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Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' Release Candidate Is Out 134

Posted by Soulskill
from the onward-and-upward dept.
New submitter Anand Radhakrishnan writes "The release candidate for the much-anticipated Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' is available for user testing. Its many new features include Cinnamon Control center, an improved login manager with HTML 5 support, a driver manager, and a lot of under-the-hood improvements. 'A new tool called MintSources, aka "Software Sources," was developed from scratch with derivative distributions in mind (primarily Linux Mint, but also LMDE, Netrunner and Snow Linux). It replaces software-properties-gtk and is perfectly adapted to managing software sources in Linux Mint. From the main screen you can easily enable or disable optional components and gain access to backports, unstable packages and source code.' This release with Cinnamon looks really tempting."
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Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' Release Candidate Is Out

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  • Obligatory comment (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:11PM (#43758063)
    When Ubuntu introduced Unity I switched to Linux Mint and haven't looked back.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:22PM (#43758157)

      Right on. No need for a touch-screen OS on the desktop.

    • by Adult film producer (866485) <van@i2pmail.org> on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:29PM (#43758209)
      Same deal here. I had no plans on switching and didn't want to but I really had no choice but to leave ubuntu :~(
      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:31PM (#43758655)

        A new tool called MintSources, aka "Software Sources," was developed from scratch

        Do they include a version of Synaptic that isn't modified to remove the Update functionality?

        Seriously, why do they force you to use their own icon-tray updating tool by REMOVING this functionality from Synaptic? It's a retarded decision from an otherwise truly excellent distribution. Yeah, I know it's just a nuisance and not a big deal, but it makes no sense at all. If I wanted this kind of "do it our way" experience I would buy Apple.

    • by tuppe666 (904118) on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:31PM (#43758233)

      When Ubuntu introduced Unity I switched to Linux Mint and haven't looked back.

      I'm actually running Ubuntu with Cinnamon installed (I would be running Mint if it wasn't for the delay between their respective releases) . Its kind of sad that Mints main benefit (since Debian rolling releases stopped) is that its everything you like about Ubuntu....great support; almost cutting edge, with backported fixes for stability(although not as Stable as Debian...but that is not cutting edge) with some sensible defaults...because it is basically ubuntu.

      Hell I quite like the fact that canonical tried to make Ubuntu pretty (and fast).But the move towards recreating elements rather than *selecting* popular ones (Mer seriously) like say Cinnamon, is going to hurt them. I hope they have success with the phone...where I think Unity (and all the other garbage...like a new package manager) might be a better fit.

      So yeah not obligatory...I'm using it with Cinnamon now, and accept Mints roots when I use that (and Debians)

      Not is someone could go about producing a rolling (cutiing edge) Debian release (with an enormous rescue me button) then I would look forward to it.

      • by G3ckoG33k (647276) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @06:07AM (#43760861)

        I'm actually running Debian with Sid installed (I would be running Ubuntu if it wasn't for the delay between their respective releases) . Its kind of sad that Ubuntus main benefit (since Debian experimental releases are too wild) is that its everything you like about Debian Sid....great support; almost cutting edge, with backported fixes for stability(although not as Stable as Debian stable... but that is not cutting edge) with some sensible defaults...because it is basically Debian Sid.

        Hell I quite like the fact that users tried to make Debian pretty (and fast).But the move towards recreating elements rather than *selecting* popular ones (Mer seriously) like say KDE 4.8 Oxygen, is going to hurt them. I hope they have success with Qt... where I think KDE (and all the other garbage...like a new package manager) might be a better fit.

        So yeah not obligatory...I'm using it with KDE now, and accept other roots when I use that (and GNU/Linux)

        Not is someone could go about producing a rolling (cutiing edge) GNU/Linux release (with an enormous rescue me button) then I would look forward to it.

      • by Scottie-Z (30248) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @03:43PM (#43764077)
        Mint Debian Edition?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:45PM (#43758325)

      I got a desktop on Ubuntu 13.4 and a laptop on Mint.

      So far the laptop is my favorite machine. The only reason that I still have the desktop is because I do some serous number crunching on it - and I got a lot invested in the hardware. When this shit goes - laptop Baby! I'm tired of the clutter and the energy consumption for the desktops. I don't need the horsepower or the shitty keyboards, I just just do data analysis and other PHB shit. When tablets mature, I'm sure to go there.

