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Ubuntu Operating Systems Software Upgrades Linux

Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released 179

Posted by timothy
from the what-in-tahr-nation dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this announcement: "Ubuntu Linux version 14.04 LTS (code named "Trusty Tahr") has been released and available for download. This updated version includes the Linux kernel v3.13.0-24.46, Python 3.4, Xen 4.4, Libreoffice 4.2.3, MySQL 5.6/MariaDB 5.5, Apache 2.4, PHP 5.5, improvements to AppArmor allow more fine-grained control over application, and more. The latest release of Ubuntu Server is heavily focused on supporting cloud and scale-out computing platforms such as OpenStack, Docker, and more. As part of the wider Ubuntu 14.04 release efforts the Ubuntu Touch team is proud to make the latest and greatest touch experience available to our enthusiast users and developers. You can install Ubuntu on Nexus 4 Phone (mako), Nexus 7 (2013) Tablet (flo), and Nexus 10 Tablet (manta) by following these instructions. On a hardware front, ARM multiplatform support has been added, enabling you to build a single ARM kernel image that can boot across multiple hardware platforms. Additionally, the ARM64 and Power architectures are now fully supported. See detailed release notes for more information. A quick upgrade to a newer version of Ubuntu is possible over the network."
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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

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  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:10PM (#46781165) Journal

    Until all the apps are full screen only with no way to leave unless I get thrown back into a cell phone I wont be switching. I hope the apps only have 3 or 4 functions that are all hidden by default.

    That would be sooo cool. I am sure if I go to a starbucks with such a gui I can get so many chicks owwing and ahhing and using my hip touch screen. Sharkwire looks so cute ... giggles.

  • The only reason I care about Ubuntu updates is that they are followed by Mint updates. I really don't see why anyone would still want to use Ubuntu when there is an equally good (if not better) Debian/Ubuntu-based distro, especially given Shuttleworth's complete and utter contempt for the open source community.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:19PM (#46781269)

      given Shuttleworth's complete and utter contempt for the open source community.

      Where are you getting that from? Shuttleworth has done nothing but help the open source community in every way imaginable.

      • Maybe not a cell phone interface

      • Shuttleworth has done nothing but help the open source community in every way imaginable.

        You mean like commercialising his distro, splitting the community by taking his own direction away from Wayland, and ditto by taking his own direction with the GUI? Or did you intend irony?

        • by unrtst (777550) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @04:31PM (#46782543)

          I'm not a fan of Mir, nor a big fan of Unity, but I've been around long enough to see those sort of changes happen in every distro.

          My personal favorite window manger was sawmill/sawfish, which was the default with gnome at one point in time. When it was replaced, the replacement didn't do half of the features I regularly used, so I kept using it. Then it became much more difficult to get working, so I dropped gnome and used some dumb little apps to get a desktop switcher and clock and such, and went pretty bare-bones. Then compiz got pretty stable, so I gave up and used that. wash/rinse/repeat for a ton of other things in life.

          People turned against KDE for a long while too due to licensing issues. AFAICT, that has continued to hurt their image, even though all those issues have been resolved. IMO, that did push KDE/QT to change, and also pushed gnome to improve. Someone has to push the ball forward. Mir may never actually take off. If Wayland gets there first (and yes, there still is plenty to be done), Ubuntu could easily swap it into place. Similar with Unity... it does do a better job with touch than many of the other options. It, like almost everything else there is, won't last forever. It's not hurting things as long as there are other options (you can even just grab a xubuntu or kubuntu spin if you want).

          • by tuck182 (43130)

            I still miss sawfish. So customizable, and the undo feature on window move/resize was awesome.

            • I still miss sawfish. So customizable, and the undo feature on window move/resize was awesome.

              Yeah, but -- lisp! :( (Personally I was rather fond of IceWM back in the day, and contributed a bit of code to it. Customisability wasn't it's strong suit, but it was so damn fast on the crappy hardware I had fifteen years ago ...)

