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Graphics Open Source Games Linux

Super Mario Inspired SuperTux Issues Its First Official Release In 10 Years (phoronix.com) 116

An anonymous reader writes: SuperTux, the free software game inspired by Nintendo's Super Mario Brothers, has put out its first stable release in a decade. SuperTux 0.4 rewrites the game engine to make use of OpenGL, SDL2, and other modern open-source game tech. SuperTux 0.4 additionally features a lot of new in-game content, an in-game download manager, and support for translations. SuperTux 0.4 can be downloaded for Linux, Windows and Mac via GitHub.
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Super Mario Inspired SuperTux Issues Its First Official Release In 10 Years

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  • A remake of Penguin Adventure with Tux?

    • by ls671 ( 1122017 )

      Just like a Penguin in Bondage?

      http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics... [azlyrics.com]

    • by Ranbot ( 2648297 )

      How about we don't let a bloated knock-off of a 3 decade old game become news? Terrible shovel-ware Mario-clone games can be found on every generation of consoles, MS-Dos, Windows, Mac, Linux, handheld games, web-based platforms, Steam store, smartphone games, etc. Another mario-clone should not be a surprise to anyone or news worthy of any discussion on Slashdot.

      I suspect this was submitted by an "anonymous reader" affiliated with this terrible project.

  • TAGAP (Score:5, Informative)

    by Black LED ( 1957016 ) on Tuesday December 22, 2015 @03:22AM (#51163775)

    I prefer TAGAP

    http://www.tagap.net/ [tagap.net]

  • +64MB to do what was done in 64kB 30 years ago ? Come on, I know it's 2015, but you can do better...
    • by mark-t ( 151149 )

      Uh.... no. The NES only had 64K of addressable memory. Only a fraction of that was available for games. Super Mario Bros used a 32KB cartridge.

      More than 64K of effective memory on a cartridge was possible with bank switching (up to 1MB, switched in at 32K at a time), but Super Mario Bros did not use that.

      • by rayd75 ( 258138 )

        Uh.... no. The NES only had 64K of addressable memory. Only a fraction of that was available for games. Super Mario Bros used a 32KB cartridge.

        More than 64K of effective memory on a cartridge was possible with bank switching (up to 1MB, switched in at 32K at a time), but Super Mario Bros did not use that.

        Hardware limitations will tame bloat like nothing else. However, given some memory and CPU coupled with a drop-in framework for just about anything imaginable and the growth quickly becomes exponential. My Mario-comparable iOS "masterpiece" Cletus Land [apple.com] tallies in at 35MB. It's easy to get there and beyond when you start adding-in things like a physics engine, many times the screen resolution, quadruple the bits for color, support for several different screen layouts, etc. As I've earned about as much as th

    • Hey, at least it's not as bloated as Super Mario Maker!

      • by KGIII ( 973947 )

        It has been 30+ years. I imagine that both Mario and Luigi are a bit bloated by now. FFS, how often do you see old and skinny plumbers? They rescued the princess, settled down, had three shit-for-brains children, plus they drink wine and eat pasta all day. Of course they're friggen bloated! You would be too.

  • by InfiniteLoopCounter ( 1355173 ) on Tuesday December 22, 2015 @03:38AM (#51163797)

    I enjoyed playing Supertux with a younger family member some years back and have some good memories of the game. This includes some of the addons and the early developments into the forest levels with advanced features that were fun.

    Two things I'd like to ask if anyone knows:

    Firstly, why can't the development team put together a single website with up to date info about this game? There was a move to Berlios De and git from SVN if I remember from lethargik, and now it seems to somewhere else. However, no information is left on the other websites that explains where the current stuff is happening or which pages are now obsolete. It would make a lot of sense to clarify this even for people just downloading the game.

    Secondly: What the hell happened to Nolok? Did he really get replaced by a yeti as the main evil guy (as also in the unrelated game SupertuxKart)?

    • by grumbel ( 592662 ) <grumbel@gmx.de> on Tuesday December 22, 2015 @06:09AM (#51164077) Homepage

      Secondly: What the hell happened to Nolok?

      The same as what happened with the rest of the project, it kind of stalled. There was a lot of development after Milestone1, but that never converged into a finished release and then staled, developers left, new joined, etc., the release now is essentially a snapshot of that incomplete thing with a bit of polish. Nolok is still around and maybe one day I or somebody else will implement it, but there really isn't enough coherence in the development at the moment for that. Here is an animation test [seul.org] from seven years ago.

    • by Halo1 ( 136547 )

      Firstly, why can't the development team put together a single website with up to date info about this game?

      Google turns up http://supertuxproject.org/ [supertuxproject.org] as the first hit. It's strange the summary doesn't link it, although I guess it might have risked diverting some clicks to the phoronix page.

  • people to run their own multiplier servers.

  • Just swap the major and minor version number and call it a day. It's good enough. Even in the commercial software market companies boldly ship version 12.0 Professional Edition and it still can be a pile of garbage.
    • Having a large number does not make it more comprehensible or give you much useful information other than what is newer than before (*see Firefox).

