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Debian Open Source Operating Systems Software Upgrades Linux

Debian 7.0 ('Wheezy') Release Planned For 1st Weekend in May 226

Posted by timothy
from the to-be-young-was-very-heaven dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this good news from the Debian developers who have been working hard to release the next version of the distro: "We now have a target date of the weekend of 4th/5th May for the release. We have checked with core teams, and this seems to be acceptable for everyone. This means we are able to begin the final preparations for a release of Debian 7.0 — 'Wheezy'. The intention is only to lift the date if something really critical pops up that is not possible to handle as an errata, or if we end up technically unable to release that weekend (e.g. a required machine crashes or d-i explodes in a giant ball of fire). Every other RC fix that does not make it in time will be r1 material. Please be sure to contact us about the RC fixes you would like included in the point release!" Of particular interest to casual users, from the list of changes in 7.0: "Debian wheezy comes with full-featured libav (formerly ffmpeg) libraries and frontends, including e.g. mplayer, mencoder, vlc and transcode. Additional codec support is provided e.g. through lame for MP3 audio encoding, xvidcore for MPEG-4 ASP video encoding, x264 for H.264/MPEG-4 AVC video encoding, vo-aacenc for AAC audio encoding and opencore-amr and vo-amrwbenc for Adaptive Multi-Rate Narrowband and Wideband encoding and decoding, respectively. For most use cases, installation of packages from third-party repositories should not be necessary anymore. The times of crippled multimedia support in Debian are finally over!"
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Debian 7.0 ('Wheezy') Release Planned For 1st Weekend in May

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  • Freeze (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    xfce 4.8! finally!

    • by kthreadd (1558445)

      The point of Debian is not to get the latest goodies quickly, but that what you get will work and continue to work well as long as it is supported. Unfortuneately it's not supported for very long time, but it's still very impressive given that it's essentially just a non-profit project.

      • Re:Freeze (Score:5, Interesting)

        by fnj (64210) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @04:43PM (#43486749)

        Being stuck with Xfce 4.8 is particularly galling since the default desktop for Wheezy is the unutterably awful GNOME 3. Xfce 4.10 will be OVER ONE YEAR OLD when Wheezy is released and it is absolutely crazy not to have 4.10 in Wheezy.

        I'll grant you that even Xfce 4.8 is vastly superior to GNOME 3, but it is very unfortunate not to have 4.10, which has some significant enhancements; the one I find most welcome is FINALLY the ability to configure desktop icons for single-click activation.

        I "get" the emphasis on stability, but now we'll be stuck with a badly out of date Xfce for a lengthy period until Wheezy is replaced. And I can SORT OF understand the decision to reverse course on what was once the plan for Debian to change the default desktop from GNOME 3 to Xfce (though I still on balance disagree with it and find it regrettable).

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          There's a repository for that: http://crunchbang.org/forums/viewtopic.php?pid=248917%23p248917
          What is most painful though is the old version of libc they are stuck on (2.13), half of all the Humble Bundle games won't work because they were compiled with something newer, so I'm thinking of switching to Mint or Arch this weekend.

        • Re:Freeze (Score:5, Informative)

          by anarcat (306985) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @06:08PM (#43487521) Homepage

          one thing with the recent developments in Debian is that once Wheezy is released, we'll start working hard on the next release, Jessie. And while unstable may finally be unstable for a little while after the release (while people upload a bunch of new packages), I have had a lot of success running wheezy while it was in testing in the last two years. I suggest that people interested in the "latest and greatest" install wheezy, then upgrade to jessie (testing) when it stabilises a bit after the release.

          That's what I will do anyways. :)

          • I couldn't have said it better. I've been running Wheezy for the past two months without issue, and when Debian 7 is released, all I need to do is aptitude update && aptitude upgrade and I will be at 7.
        • Re:Freeze (Score:4, Informative)

          by Sipper (462582) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @08:53PM (#43488593)

          ... since the default desktop for Wheezy is the unutterably awful GNOME 3.

          And in Debian Gnome3 now has a dependency on NetworkManager.

          Users of the Wicd networking manager should be aware of this, because NetworkManager conflicts with Wicd. Neither Wicd no NetworkManager work when they're both active, and at the moment there's no warning about this nor instructions on what to do about it. :-(

        • by deek (22697)

          You can always add the experimental repository to your source list, and install Xfce 4.10 from there.

