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Open Source Linux

Inside Oregon State University's Open Source Lab 55

In his main page debut, ramereth writes with a look at the infrastructure of OSUOSL from Linux.com. From the article: "Many people use Linux in many ways, often totally unaware that they're depending on Linux. Likewise, those of us in the open source community depend heavily on Oregon State University's Open Source Labs (OSUOSL), but may not even realize just how much. Thanks to one of the final talks at LinuxCon by Lance Albertson, it's much clearer now just how important OSUOSL is."
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Inside Oregon State University's Open Source Lab

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  • It may well be a very important lab, but this piece reads a bit like fluff. The fact that one of the lab's members gave a talk saying it's important isn't the world's most neutral assessment of its importance; that is pretty much what people do when representing their labs at conferences.

    • The fact that one of the lab's members gave a talk saying it's important isn't the world's most neutral assessment of its importance

      Yeah, you need a 2000 year old book to add weight to those sorts of tactics..... ;)

  • Quack like the open source ducks you are, Oregon! ;->~

    Seriously, though, the best part of Open Source is they go away with treatment, and an internal solution of Bheer.

  • If I understand that article right, the lab provides hosting to medium-large OSS projects. Is that right? The summary makes it sound like the OSUOSL contributed some often-used libraries or tools, but it just sounds like they leveraged their University bandwidth to feed a server farm. I don't consider that so very impressive.

  • You can learn how to do what they do, in your basement, it'll just be somewhat smaller and slower, by at worst only by about two orders of magnitude. In fact my basement is considerably more technologically advanced than their datacenter. In fact, a recent string of emails on the NANOG mailing list about basement labs indicates my basement is relatively crude and simplistic.

    Compare and contrast w/ my house

    2770 square foot data center with 76 racks

    About the same floor size, although they're about seventy racks ahead of me. I had three at one poin

    • I am not a full-timer, and I am not speaking on behalf of OSL.

      The "legal reasons" alluded to are mostly problems with other signers on the contract for our upstream bandwidth provider. *coughDuckscough* At our bandwidth scale, tunneling is not feasible.

      We don't run Puppet at the moment, we run CFEngine. Everybody's receiving Puppet training and there's a slow-yet-steady migration to Puppet, but these things take time. There are quite a few people depending on us to not fuck up, so we don't change our stacks

      • The "legal reasons" alluded to are mostly problems with other signers on the contract for our upstream bandwidth provider. *coughDuckscough* At our bandwidth scale, tunneling is not feasible.

        Indeed, tunneling IPv6 at our scale would be quite silly.

        We don't run Puppet at the moment, we run CFEngine. Everybody's receiving Puppet training and there's a slow-yet-steady migration to Puppet, but these things take time. There are quite a few people depending on us to not fuck up, so we don't change our stacks without deliberation and testing.

        We've been using CFengine since nearly the day we started so we have a collection of CFengine recipes that go back 5-6 years. Its going to take a while to get everything in a state considering there's only one full-timer (me) and 4-6 undergraduate students. Granted we're working on just getting a bootstrap set of modules done first (which is almost completed). Additionally we're writing our modules so that they are reusable (which takes more time) for

  • Your DVD player, your Flat Panel TV, your BluRay player, your Mp3 player stereo, your router, even some kids toys run Linux.

    It's everywhere because Windows cant be and has a gigantic cost compared to using linux in the product.

  • Back in the 70's, I rode down with some students from PSU to a lecture.
    As we pulled into the campus, The wise-acre grad student driver noticed the sheep barn.
    He stated, And to your right, is the student recreation center.
    Good Times.

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