Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Linux

Linus Torvalds Celebrates 20 Years of Windows 3.11 With Linux 3.11-rc5 Launch 113

Posted by samzenpus
from the check-it-out dept.
hypnosec writes "Linus Torvalds released Linux 3.11-rc5 yesterday wishing that it would have been a lovely coincidence if he were able to release final Linux 3.11 as on the exact same day 20 years ago Microsoft released Windows 3.11. 'Sadly, the numerology doesn't quite work out, and while releasing the final 3.11 today would be a lovely coincidence (Windows 3.11 was released twenty years ago today), it is not to be,' notes Torvalds in the release announcement."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Linus Torvalds Celebrates 20 Years of Windows 3.11 With Linux 3.11-rc5 Launch

Comments Filter:
  • Re:I feel old (Score:5, Informative)

    by Hatta (162192) on Monday August 12, 2013 @02:54PM (#44544561) Journal

    For those feeling nostalgic, Windows 3.11 works in Doxbox quite nicely. Grab the microsoft entertainment pack and play some skifree.

  • Re:mad libs (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 12, 2013 @03:05PM (#44544711)
    one dimensional, bread obsessed electrical appliance.
  • by frovingslosh (582462) on Monday August 12, 2013 @03:09PM (#44544759)

    "... while releasing the final 3.11 today would be a lovely coincidence ..."

    Apparently Linus does not know the meaning of the word coincidence. If he had hit the target date deliberately and with advanced planning, it would not have been legitimately called a coincidence.

  • by Entropius (188861) on Monday August 12, 2013 @06:04PM (#44546675)

    Lattice gauge theory simulations, so there's actually an excuse for the bloat. It runs on a 24*24*24*48 grid, so you need buckets of memory to store everything; this isn't as bad as the more ambitious groups, who are up to 192^3*384 (I think). It's pretty obscene how much computing power goes into this field -- the computation I've just started will take two months on 100 GPU's (which is about 10^18-10^19 floating point operations), and it's a small one compared to some of the things people do. It's also very heavily memory bandwidth bound, so I don't think we could do ASIC's like the Bitcoin folks do.

How much net work could a network work, if a network could net work?

Working...