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Open Source Operating Systems Security Software Linux

Linux Kernel 2.6.32 LTS Reaches End of Life In February 2016 (softpedia.com) 116

An anonymous reader writes: The oldest long-term supported Linux kernel branch finally reaches end of life next month, but before going into the deepest darkest corners of the Internet, it just dropped one more maintenance release, Linux kernel 2.6.32.70 LTS. Willy Tarreau dropped the news about the release of Linux kernel 2.6.32.70 LTS on January 29, 2016, informing all us that this will most likely be the last maintenance release in the series, as starting with February 2016 it will no longer be supported with security patches and bugfixes. Linux 2.6 first came out in December, 2003, and 2.6.16 (the first long-term release) in March 2006.
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Linux Kernel 2.6.32 LTS Reaches End of Life In February 2016

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  • by fnj ( 64210 )

    What happens to RHEL6?

    • Re:RHEL6 (Score:4, Insightful)

      by whoever57 ( 658626 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @03:00AM (#51407579) Journal

      What happens to RHEL6?

      Red Hat will back port fixes, just like they do with many, many packages.

      • Re:RHEL6 (Score:5, Informative)

        by kthreadd ( 1558445 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @03:23AM (#51407637)
        They already do that. The 2.6.32 kernel that you get in RHEL 6 is not exactly the same 2.6.32 that you get from kernel.org. There are many backported features already implemented that the upstream kernel does not include.
        • by Junta ( 36770 )

          Much to my chagrin when I have to do out-of-tree stuff that seeks kernel-devel as '2.6.32' and says 'oh, then I need to define stuff that wasn't defined in 2.6.32' only to break the compile because RHEL backported all sorts of stuff, and still call it '2.6.32'. This has always bugged me about RHEL, they end up with something that doesn't map to kernel.org version at *all*, but the version still suggests otherwise.

          SuSE stopped that stuff and actually upgraded the kernel when they felt the features were read

    • Re:RHEL6 (Score:5, Informative)

      by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @03:02AM (#51407585) Homepage Journal

      What happens to RHEL6?

      EL6 will still be supported by Red Hat and Scientific Linux for many years to come.

      There are alternatives, like Gentoo, but for inexplicable reasons, Gentoo has dropped support for kernel 3.2, which is currently the kernel with the longest remaining support (until May 2018).

      4.4, the second most LTS, is too bleeding edge for many. If the goal is to keep a system with max uptime, but still get critical kernel fixes if and only if needed, the best bet might be to stay at EL6 for now.

      • Gentoo is a bleeding edge, rolling release distribution. They do not keep old versions of any package around.

  • by creimer ( 824291 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @03:07AM (#51407601) Homepage
    I had no idea that Linux had a Windows XP mode.
    • by Nexion ( 1064 )

      LMAO

    • by dwywit ( 1109409 )

      Oh, yeah. As long as users refuse to upgrade *cough*digital cinema*cough*, there'll be jaw-dropping amongst the community.

      Still using 2.6.13 under Fedora. Apparently we users (projectionists) aren't to be trusted with our own equipment, so no root access, and we get an upgrade every three years or so, whenever we scream loud enough and promise to pay for it.

      To their credit, the "upgrade" includes a calibration of sound+vision, so there's that.

  • by Misagon ( 1135 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @05:56AM (#51407969)

    I still run an old Ubuntu LTS install with Linux 2.6.32, but that is mostly because so that I would not have to run a Ubuntu version with that abomination called "Unity" or Gnome 3. I could not see that Ubuntu had offered any upgrade path to another LTS release that would not force any of that crap upon me. I also did not want to get a system that was a mix of installs from different sources.
    My old Ubuntu has served me well for this time. Time to look around for some other distribution then... Mint?

    BTW. At work I installed CentOS 6 on a brand new machine, this Thursday. I installed CentOS 7 first but gave it up because of Gnome 3.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I recommend just installing XFCE on Ubuntu, but Mint is also an option if you're a Gnome2 fan.

    • I'm running ubuntu 14.04 with fvwm. Unity is the default but it's easy to switch. There's no need to run an a ancient system. I'll a almost certainly upgrade to 16.04 when the time comes.

    • by Maow ( 620678 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @09:20AM (#51408419) Journal

      I still run an old Ubuntu LTS install with Linux 2.6.32, but that is mostly because so that I would not have to run a Ubuntu version with that abomination called "Unity" or Gnome 3. I could not see that Ubuntu had offered any upgrade path to another LTS release that would not force any of that crap upon me.

      My mom runs 10.04 and is a long way away, so I tested in a VM

      do-release-upgrade

      Which brought the VM to 12.04, then I ran it again, bringing the VM to 14.04.

      Then something like

      sudo apt-get install mate-desktop

      And it worked. I did the entire process multiple times to be sure, and documented it on a web site somewhere.

      One issue was in trying to remove Unity via sudo apt-get remove unity.

      In one instance it caused an issue, in another it worked. Might have been a mistake I made.

      But there is an update path available.

      also did not want to get a system that was a mix of installs from different sources.

      I did have to add the Mate repo if I recall, but they're pretty trust-worthy; I wouldn't consider it problematic.

      Worth a try!

    • by Junta ( 36770 )

      The lack of updates for upstream 2.6.32 is the least of your worries for running Lucid.

      One, unless you were compiling your own kernel, the efforts after April of last year upstream had no bearing on your distro, since they weren't bothering to pull it in anyway.

      For another, the kernel is but one of a huge chunk of unmaintained code in a distro that gave up it's last bit of support April last year.

      If you want new but familiar, choose a MATE environment. It carries on the traditional experience the best. Yo

    • If you're not in a hurry / don't really need to care you may wait for Ubuntu 16.04 (Ubuntu Mate) or Mint 18 Mate.

  • Will this still run on the 80386, which was the original goal of Linux?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      By that metric, Linux is indeed a failure.

    • 2.6.32.70 should. 80386 support was dropped in 3.5.y and further.

      Please note that no mainstream distro has supported the 386 in the past couple decades. You'll have to be building all your own stuff to get it working.

  • ... about version 2.6.32? Was it the last one that didn't have systemd? Or something else? I know that Linus jumped to version 3 after that, and so on, but aside from that leap, is there anything else about 2.6.32 that makes it so special that dropping support for it is newsworthy?
    • 2.6.39 was actually the one that directly preceded 3.0 ;)

      Nothing particularly special about 2.6.32 compared to the others, but it just happened to be one release in which all the major enterprise distributions landed on for one release cycle (Debian 6, RHEL 6, SLES 11, ...). That fact alone just kind of drove to keeping it maintained officially, and everyone on those distributions could stay happy with new upstream kernels of that series without breaking any sort of compatibility on their systems (eg, any k

      • In fact my own usage in my projects as well as at my company has justified to take it over till last summer. And since Moritz and Ben from the debian LTS team have done an incredible job at feeding me with security backports for free, when Ben told me that debian 6 would be maintained till february, I found it the least I could do to pursue its maintenance for a few extra months to return the favor. So the fact that it's been used by debian has indeed justified 6 more months, which is nice already.

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