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Red Hat Software Businesses Linux

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Version 7.5 Released (redhat.com) 64

On Tuesday Red Hat announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux version 7.5. An anonymous reader writes: Serving as a consistent foundation for hybrid cloud environments, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 provides enhanced security and compliance controls, tools to reduce storage costs, and improved usability, as well as further integration with Microsoft Windows infrastructure both on-premise and in Microsoft Azure.

New features include a large combination of Ansible Automation with OpenSCAP, and LUKS-encrypted removable storage devices can be now automatically unlocked using NBDE. The Gnome shell has been re-based to version 3.26, the Kernel version is 3.10.0-862, and the kernel-alt packages include kernel version 4.14 with support for 64-bit ARM, IBM POWER9 (little endian), and IBM z Systems, while KVM virtualization is now supported on IBM POWER8/POWER9 systems.

See the detailed release notes here.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Version 7.5 Released

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  • "tools to reduce storage costs"

    • by Anonymous Coward
      Use CentOS, FreeNAS or any thing else free, it's another way to save licence cost.
      • "Use CentOS, FreeNAS or any thing else free, it's another way to save licence cost."

        This really depends on many factors. For example, it is cheaper to run Red Hat Virtualisation with unlimited supported RHEL VMs than VMWare (with the same featureset) with unsupported (e.g. CentOS) VMs.

        (Of course, if you want no support at all, you could run oVirt on CentOS, but I know of shops spending huge amounts on VMWare and trying to save money by running unsupported Linux VMs).

    • Aiming for +5 funny I see. It's a kernel module called VDO: https://rhelblog.redhat.com/20... [redhat.com]
    • C'mon!
      The tool to reduce storage costs it's you, the system designer.
      Not the distribution.
      If the storage is local or remote and you pay by size), you reduce the costs at the design stage. Once you have bought those 4 disks, you cannot reduce their costs any more.
      If the storage is remote and you pay by use, you cannot reduce costs after deployment. Only increase.
      If deduplication is the keywork to "to reduce storage costs", then you'd better think: why do I need deduplication?

      No way, data compression is the o

  • I Hope (Score:4, Informative)

    by jmccue ( 834797 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @10:46AM (#56436529) Homepage
    I hope the replaced kernel 3.10.0-693.21.1.el7.x86_64 with a better kernel :). For some laptops models, DRI had to be disabled in X to prevent hangs. That kernel was applied in 7.3 to fix a vulnerability and was carried over to 7.4.
    • Was the problem due to an issue with the kernel, or an issue with the laptops? Because 'better kernel' is kind of a loaded term.
      • by jmccue ( 834797 )
        The older kernel worked, 693 had issues with Nvidia (who else). We are not suppose to install the Nvidia binary, so that hardware is 'stuck'. These are models with discrete graphics which cannot be disabled. disabled means setting the bios to use integrated graphics
        • "We are not suppose to install the Nvidia binary, so that hardware is 'stuck'."

          I sounds much easier to just install the nvidia driver to see if that works, even if you are not "supposed to".

          (The only machine I have with an nvidia card now is an old Ion chipset, but I previously ran a linux workstation with an Nvidia card, and had no stability problems with the nvidia driver.)

    • It looks like they have a 3.10.0-862 kernel and a 4.14.0-49 kernel-alt.

      https://access.redhat.com/docu... [redhat.com]

    • why in earth would you use an enterprise / server side distro for a laptop?

      • by arth1 ( 260657 )

        why in earth would you use an enterprise / server side distro for a laptop?

        RHEL Workstation is a good OS for laptops, especially if you want to maintain binary and package version compatibility with your servers.
        Development is a good example of where this is useful. Automounts that contain binaries and/or libraries is another. And remote X. Sometimes compatibility wins over bleeding edge.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          why in earth would you use an enterprise / server side distro for a laptop?

          RHEL Workstation is a good OS for laptops, especially if you want to maintain binary and package version compatibility with your servers.
          Development is a good example of where this is useful. Automounts that contain binaries and/or libraries is another. And remote X. Sometimes compatibility wins over bleeding edge.

          RHEL won't work on hardware that is released after it was. You'll get warnings at boot time and your hardware will not work. Software updates will not fix the problems because the updates are not coming. RHEL is for certified hardware and you can't certify hardware that doesn't exist yet.

      • by jmccue ( 834797 )
        These are using RHEL Developer Workstations
      • I use Centos on everything from laptops to desktops to servers of various kinds, from webservers to a custom RIP for a publishing company that I wrote a few years ago -- everything runs on Centos.