      Yeah, I'm a PHB - throw your tomatoes. I'll laugh all the way to the bank while eating a salad.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:36PM (#43758695)

      And have they actually explained publically what the "Mint Search Enhancer" extension for Firefox does? You know, the one that you can't remove without also removing your desktop's meta-package in Mint, ensuring that it's reinstalled on every UI upgrade?

      • by Atomic Fro (150394) on Friday May 17, 2013 @10:35PM (#43759695)

        They have. They use it do get revenue from your searches.

      • by Man Eating Duck (534479) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @06:33PM (#43769903)

        And have they actually explained publically what the "Mint Search Enhancer" extension for Firefox does? You know, the one that you can't remove without also removing your desktop's meta-package in Mint, ensuring that it's reinstalled on every UI upgrade?

        This [linuxmint.com] is a bit old, but they have explained it several times. I actually wouldn't mind it if it didn't stupidly break functionality like the Google calculator and cached pages. Someone benefits from your searches anyway. I don't remember exactly how I did it, but I got rid of it, and it didn't come back.

        Sorry Mint, but if you destroy basic functionality in the process of earning money off of my browsing, your hacks go away just as other annoyances such as online ads. I kept the default home page, though, I have several default tabs in any case.

    • by wordsnyc (956034) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @03:30AM (#43760525) Homepage

      Using Mint 13 LTS with Mate -- I had been using Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, but they stopped updating it in any useful way. Mate is like an improved version of Gnome 2: not beautiful, but no drama, and it lets me easily put things in the panels. Most of what I do is writing, so I figure I'm good until 2015 or whatever.

    • by Clarious (1177725) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @07:02AM (#43760965)

      I still use Unity, it is strangely good after you used it for a while, despite some minor bugs here and there. Unity actually included many useful features from other desktops, such as:
      - Menu on top, titlebar on top (when full screen): Saving precious vertical space, esp. useful with my 1366x768 laptop screen. And to be honest, I only care about the menu of the program I am focused on anyway, so one menu at a time isn't a big problem.
      - Taskbar on the left, with grouping: same as above, with 16:9 screen I can spare some horizontal space for it. Also you can quickly switch windows with Super + F[1234], something taken from Microsoft Windows 7, it is more useful and faster than Alt-tabbing because you don't have to wait for the list of windows to appear, you always know which keys to press.
      - Windows grouping, subgroup switching with Alt+grave (`). Taken from GNOME Shell, help unclutter my windows list, and switching is faster too. I loved this feature of GNOME Shell, too bad it removed the windows list (taskbar) so I can't have an overall view of which windows are on the screen. Same goes for notification area, GNOME Shell removed that part and go for a touch-oriented notification system (tap bottom right for the notification list), which is extremely useless since the notification area (or systray, as in windows) is supposed to always stay on screen so you can have a quick glance.
      - Topbar widget/notification is more refined than GNOME Shell, with the later on you have to write an extension in javascript with little to no documentation. With unity you can write one in python, easy.
      - Last but not least, Compiz is still better than metacity/GNOME Shell in CPU/RAM usage. With GNOME Shell you are practically running an webkit browser with all the javascript jazz and stuff. So while Compiz/Unity only eats ~90 MB RAM, metacity/GNOME Shell eats about 250 MB. Sure, RAM is fairly cheap these days but that doesn't mean your desktop has to use as much RAM as the sum of the rest of your programs.

      Linux Mint with MATE or Cinnamon is okay too. But MATE is just GNOME 2 renamed, it works, but no better than GNOME 2, and with a bunch of leftovers tech such as libbonobo. Cinnamon is, well, nothing special, nothing attractive for me to use, that is it. And I have heard that Cinnamon devs have many problem following upstream too.

      • by QuantumRiff (120817) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @08:59AM (#43761289)

        I liked it as well, until the last update. Little things started killing my productivity. Like when I would get a new chat message in Pidgin. I would go up to the indicator area, click on the envelope, then see a list of several chats I had, many that were quite old, I would click on hte newest one, and it woudl blink, and the indicator would go off.. But that was it. It wouldn't actually load up the pidgin window to the chat. If I went directly to pidgin, it wouldn't turn off the indicator envelope. Thunderbird had some similar bugs, which is even more disappointing than the Pidgin one, since thunderbird is the default mail client. There are actually quite a few other things, but they are all just little things that have added to to being a waste of time.