              FWIW, Ubuntu still has both sawfish and icewm available as packages, not that'll stop the clowns here complaining that Unity took away all their desktop choices ...

        • by squiggleslash (241428) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @05:51PM (#46783191) Homepage Journal

          I think the point is neither of these are attacks on the open source community. They're arguably attacks - albeit mere criticisms of - on "GNOME/Linux", but that's not the same thing.

          A company contributing bodies and work to a community is helping it, not harming it. It's up to us to decide if we want Mir and Unity. We're not harmed by their existence. And FWIW, anyone arguing that Mir is terrible because it undermines Wayland isn't thinking this through, both because there's a much greater case for saying Wayland is damaging to the future of GNU/Linux, and because Mir has changed the politics whereby Wayland was once an obscure thing nobody was taking any notice of, but Mir basically turned the entire argument from "Should we replace X11 with Wayland?" (Hell no) to "OK, should we use Mir or Wayland [abandonment of X11 is implied to be a settled issue.]"

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Shuttleworth's complete and utter contempt for the open source community.

      I'll concede that some initial releases were done way before they were polished, but half the griping isn't even about flawed features.

      In light of some of the changes that have caused some huge controversies (having the window buttons on the right vs left is straight out of Gulliver's), maybe you mean "ignoring the very vocal minority who reject innovation, either from a need to feel elite or fear of change".

      • by RDW (41497)

        In light of some of the changes that have caused some huge controversies (having the window buttons on the right vs left is straight out of Gulliver's), maybe you mean "ignoring the very vocal minority who reject innovation, either from a need to feel elite or fear of change".

        Moving the window buttons to the left is 'innovation'?

    • by butalearner (1235200) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @03:04PM (#46781729)

      The only reason I care about Ubuntu updates is that they are followed by Mint updates. I really don't see why anyone would still want to use Ubuntu when there is an equally good (if not better) Debian/Ubuntu-based distro, especially given Shuttleworth's complete and utter contempt for the open source community.

      Probably because ideology isn't really important to most people, who just want stuff that works. They don't care if they're running X or Wayland/Weston or Mir. And Shuttleworth definitely does not have contempt for the open source community in general...just the developers who don't follow his lead. Which definitely isn't cool, of course, but those developers don't represent everybody.

      After my old laptop with a highly-customized Arch Linux setup died, I went back to Ubuntu (which I've used since Warty Warthog!) because I didn't feel like spending the time to mess with stuff anymore. My personal laptop is currently sitting on 12.04 LTS. I might upgrade once 14.04.1 is released in August, depending on how reviews are. It looks like they didn't choose as many cutting-edge packages, so it may not be as big of a problem as the first releases of previous LTS editions were (remember the time they shipped an LTS release with a beta version of Firefox?).

      I'm using Mint 16 Cinnamon at work, so I could be convinced to switch, but my wife and kids are used to Unity by now. I have a terminal shortcut pinned near the top of the sidebar, so I get around easily enough.

    • by unixisc (2429386)
      Does Mint now follow Ubuntu releases at all? Or just stick to Debian? B'cos under the hood, it's Debian, and since Unity has been the hood ornament of Ubuntu for some time now (not counting Xubuntu/Lubuntu), which Mint doesn't use, why would Mint bother following Ubuntu at all? It may have started off as an Ubuntu derivative, but is it so any longer?
    • machineghost wrote :-

      I really don't see why anyone would still want to use Ubuntu when there is [Mint] an equally good (if not better) Debian/Ubuntu-based distro

      I don't see why anyone would want to use a distro based on Ubuntu [which is based on Debian] where there are equally good or better distros based on Debian directly.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Wow. Get over yourself, dude.

    • JEOS (Just Enough Operating System) used to be a sub-version of Ubuntu, with a minimal server edition; anything else you wanted was an apt-get install away. But there hasn't been a real JEOS version since about 8.04 or so, and with virtual machines these days I have a need for a lot of small-disk-footprint VMs. Is there something that's relatively similar, with basic networking and maybe a LAMP stack?