        I know how Centos works and what it does and how to administer it, and what it's doing in the background (no mysterious processes) and it's very stable so I don't have worry about cutting-edge bugs or reformatting a machine and setting it up again from scratch since the lifetime of a Centos version is about the sam

        • The only downside to me is that also means you might be a couple years behind the most current version of something, missing out on some features. In a lot of cases, it's in a third party repo, but on more than a few times, ffmpeg was a PITA. SSL and webserver features as well missing without latest versions. It's my server of choice. I'd recommend Fedora for laptop on current hardware, though .
          • by swimboy ( 30943 )

            That's why RH implemented Software Collections. The base install may contain an older stable-when-the-distro-was-new version of software, but a supplementary repo that's maintained by RH provides more current versions of most major tools. It's a couple of steps more involved than just "yum install python-3.6.5" but it's there and supported by RedHat.

    • The current Oracle UEKr4 is a v4.1.12 kernel, and can be loaded in a supported configuration with Ksplice on a Red Hat system.

      The preview of the UEKr5 is a 4.14.26 kernel (the Long Term Support release). That is in beta.

      You can find installation instructions here [linuxjournal.com] for both versions.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    RHEL chose to create a new subscription just for ansible, one that contains with "ansible" with the same package name and version as the recently ansible package in EPEL. The result is that the RHEL version, and the EPEL version, are going to fight it out for installation supremacy on any system that has the upstream channel and the EPEL channel both enabled.

    This was avoidable: it's exactly the sort of thing that the engineer who set up the new channel should have looked for. It's also why I loathe the sub

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 14, 2018 @11:21AM (#56436667)

    In the "Deprecated Functionality" chapter, it is mentioned that Python 2 will not be shipped in the OS:

    * https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/7/html/7.5_release_notes/chap-red_hat_enterprise_linux-7.5_release_notes-deprecated_functionality

    If you need it in RHEL 8, you need to either get it via EPEL, another third-party repo, or compile-from-source.

    • "In the "Deprecated Functionality" chapter, it is mentioned that Python 2 will not be shipped in the OS:"

      That's because it is already deprecated upstream and will receive no upstream support after 1 Jan 2020 (https://pythonclock.org/). If RHEL8 were to ship with Python 2.7, it would be supported for about 1/10th of the OS support lifetime, which does seems unreasonable.

      "If you need it in RHEL 8, you need to either get it via EPEL, another third-party repo, or compile-from-source."

      No, if you're going to need

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I absolutely agree with you that going to python 3 is the right solution.

        That being said Red Hat's ability to support python 2 in rhel is not dependent on whether or not python upstream still supports it. One of the main reasons why Red Hat is able to charge a lot of money for its subscription services is that they have competent people on staff that can support things like this long after upstream has dropped its support.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I've been a sysadmin since 1998, and I've since switched over to CentOS for a Red Hat replacement. If your shop knows Linux, CentOS is a breeze, easier, actually, since there are no licenses to muck about with in rolling out servers. If you know Red Hat, you know CentOS. And before the naysayers stipulate use of Red Hat in critical environments, CentOS handles this area very well, as it's based on Red Hat, just minus the badging, licensing, some tooling.

    For me, it's come down to CentOS on the servers, Check

    • Re:Just use CentOS (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Junta ( 36770 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @04:11PM (#56437893)

      There are a few reasons to buy RHEL:

      -You don't know what you are doing and you are going to be paying *someone* to know what they are doing. Many may believe that such a Linux customer is a unicorn, but I have seen many people relying heavily upon their enterprise vendor.
      -You need urgent human attention to problems as they arise. Recently I worked with a company that needed to understand the root cause of a kernel panic they were hitting *immediately*, and RedHat was there for that.
      -To pass the buck when things do go south.

      You are correct that from a technical perspective, CentOS is all the capability but none of the hassle. It just doesn't have any of the guaranteed human attention, and that is really what you are paying for. All that said, their entitlement scheme is terribly convoluted and even if I would be willing to pay, it's enough to make me not want to use them.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        OP here. Great comments. I agree to a point on the human help element, but I've never ran into something so critical that me and the team couldn't solve. Since all of our servers are virtualised, if we ran into something *critical*, we would likely just activate a hot spare until we could get it all sorted. This has happened maybe twice in almost 20 years. We keep things simple, as we are all old-school *nix mentality guys. Each server does one thing only. Our servers don't share duties. The Asterisk server

    • On an unrelated note, isn't "agro" slang for "aggressive" rather than "aggravation?"
  • My 6.9 servers and workstations are still as solid as a rock. Granted I need to add allot of newer rpms but it is stable and everything works as it should.

    My confidence level of stability and bugs is still lower with 7.4. They should focus more on bug fixes and making 7.x as stable as 6. If I had my wish they would also get rid of systemd and go back to init.

    .

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