    • by KingBenny (1301797) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @10:32PM (#43770911) Homepage
      no one told me to look back because their experience with unity had improved over mint by now either so why change a winning formula im gonna need to check this asap i was wondering what the delly was
  • by oldhack (1037484) on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:17PM (#43758113)
    All hail to Debian. :-)
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:32PM (#43758243)

      I agree, switching from Ubuntu to Mint just seems like moving in the wrong direction. Debian might have some rough edges, but it's stable and long established. It would be really nice to see the Debian community grow as a result of this exodus from Ubuntu.

    • Re:ALL HAIL! (Score:4, Informative)

      by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Friday May 17, 2013 @11:10PM (#43759827)

      Re: All hail to Debian. :-)

      Huzzah! Yes, indeed, all Hail Debian, the basis of these all! It is sad that so much bounds forth from these springs yet so few are aware of the source of these precious waters!!! As I said earlier, to one who dared mock Debian's utility [slashdot.org]:


      Debian has stayed being what it has always been. It's just being used more as the foundation that supports the work of the facade builders and marketers that put a pretty face (or not-so-pretty Tammy Faye Baker clown-makeup face, if you want Gnome 3, imho) on top of all that and market it as if they made the whole thing.

      Again, I say to thee, all Hail Deb-Ian ! (also, have you ever seen the canadian cartoon "Being Ian" ? )

    • by Requiem18th (742389) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @07:53AM (#43761055)

      I'm undecided about switching to LMDE, aptosid, or just plain sid. On the one hand I like the idea of not ever having to reinstall the OS for upgrades, on the other hand I feel that eventually I'll have to because of an accumulation of botched installs.

      Meanwhile the fuckers at Valve decided that only Ubuntu deserves Steam. But then again TF2 runs like molass in linux with an AMD setup.

      • by akc (207721) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @12:45PM (#43762847) Homepage

        I have been running Debian for about 10 years, and the only time I've had to re-install it was when I bought completely new hardware. I never got so botched that I need to start again. Most of the time I have run as SID, although over the last 6 months or so I migrated slowly to testing which became stable - since I seem to have everything I need at a suitably high enough version.

        Because I run all my disks as raid 1, when I upgraded from 1 to 2 TB disks, I did that with the system in situ.

  • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:17PM (#43758121)

    I'm running Mint now, I think it is MInt 13 or maybe 12. I would have upgraded a long time ago except that in place upgrades are not supported. If I had known that, I would never have left ubuntu for Mint.

    Next time I "upgrade" I'm just going to go back to Ubuntu so I don't have to deal with that hassle anymore. In place upgrades always worked fine for me on Ubuntu since I would wait a month or two after release for all the other guinea pigs to work through any problems.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:25PM (#43758189)

    Upgrade to Ubuntu!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:27PM (#43758199)

    I had to reinstall Firefox because of all the crap Mint puts in it as part of the standard distro.

  • by CFBMoo1 (157453) on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:40PM (#43758299) Homepage
    I've had really good experiences with Mint Cinnamon on my laptop at work. They went the direction Ubuntu should have gone for the Desktop.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @06:58PM (#43758401)

    Using Mint (Maya LTS) with MATE and am happy as can be. Not bug-free, but just about as good as I've ever had it. Highly recommended. Got Slackware on the Desktop and Mint on the lap.

  • by loufoque (1400831) on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:12PM (#43758533)

    I've been running Ubuntu for a long time, with increased disappointment at each upgrade, not all of which are caused by Canonical.
    I had been mostly OK for a time with GNOME fallback, or whatever it is that they call running gnome-panel and metacity. But now I've also had to replace Nautilus by Nemo (Cinnamon's Nautilus fork) because the latest Nautilus introduces too many regressions.

    Is Linux Mint what I need? Or should I just consider moving to Debian?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:28PM (#43758629)

      Or Kubuntu. KDE is really lots better than what you're used to.