          Debian pretty much always has the latest software available. You just have to look further than the "stable" set of packages. You can even have packages installed from different sources simultaneously.

          I have my system installed from "testing", and pick various packages from "unstable" and "experimental". It works beautifully, and is very stable, regardless of the source names. I also have the option to r

        • It's a STABLE RELEASE. Stable releases are only good for servers. If you want to use Debian on your desktop (which I imagine is the case, as I can't see why you would want a DE on your server), even running Testing is quite conservative.

          I tried running Debian Stable on my laptop back in '08 - I believe it was Etch at the time. I don't think they even had packages for my wireless drivers. Didn't take long to figure out that I had to point apt at Testing instead.

  • Maybe it was named for Louise Jefferson, from the TV show. Movin' on up!
    • by X0563511 (793323)

      ...or it was named after the Toy Story character, as it is well known that is how they codename Debian.

  • by Yohahn (8680) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @03:56PM (#43486295) Homepage

    I hope they can fix http://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=368297 [debian.org] before they ship.
    It seems horrible in this day and age that a Linux would exist that couldn't get basic functionality with ldap working.

  • Of particular interest to casual users, from the list of changes in 7.0: "Debian wheezy comes with full-featured libav (formerly ffmpeg) libraries and frontends, including e.g. mplayer, mencoder, vlc and transcode. Additional codec support is provided e.g. through lame for MP3 audio encoding, xvidcore for MPEG-4 ASP video encoding, x264 for H.264/MPEG-4 AVC video encoding, vo-aacenc for AAC audio encoding and opencore-amr and vo-amrwbenc for Adaptive Multi-Rate Narrowband and Wideband encoding and decoding,

    • Or just install whatever dev header packages you need and compile it yourself against your current libraries.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 18, 2013 @04:17PM (#43486485)

    What's new in Debian 7.0

    2.2.3. Hardened security

    Many Debian packages have now been built with gcc compiler hardening flags enabled. These flags enable various protections against security issues such as stack smashing, predictable locations of values in memory, etc. An effort has been made to ensure that as many packages as possible include these flags, especially focusing on those in the 'base'-installation, network-accessible daemons and packages which have had security issues in recent years.

    Now there are no reasons for using Ubuntu anymore. I do not remember being so excited ever!

    • by squiggleslash (241428) * on Thursday April 18, 2013 @04:58PM (#43486881) Homepage Journal
      Sorry, but unless it has APK's HOSTS file installed by default, I'm sticking with Ubuntu...
    • by tyrione (134248)

      I could give two cents about GCC compiler Hardening flags. Hell, the only interesting part of Debian is the fact its entire repo is gearing up to be LLVM/Clang compliant. The moment LLVM/Clang can compile Debian, RedHat, SuSE more acceptable Linux based distros is the moment big engineering firms switch the likes ANSYS, Catia, COMSOL, and others away from GCC and give themselves a celebration by welcoming LLVM/Clang with open arms. All of the work for OpenGL/OpenCL in the pipeline for MESA, and Video Driver

  • Donate... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by 101percent (589072) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @04:40PM (#43486725)
    If you would like to help out, check out the following link. Anything you donate will be matched by a generous donor. Note, this money goes towards DebConf13, the Debian developers conference (free admission to all). Lets get Jessie off to a good start! http://nylug.org/pipermail/nylug-announce/2013-April/001231.html [nylug.org]
  • by stms (1132653) on Thursday April 18, 2013 @04:42PM (#43486741)

    Will we be getting a multiarch build (armhf+armel) of this one? I found some info that said there would be multiarch for x86 (64-bit+32-bit) but I can't find anything for arm.

    • by godrik (1287354)

      I am currently using the multiarch x86. It works fine for libraries, but you can run into problem with executables. You can install libfoo in both 64 and 32 bit. But you can not do the same with programs. That should be fixed in the future, but is broken for now.

      armhf+armel, I do not know, but I'd assume it works just the same.