      It would be nice to have a basic X windows environment, but I don't need big piles of Gnome or KDE, and I

      • by benmhall (9092)

        The Server Edition is pretty minimal. If you're looking for X anyway, I'd just start with Server and add what you need. Yes, it's bigger than JEOS, but it also has all of your bases covered. Removing packages is trivial anyway.

        I typically start with Server, if it's a physical machine, and lubuntu-desktop. Sure, I waste a few hundred MB, but it saves me time and gives any other admin, even on ewith limited Linux experience, a pretty recognizable and usable environment without the bulk of things like an offic

    • by nut (19435) on Friday April 18, 2014 @07:50AM (#46786473) Homepage

      ... especially given Shuttleworth's complete and utter contempt for the open source community.

      He's giving it away for free. You don't have to use it.

  • Single ARM kernel? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Will the stoooopid people quit working on this. It's a dumb idea.

    Now instead of board-specific files and SoC-specific (CPU-specific) files, we have a multitude of device-tree files. The whole idea of single binary kernel for ARM is as absurd as having a single binary kernel for x86 and x86-64. Why would anybody want to be saddled with the chore of parsing device-tree info in the kernel on systems which are, arguably, mostly embedded systems where the hardware for a board is very well defined and add-on hard

    • by unixisc (2429386)
      Why so? It makes sense to concentrate Ubuntu on a platform where Windows doesn't exist (unless MS directly works on it). Any x64 based platform will have Windows running, but only a few custom ARM builds will. So what Ubuntu has done here makes good sense. They can stage it on the Raspberry Pi or Beagleboards & be off to the races.
    • by Terry Pearson (935552) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @05:44PM (#46783105) Homepage Journal
      As someone who works on Linux on ARM projects, I would have to disagree. There are good reasons to bring devices into the tree.

      It really does make sense to have a single ARM kernel source with a device tree. This is not a single binary for all, but a single source tree. When you compile, it is not like you are getting all the bloat of a hundred different board packages. You use a different make script that pulls in the appropriate files. What it does give us is great templates to use when porting to similar sources.

      If you ever take a look at board manufacturers' kernel source, each distribution is often very different from another. It takes a while to reconcile it with mainline kernel source. And it is even more of a pain to upgrade to a new kernel when a board maker had some whacky code placed in there. By at least placing it in the device tree, it gives them the incentive to use a template of code that already exists. Then hopefully some of us have an easier time porting when we want to upgrade Kernels and such.

      I know it does not seem like it makes a lot of sense to some, but there really are good reasons for the change.

      P.S. The unified Kernel is a Linux issue as a whole, not just an Ubuntu thing.

    • Oh FFS... nothing is stopping YOU from compiling your OWN platform specific kernel for your particular board... this uber ARM kernel however makes things far simpler for everyday folk to just download an ARM live disk and install it onto a laptop that has an ARM processor without having to jump through a multitude of hoops to cross-compile an image for his specific processor... there are a lot of ARM based laptops and tablets that do have the resources to handle this and it would make it far easier to get L
  • It's not bad (Score:5, Informative)

    by willoughby (1367773) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:50PM (#46781595)

    I've been using it since the beta & it runs very well. Netflix & Steam install very quick & easy & run well.

    This is my longest experience with Unity & I've found it's not too bad, either. Experience with OSX helps get used to the non-menu way of selecting a program but in use it's really like a menu, anyway. (click the Ubuntu logo thingy [or super-a] -> apps -> internet -> firefox) And at least when you bring up the program selection it doesn't cover the entire desktop.

    I also like that they are trying to conserve vertical space by putting the launcher on the left edge instead of the bottom and eliminating the menu bar on windows. Moving the menus sounded odd 'till I learn why and , again, experience with Macs helps get used to it.

    But Unity is slow compared to other desktops, and very difficult to customize.