    • by Nite_Hawk (1304) on Friday May 17, 2013 @08:47PM (#43759183) Homepage

      I've got Mint on my wife's laptop and ubuntu with Cinnamon on mine. On my desktop I recently installed an SSD and did a new install. Had mint 15 been out I would have strongly considered it, but ultimately I decided that for now Ubuntu 13.04 + cinnamon is a pretty good combination. Not sure if that will continue to be the case, but for the moment I think it's about as good as it gets.

      Having said that, Mint 14 on my wife's laptop has been rock solid and I'm guessing she will continue to happily use it for some time to come.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:13PM (#43758543)

    I installed it this morning, just because.

    I could not connect to a hidden access point. Attempting to, closed the network manager. Re-installed 14 and thing are fine.

    Mint is the reson that I'm completely M$ free at my house now. Previously, I kept an XP machine going in my daughters' room for them to play with. They have no problems using Mint as a workstation. I like it. It is easy to manage and there seems to be many people in the Mint community willing to help if there are problems.

    I can't seem to get Wolfenstein Enemy Territory working on it though.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:23PM (#43758597)

    I was late to the party, but I was so disgusted with several of the recent decisions from Canonical (Unity, spyware, ads, removal of Synaptic, steering toward commercial apps when better free alternatives exist, and on and on) that had rendered it marginally useful on the very machines it had once redeemed from the Windows quagmire that I not only switched them all to Mint, but switched them to LMDE- Linux Mint Debian (Cinnamon).

    Yes, there are a couple of rough edges, but the general increase in speed and usability has been a relief like a thorn removed from my flesh. It is MUCH better. Whatever advantage the mainstream Linux Mint has over the Debian Edition, I'm more than willing to forgo them to be removed from dependency on Canonical entirely.

    A couple of years ago I felt completely differently. Ubuntu did great things for the desktop user and it pains me to have to reject their direction now... but human institutions tend to become evil the moment they think they are indispensable. The nature of open source and the hard work of the folks at Mint have rendered this change of Ubuntu's character ineffective and irrelevant, and I am very grateful for both.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @07:40PM (#43758735)

    I posted something but can't see it now because I couldn't read the damned Captcha. Thanks.

    I got so disgusted with recent decisions by Canonical (spyware, steering toward commercial apps, Unity, removal of Synaptic, and on and on) that I switched all my machines not just to Mint but to LMDE- Linux Mint Debian Edition (Cinnamon).

    I did it to deliberately remove myself from dependency on Canonical. Yes, there are a few rough edges yet, but it now works so much better than Ubuntu that the change was like having a thorn removed from my flesh. It's faster, it's more intuitive, it gets out of the way, and by and large it "just works".

    And YES, unlike "mainstream" Mint it does "upgrade in place" just like Debian. It's intended to run just like the "mainstream" (Ubuntu) Mint, it already comes impressively close, and I think it will get steadily closer with each release. It is already completely viable. I can't compare it to Mint 14, but compared to Ubuntu I am very pleased.

    Check it out. If you don't need Ubuntu, you don't need to be downstream of it either.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 17, 2013 @08:15PM (#43758983)

    So, Clem, a penguin and Mark walk into a bar.

    Mark: "I'll have something brilliantly bubbly and clamorously colorful that goes down elegantly easy and tastes amazingly amazonian. Clem will have the same, surely, and the penguin will promptly and precisely have a non-alcoholic beer or a diet rootbeer if you don't have one. And you, sir, should have a coffee, black and decaffeinated."

    Bartender: "Huh? Umm, ....Alright. Walk to the far left corner of the bar, stop, back up, and approach again while repeating your order clearly but not too loudly. A menu will be provided by market-research agents shortly. Your order does not yet qualify for super free shipping, so you may have to wait or buy more drinks." *shakes head, spits on floor*

    Clem: "I'll have a whiskey. ..Gentleman Jack, please."

    Bartender: Pours whiskey in large glass, sets it down and asks "Who the fuck is that arrogant asshole? And why is he smiling so much?"

    Clem: "What guy?"

    Bartender: "The guy you came in with, who ordered you one of those ....things, and told me I wanted coffee."

    Penguin: "What about me? I want a vodka, fuck rootbeer and non-alcoholic beer!"

    Bartender: "Is someone asking for vodka? Where's that voice coming from?"

    Mark: "Shut up you little ingrate!"

