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Microsoft Releases First Public Preview of RTVS Under MIT and GPLv2 Licenses (microsoft.com) 57

shutdown -p now writes: Microsoft has released the first public preview of RTVS (R Tools for Visual Studio), an extension for Visual Studio that adds support for the R (GNU S) programming language. The product is open source, and while most of the code is under the MIT license, some components are GPLv2, in accordance with the R license. That's not the first time this week (or this year) that Microsoft's open source efforts have been front-page news; with its new role in the Eclipse Foundation, too, the company's angling toward being one of the largest open source companies around, even if that's a small part of its business model. Update: 03/09 19:03 GMT by T : Speaking of which: reader Salgak1 writes with his first submission, linking the Register's report that Microsoft has released a Debian-based Linux distro, called SONIC. "It is optimized for network switching, and apparently is a localized version of the "Azure Cloud Switch" released into the Azure cloud hosting system. Question is, is it just another Microsoft "Embrace, Extend. Extinguish" strategy in action?"
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Microsoft Releases First Public Preview of RTVS Under MIT and GPLv2 Licenses

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  • Someone to explain how this is a bad thing and all that jazz. MS is in the title and summary, it's going to happen.
    • Something about embracing and extending.

      Very phallic.
    • Someone already did. History and all that...
  • I miss the Bill Gates borg icon, where did it go!
  • I'm not sure how I feel about this, but this is a wonderful validation for the popularity of the R language. When I started using R almost 10 years ago, few had heard its name outside of select academic disciplines. Now, in addition to it being quite ubiquitous in academia, its something that I list as a main skill on my resume.
    • I've only been using R for a short time - about a year. But I'm excited by this - and MS' new foray towards true open-source.

      I quickly found RStudio - simply because the basic R shell/gui was difficult to use. RStudio was nice and very helpful plus the team turned out new releases. My excitement is MS' wallet and pushing money into this - R should improve.

      As for embrace & extend - R could use a bit of consolidation & simplification. There are many ways to do things and not all of them compatible

  • Well Duh! if it isn't the first time this week then it obviously isn't the first time this year, The more logical way to say this would have been to swap the two time frames. Nice editing Tim.
  • I know, everybody is waiting for the other shoe to drop, but there is none. The strategy here is obvious. Grow usage of Azure and displace Amazon. This means being pragmatic about platforms and gaining developer mindshare. There's billions of dollars to business to be had and Microsoft is ahead of the curve.

    And it's a good story from a developer standpoint and it's getting better. Currently, where I'm at, they are still busy testing and doing proof of concepts, trying to set stuff up in Amazon, when they co

  • I understand the EEE logic, and that was the MS MO for a long time. But Linux has established itself as an enterprise mainstay, and if I were in their shoes, I would make sure that their products could work on the operating systems that their customers use. They would like to extinguish, but they can't, so they need to join them.

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