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Ubuntu Operating Systems Software Upgrades Linux

Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released 179

Posted by timothy
from the what-in-tahr-nation dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this announcement: "Ubuntu Linux version 14.04 LTS (code named "Trusty Tahr") has been released and available for download. This updated version includes the Linux kernel v3.13.0-24.46, Python 3.4, Xen 4.4, Libreoffice 4.2.3, MySQL 5.6/MariaDB 5.5, Apache 2.4, PHP 5.5, improvements to AppArmor allow more fine-grained control over application, and more. The latest release of Ubuntu Server is heavily focused on supporting cloud and scale-out computing platforms such as OpenStack, Docker, and more. As part of the wider Ubuntu 14.04 release efforts the Ubuntu Touch team is proud to make the latest and greatest touch experience available to our enthusiast users and developers. You can install Ubuntu on Nexus 4 Phone (mako), Nexus 7 (2013) Tablet (flo), and Nexus 10 Tablet (manta) by following these instructions. On a hardware front, ARM multiplatform support has been added, enabling you to build a single ARM kernel image that can boot across multiple hardware platforms. Additionally, the ARM64 and Power architectures are now fully supported. See detailed release notes for more information. A quick upgrade to a newer version of Ubuntu is possible over the network."
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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

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  • Re:Spyware status (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:23PM (#46781325)

    This would be the Amazon search lens, which was enabled by default. When you used the Search functionality in Unity desktop, it would search both local files/content and Amazon's catalog of products online.

    Not exactly spyware per se, but certainly irritating - especially if you're concerned about your privacy. I don't expect the search function on my local Linux computer to run off and search Amazon for interesting products...

    and no, it hasn't been disabled by default. You can turn it off via the Settings panel though.

  • Re:Quick question (Score:5, Informative)

    by jones_supa (887896) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:38PM (#46781497)
    It does not suck that bad anymore. For anyone still having a grudge against Unity, I recommend trying it again at this point.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:46PM (#46781569)

    I can change the network configs with out rebooting??? Where did you get that from? (I can change ip address, dns settings, default gateway, etc no reboot needed. /etc/network/interfaces)

  • by machineghost (622031) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:48PM (#46781583)

    Mint listens to their constintuents, and builds their distro around their concerns. Ubuntu does whatever the heck they want and says "take it or leave it".

    See Mint's choice of MATE (Gnome2) or Gnome3 vs. Ubuntu's "We're making this new Unity thing that no one wants and we'll force it on our users before its ready".

  • It's not bad (Score:5, Informative)

    by willoughby (1367773) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:50PM (#46781595)

    I've been using it since the beta & it runs very well. Netflix & Steam install very quick & easy & run well.

    This is my longest experience with Unity & I've found it's not too bad, either. Experience with OSX helps get used to the non-menu way of selecting a program but in use it's really like a menu, anyway. (click the Ubuntu logo thingy [or super-a] -> apps -> internet -> firefox) And at least when you bring up the program selection it doesn't cover the entire desktop.

    I also like that they are trying to conserve vertical space by putting the launcher on the left edge instead of the bottom and eliminating the menu bar on windows. Moving the menus sounded odd 'till I learn why and , again, experience with Macs helps get used to it.

    But Unity is slow compared to other desktops, and very difficult to customize.

    I may still go back to XFCE just to get the 'right-click on the desktop for a menu' back. (or I could just install Windowmaker... hmmm)

    But overall Ubuntu 14.04 has been very stable & runs quite nicely.

  • by Pascoea (968200) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @02:50PM (#46781597)
    I guess this is what I get for browsing at -1... While I do agree with you on your point about rebooting to apply networking config (I'm assuming it's a true statement) I think if that's the best argument you can come up with for why Ubuntu/Shuttleworth suck you are pretty far off-base with your evaluation. I like it because it gives me access to a linux server environment that is literally child's play to install, and it gives the non-techy person a decent alternative to Windows. It is the first distro that I have seen that you don't need a deep understanding of a computer to install it. (My 12 year old was able to install it by himself) Considering where the Linux world was 10 years ago, I'd say that's a pretty damn good contribution to the open source community. Are there better distros out there? Yeah, there probably are. Has one company done as much as Canonical to push Linux to the masses? Probably not.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @03:12PM (#46781813)

    Mint listens to their constintuents, and builds their distro around their concerns. Ubuntu does whatever the heck they want and says "take it or leave it".

    See Mint's choice of MATE (Gnome2) or Gnome3 vs. Ubuntu's "We're making this new Unity thing that no one wants and we'll force it on our users before its ready".

    Which is why some of us (perhaps a good number) moved to Xubuntu.

  • by OneAhead (1495535) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @03:34PM (#46782047)
    As of writing, the "release notes" link in the summary points to the upgrade instructions on nixCraft, whereas it presumably should have pointed to this:
    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Trusty... [ubuntu.com]
    Please fix!
  • by SeaFox (739806) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @04:22PM (#46782481)

    Does Mint now follow Ubuntu releases at all? Or just stick to Debian? B'cos under the hood, it's Debian...

    Bad info is bad.
    Mint has two editions. The normal release is based on Ubuntu, but there is a second more rolling-release edition based on Debian Unstable called LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition). It is available in both Mate and Cinnamon interfaces.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @05:10PM (#46782859)

    c) how much you hate spyware and Amazon even tho it's opt-in;

    If it's enabled by default and I have to turn it off, that's opt-out, not opt-in.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 17, 2014 @05:34PM (#46783021)

    Wow. Get over yourself, dude.

  • by squiggleslash (241428) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @05:51PM (#46783191) Homepage Journal

    I think the point is neither of these are attacks on the open source community. They're arguably attacks - albeit mere criticisms of - on "GNOME/Linux", but that's not the same thing.

    A company contributing bodies and work to a community is helping it, not harming it. It's up to us to decide if we want Mir and Unity. We're not harmed by their existence. And FWIW, anyone arguing that Mir is terrible because it undermines Wayland isn't thinking this through, both because there's a much greater case for saying Wayland is damaging to the future of GNU/Linux, and because Mir has changed the politics whereby Wayland was once an obscure thing nobody was taking any notice of, but Mir basically turned the entire argument from "Should we replace X11 with Wayland?" (Hell no) to "OK, should we use Mir or Wayland [abandonment of X11 is implied to be a settled issue.]"

  • by Blaskowicz (634489) on Thursday April 17, 2014 @06:17PM (#46783433)

    Further info : Mint 17, 18, 19, 20 (assuming they keep a 6-month release rate) will be based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, the changes supposedly will be linux and Xorg updates for compatibility/performance of newer hardware, and newer versions of Mate and Cinnamon.

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