    I may still go back to XFCE just to get the 'right-click on the desktop for a menu' back. (or I could just install Windowmaker... hmmm)

    But overall Ubuntu 14.04 has been very stable & runs quite nicely.

    • I forgot to put in there that I'm running an Nvidia GeForce GT630 & using the proprietary driver.

    • I've been running the beta as well. I can definitely recommend giving the ubuntu-branded lxde a go. It looks really really good, and is super fast. I was never really a fan of LXDE before this.
    • by Mashdar (876825)
      I don't know if they ever pulled their heads out of their collive ass, but when they first introduced that menu bar, you have no choice but to have it on the left, and if you had two monitors, it was on the left of your right-hand monitor. (I tried changing primaries, ports, etc, but it was literally hard-coded to be on the right-hand monitor.)
      This meant that the bar was in the middle of my field of vision at all times. Pretty damn annoying. And not letting me move it was a giant middle finger in my face.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    The times I have used Linux I have made the choice to directly avoid Ubuntu at all costs. I used to think just the opposite before Unity interface and the fact Ubuntu has pretty much gone their own direction with open source. Which of course is fine, but it has not the path I chose.
    When you start making changes to the OS to better mold with other platforms like mobile and tablets. You start to make compromises. The user starts to be a guinea pig. If you are just a PC user there are plenty of better desktop

    • So if you're still around, and not just drive-by trolling, what do you recommend other than Ubuntu or Mint? (I'm not counting Mint because there's already a thread about that.)

  • by benmhall (9092) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @03:12PM (#46781807) Homepage Journal

    I'll be upgrading all of our Ubuntu 12.04 machines (and many 10.04 servers) over the coming months, and I'm looking forward to the changes.

    Canonical and Ubuntu have done more for desktop Linux than any other company I can think of. I look forward to their regular releases, strong committment to patches, and easy, reliable upgrades. As a sysadmin, they've made my life much easier on both server and desktop. Predictable releases and solid relationships with Dell, IBM, and HP mean that I can buy almost server or laptop and know that it will "just work."

    Thank you to the developers, backers, hackers, and community.

    • So is there any way to cache Ubuntu upgrades, which would let my large collection of virtual and physical lab machines all fetch them from the LAN instead of the each one having to drag them across its WAN? Might as well fetch the official copy just once, and have everything else update at gigabit speeds.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The following comments will be related to at least one of these :
    a) how Canonical "sucks";
    b) how Mint/Debian/Windows is/are better than Ubuntu;
    c) how much you hate spyware and Amazon even tho it's opt-in;
    d) how much you hate Unity.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You forgot:

      e) how Mir / Wayland are totally and completely useless because they're not natively network transparent;
      f) how Mark Shuttleworth is the fucking anti-christ

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      c) how much you hate spyware and Amazon even tho it's opt-in;

      If it's enabled by default and I have to turn it off, that's opt-out, not opt-in.

  • by OneAhead (1495535) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @03:34PM (#46782047)
    As of writing, the "release notes" link in the summary points to the upgrade instructions on nixCraft, whereas it presumably should have pointed to this:
    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Trusty... [ubuntu.com]
    Please fix!
  • ...does it run Linux? Can you build a Beowulf cluster using this?

    Yes of course it does.

    The whole Linux/Windows divide reminds me of the Reformation, with the Protestant denominations in endless schism on the pretext of maintaining doctrinal purity.

  • After over three decades, we're still anticipating the release of Funky Gibbon [youtube.com].

    C'mon everybody it's gibbon time!

  • I don't want to hit the main ubuntu server for updates. Maybe the push sync to the au server is broken. Hopefully somebody will look at it before tuesday.

  • This new release is timely. I assume that those interested in increasing the user base of ubuntu did not miss the significance of this news about XP. The number I've heard tossed around is 30% of existing PC's run XP and it is now being recommended that they stop using it. I was disturbed to hear a major network news channel recommend that XP users either buy win8 or buy a new computer. Anyone interested in promoting linux distros should not pass up this opportunity.

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