    Clem: Whispers to bartender "That's the penguin. He's standing here beside me, beneath the bar." Picks penguin up and sets on stool.

    Bartender: "Oh, hello there. Would you like that rootbeer now?"

    Penguin: "For fucks sake mate, I don't want a bloody rootbeer. I want a goddamn vodka!"

    Clem: "One vodka for the penguin. On me."

    Penguin: "Thanks, but I could've got my own."

    Mark: Squirming in corner, scowling and twitching. "I want kosher koolaid, now! Forget the other order. ...Where's my space pod? Can't a billionaire get a drink in this place!"

    Bartender: "This is a bit abnormal. Maybe I'll have a regular coffee."

    Clem: "Cool"

  • by Bonker (243350) on Friday May 17, 2013 @08:27PM (#43759057)

    Cinnamon is pretty nice. It nicely captures the features of the traditional app bar and combines the ability to use plugins and 'pin' apps. I LURVE me the ability to manage my networks and VPNs from the applet interface.

    It does have a few problems. First off, it's somewhat confusing to edit the Cinnamon menu. My ideal solution would be to create a nested folder structure filled with softlinks so I could simply manage it with a file manager. (Sorry, haters. MS just got it right there.) However, a more-full-featured menu editor would be almost as good.

    Secondly, it's pretty difficult to move the Cinnamon menu bar around. It can be done, but takes some config file editing rather than point-click-drag-drop like the proprietary OSs.

    To my understanding, Cinnamon is ultimately a highly customized Gnome configuration, so I suspect that what's holding Cinnamon back are shortcomings in Gnome or GTK. However, I'm not an expert.

    • by kernelpanicked (882802) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @01:56AM (#43760327)

      You know what I love?

      Being able to set custom keybindings.
      Workspaces...in a grid.
      Alt-Tab to any running app on any desktop.

      Ya know, all the things that Gnome 3 actually did right (no matter how much I've come to despise it), and the Mint team decided to break. For now I'll just keep on trucking along with XFCE, and if Clem and the gang ever decide to stop fucking with login manager settings and fix some of their outstanding bugs, maybe I'll give Cinnamon another look.

  • by tftp (111690) on Friday May 17, 2013 @08:30PM (#43759077) Homepage

    I have 14-kde; GNOME just doesn't work for me. Too simplistic, perhaps. I was always leaning toward KDE, and its C++/Qt base was far richer than the objects made by hand in C (GTK.) I'll get one to try again, though, just to be educated.

  • by Stormwatch (703920) <rodrigogirao@hLIONotmail.com minus cat> on Friday May 17, 2013 @08:53PM (#43759209) Homepage

    I installed it under VirtualBox, but when I run it, after I log in, the virtual machine closes by itself and it appears as "aborted" in the list.

  • by trout007 (975317) on Friday May 17, 2013 @09:14PM (#43759313)

    The microkernel is going to catch in any day now.

  • by manu0601 (2221348) on Friday May 17, 2013 @09:27PM (#43759379)
    HTML 5 support at the login manager seems an horrible idea, which will be exploited at some time to steal authentication credentials.
  • by dgharmon (2564621) on Friday May 17, 2013 @10:08PM (#43759547) Homepage
    I've been using lubuntu [lubuntu.net] for a long time, so haven't noticed ...
  • by jwinterm (2740003) on Friday May 17, 2013 @10:35PM (#43759697)
    "Linux Mint 15 is the most ambitious release since the start of the project. MATE 1.6 is greatly improved and Cinnamon 1.8 offers a ton of new features, including a screensaver and a unified control center." Really, linux mint, a screensaver, really?
    • by aled (228417) on Friday May 17, 2013 @10:58PM (#43759775)

      "Linux Mint 15 is the most ambitious release since the start of the project. MATE 1.6 is greatly improved and Cinnamon 1.8 offers a ton of new features, including a screensaver and a unified control center."

      Really, linux mint, a screensaver, really?

      Well, the last time I tried Ubuntu 3d screensavers wouldn't work properly, meaning the screen went black and I had to enter my password with no visual feedback to unlock. Also the screensavers weren't configurable and were generally an example of all that was wrong with ubuntu, linux and everything.

  • by Lazaro Alejo (2926605) on Saturday May 18, 2013 @11:37AM (#43762331)
    Cant log in

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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