      Open source versioning is "somewhat" standardised and I am glad that they are sticking to it (1.x for meeting all major milestones, .odd for development, .even for public release). It actually makes sense.

      The other versioning scheme that makes sense is for ongoing software by year and date release, such as Ubuntu releases.

  • Why Linux fails (Score:3, Insightful)

    by BitZtream ( 692029 ) on Tuesday December 22, 2015 @09:31AM (#51164589)

    This is an example of why Linux fails as a desktop.

    One guy in the middle of some podunk area of South Asia who doesn't want to make any money at all can turn out an insanely stupid and insanely popular game in a couple weeks by himself.

    You've got '10 years' and its on 0.4 and hardly any fun at all ...

    Open Source games are going to fail repeatedly. Artists who do the actual meat of games are not stupid enough to work on YOUR GAME for free. Without artists and story tellers guiding your way, your design by committee games are going to continue to suck. You can't just hack shit together to make a work of art.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      What you write doesn't make any sense.
      You write about open source games, give related examples, and somehow conclude that "Linux fails as a desktop".

      First of all, Linux also has Steam, with 1742 games.
      Just yesterday [gamingonlinux.com] the Linux version of Saints Row IV was released.
      And last Saturday, Slashdot mentioned [slashdot.org] Capcom's recent announcement of Street Fighter V for Linux.
      Nowadays, open source games have little to do with Linux failing as a gaming platform.

      Secondly, your remark that Linux fails as a desktop is even more

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Yea and Saints Row IV isn't open source, nor is Street Fighter V. How do these help argue against the quality of open source games?

        Also both sadly underperform compared to their windows counterparts. -- a sad linux gamer

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      How does the presence of a bad game make Linux fail as a desktop system? There are countless of games that are equally shit on both OS X and Windows, are you declaring those useless now, too?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Actually Vietnam has very cosmopolitan and "hip" cities especially Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. They are a lot more advanced than many cities in "middle America". Hardly something you would call a podunk area. Moreover, the guy who did Flappy Bird (which I assume is what you are talking about) was able to become successful due to his marketing efforts more than any coding skill or "viral luck". He, or someone affiliated with him, bought something like $5000 worth of accounts and used it to bump it on to the

    • by Kludge ( 13653 )

      Mod parent up!
      He explains well why simple games like Tetris and Candy Crush will never be popular. No story line, no 3D graphic artists, no big explosions, etc.

    • Artists who do the actual meat of games are not stupid enough to work on YOUR GAME for free.

      There's the problem....modern games are more a matter of art than of programming. If you look at the credit list for the recent release of Starcraft, there are tons of artists and relatively few programmers.

      You can't just hack shit together to make a work of art.

      Wow, that's definitely not true. Art gets hacked together all the time. Look at the recent Star Wars movie, it's a rehash with elements hacked in from all over the place. In architecture, look at the spires of Chartres Cathedral for an especially clear example. In painting [nationalgallery.org.uk] it happens too [discovery.com].

    • by KGIII ( 973947 )

      Define, if you will, "fails as a desktop." Thanks. I'm genuinely curious as to why you think it has failed.

      I'll go first:

      Success means, to me, that the end user is happy/content with the product. The number of users is irrelevant to me. I have plenty of Windows licenses and the means to buy as many as I could ever possibly want. I don't even dislike Windows. I used it for years while Linux sat mostly idle on a spare partition. I'd boot to it, update it, poke a little, and then return to Windows.

      I realized t

      • As a systems and software architect by profession, I'll chime in. My metric for success is the satisfaction of all of four constraints:

        1. system must be desirable by user (here, fill in words as "content", "happy", "enthusiastic", "prepared to pay if necessary")

        2. system must be affordable

        3. system must be feasible to the builder

        4. system must be certifiable (which is more than just "testable")

        Now I think it is not hard to see that Linux-as-a-desktop-system easily meets #2 and #3. As to meeting #4, many p

        • by KGIII ( 973947 )

          Those sound reasonable but I'm not really sure that #4 is required for success. It'd be nice though. As I recall, aren't there only a few actually certified OSes out there? I think AIX might have been/is. I haven't looked in years.

          And, again, how very odd. I fully understand your love for Solaris. I was the proud owner of a Sun shop, including workstations, for quite some time. Heck, they've probably got some Sun blade servers sitting in the server room to this day. (I sold and retired about eight years ago

  • Now we just need a final release of Grand Theft Gentoo and it will be the year of the Linux gaming desktop.
  • The amount of people here complaining about a free game is astonishing. Somebody took some time and put forth the effort to produce something. It's nothing amazing, sure, but it's decent fun and brings back memories of the age of classic sidescrolling platformers. It's Linux-themed Super Mario 3. And yet, some people still find reason to complain. Well good thing it's open source, so you assholes can fix it to your liking.

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