddling around with that thing I bought an iBook. If you could easily upgrade the videocard in an iMac I would have bought one last year. I play a lot of adventure games, and although they're not really heavy on the graphics card they get more demanding all the time. Now I have a windows/Linux box that I use as a
      • by jZnat (793348) *
        Just to let you know: if you're used to using Bash 3.x (I use 3.2 for example), Mac OS X uses bash 2.05. Tab completion, colours, and other goodies don't work so well in Bash 2. Therefore, if you want to experience the full Bash, uh, experience, then make sure to download it [gnu.org] (along with Xcode in order to compile it).

        If you don't mind the differences between the two versions, then you probably shouldn't waste your time with an updated Bash. Since I already had Xcode installed, and I already know how to co
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by WaZiX (766733)
      You've been using linux for 10 years and it took you hours to fix your xorg.conf?

      How hard is it to add a couple of "widthxheight" in a text file? Or even easier: to run dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg so you can add them by just selecting the resolution (and giving your monitor refresh rates at the same time).

      Oh, and by the way, if you had fired up an IRC client and connected to #ubuntu, it would have probably taken you 5 minutes tops.
      • by xtracto (837672)
        How hard is it to add a couple of "widthxheight" in a text file?

        As hard as it was to type xcopy a:\dir c:\docs /E /V /C On MSDOS, and how changing that for *click* Edit/copy, *right-click* paste in windows made it easier.

        It is easy when you know that adding *wdhtxlhegt=23131" in the *xrghdpg.xcfngh* file under the "/etc/xconklfg" folder is going to solve your problems. But you see, the problem is how the heck do you get to know how to do that... For some things it might be easy to know the commands wit
        • by WaZiX (766733)
          so, opening a text file, scrolling down and editing a text file, is hard? I mean the guy apparently has been using linux for _10_ years! And if you need help and can't find it easily, just drop by an IRC channel (as I said), people answer those types of questions all the time. Linux by design lets you change manually your config files, and guess what, it makes things, much MUCH more easier and transparent. Just because you've been dumbed out to the point of extreme laziness doesn't mean the rest of the worl
        • by jZnat (793348) *
          xrandr is a frontend to the RandR (Resize and Rotate) X11 extension. There are plenty of applets for it (I know KDE has one called krandr included in kdebase), although I know that it would be nearly impossible for anyone not familiar with X to know the name of the tool. A simple search for "resize rotate screen linux" gives a top result for xrandr's man page on Google, so I'd hope that most people know how to use search engines to see if anything solves their problem.
    • by Graftweed (742763)
      Well, if you use your "main machine" only as a file server, then it isn't really your main machine anymore, is it? :)

      I'm in a situation similar to yours. I've also used Slackware for as long as I've been using Linux and even though I've used all sorts of other distros, including SUSE at work, I keep coming back to it. I also use OS X heavily since my laptop is a Mac and I run pretty much the same set of tools there as I do in Slackware.

      If you're comparing OS X to Linux in terms of desktop use (i.e. users wh
      • by tsa (15680)
        Well, if you use your "main machine" only as a file server, then it isn't really your main machine anymore, is it? :)

        Nope, you're right. Besides, the MacBook Pro is by far the fastest computer I've ever had. Much faster than the game machine / fileserver. But before the MBP I used the iMac G3 I had to type my stories and books in. Giving away that thing was a bad mistake. I'm now working on my next book, on the MBP. Typing on a laptop sucks even more than I had imagined. I could of course use my Ubuntu mach
        • by Graftweed (742763)
          Exactly the opposite for me, I have a Powerbook G4 and consider its keyboard among the best I've ever used (Thinkpads are also nice).

          As for the room being cold, there's an easy solution for that:

          1. Turn on the Macbook Pro in there
          2. Open a terminal
          3. Run "openssl speed"
          4. Enjoy your new tropical climate ;)
        • by swillden (191260) *

          Typing on a laptop sucks even more than I had imagined.

          So plug a full-sized keyboard into it!

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by advid.net (595837)
      I've been using Linux for ten years now also: from Linux Mandrake v5 (1998).

      I'm still regularly frustrated by some problems that come again and again with each release, it is tiring, yes. But I'm not sick with it yet. Really good job have been done, some features are wonderful (drak-* and package management is 98% operational), uptime is good, custom adjustments unbeatable.

      And as you said it "Linux is now really almost ready for the desktop, and world domination is just around the corner", so keep the fai

      • by muszek (882567)

        I've been using Linux for ten years now also: from Linux Mandrake v5 (1998)


        I, for one, welcome our new time-travelling overlords! Could you please tell us if 2007 was the year of Linux on the desktop?
    • And I haven't been able to watch a movie on it yet.

      Use easyubuntu (I think it's a package in multiverse, failing that google it). It works pretty well to get stuff like flash plugin and multimedia stuff working. Also, the Ubuntu Guide [ubuntuguide.org] is pretty good as far as documentation goes.

      A few weeks ago my windows install here in work crapped itself and I thought I might as well give Ubuntu a go. It's great! Much faster and I've my system set up exactly the way I want it to. Having said that though, if I had the choi

    • by Nimey (114278)
      What's your hardware (CPU, RAM, video card, monitor) on that Ubuntu box? Mostly curious.
      • by tsa (15680)
        1300 MHz Duron, 512 MB, GeForce 5600 FX videocard. It should be fast enough, but it's sluggish, especially booting it takes a long time. The machine works good as a file server so I'm not in a hurry to tweak it or reinstall it. It's just annoying that Windows on the same box feels nimbler. I don't like windows but I need it for games.
    • by petrus4 (213815)
      I tried some other distros over the years

      There's your mistake. To quote the Old Testament...
      "Remember your first love."

      Although I must admit that apostasy is something that I also have been guilty of in this case as well. Slackware was my first distribution, and although I've tried numerous others including Linux From Scratch, (and have an installation of Ubuntu on my system as we speak) there's just always been something intangible missing. To paraphrase another deeply corny saying, "Once you've had Sla

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