      • by KiloByte (825081)

        Why would you ever install the same program for two architectures at once, barring an interpreter that heavily uses binary modules? That's not supported by multiarch, and it's explicitely a non-goal.

        armhf+armel multiarch seems quite pointless to me as well, although it is supported. I for one have both i386 and armhf enabled on my amd64 box and i386 on my armhf one (you need external patches for qemu so wine can work, though).

        • by stms (1132653)

          The reason I wanted multiarch for arm is that I've been trying to set up a Minecraft server which require will require armhf java for performance reasons. I also wanted to run it over Hamachi for security and some other reasons I won't go into. But yeah if the software is open source someone is going to compile it for both and in that case it's kind of pointless.

  • Of particular interest to casual users, from the list of changes in 7.0: "Debian wheezy comes with full-featured libav (formerly ffmpeg) libraries and frontends, including e.g. mplayer, mencoder, vlc and transcode. Additional codec support is provided e.g. through lame for MP3 audio encoding, xvidcore for MPEG-4 ASP video encoding, x264 for H.264/MPEG-4 AVC video encoding, vo-aacenc for AAC audio encoding and opencore-amr and vo-amrwbenc for Adaptive Multi-Rate Narrowband and Wideband encoding and decoding

    • Define "casual user". If you mean a user who cares about this stuff, they probably understand it. If they don't care about this stuff, they may or may not understand it, but I don't see why it matters.

    • Casual users can stick with their playskool products written by accountants and marketers. In all fairness, I suppose it's not inconceivable that you can have a manager with no technical experience, but one who is still able to create a well-engineered product - I'd think this is very rare. To counter, look at how MS is doing with Balmer at the helm. I'll just stick with engineering products written and managed by actual engineers and other experts in the field, thanks.

      And you know what - when Windows slows

    • by Patch86 (1465427)

      Debian is hardly aimed at casual users. You may be familiar with its far more popular offspring, Ubuntu and Mint, which are built especially for that market. Debian remains firmly in the domain of professionals and enthusiasts; and that is a group who need catering for too

  • Have they finally come up with a free solution for media playback? Or have they compromised on their principles?

  • What changed? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by swillden (191260) <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Thursday April 18, 2013 @06:41PM (#43487757) Homepage Journal

    Does anyone know what changed to allow Debian to add MP3 and other libs? There has never been a technical problem with including them, but Debian has always tried to avoid violating patents by distributing patented (or claimed-to-be-patented) software.

    I'm glad they've been able to take this step, just wondering what happened.

  • LibAV's a badly forked version that's several revisions behind FFmpeg. Plus, this is Debian -- non-free codecs like H.264 are stripped out and are probably really supported by a seperate non-free repository.

    I'd rather strip LibAV out and compile my own version of FFmpeg for faster encodes.

    • by tyrione (134248)

      LibAV's a badly forked version that's several revisions behind FFmpeg. Plus, this is Debian -- non-free codecs like H.264 are stripped out and are probably really supported by a seperate non-free repository.

      I'd rather strip LibAV out and compile my own version of FFmpeg for faster encodes.

      Agreed. Debian fucked up Handbrake options, not to mention VLC is a clusterfuck half the time if one uses the LibAV from Debian. Use the Debian Multimedia debs elsewhere and you can that Debian legally unclean but more useful solution.

  • Its stable its been out over a year, have any distros picked it up yet?
    • by tyrione (134248)

      Its stable its been out over a year, have any distros picked it up yet?

      My last annoyance with Debian. 2.4 has been sitting in Experimental and utterly useless without current PHP5 support and much more. I've never seen the purpose of packaging highly visible applications within a distro only to leave them useless for months on end.

    • It's included in Slackware 14.0 and Slackware current.

      But there is a bug in "htpasswd" (bug 54735 [apache.org]), which has not been backported to the "2.4.x" branch yet.

  • I made an installation a week ago (a basic one from network boot) and apt-get install avidemux got me.. nothing. So, they're now boasting about multimedia but it's missing quite an obvious piece of software that is simple enough to use even if just for grabbing an extract of a video.
    I also suffered a few silly things :
    - The netinstall iso doesn't work if put on a USB drive with unetbootin. Had to install a tftp and dhcp server on another box. I didn't try the big CD and DVD images. This is a bit of a proble

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      We rely on volunteers to add software to Debian. People who want avidemux in Debian (like yourself) haven't bothered to package avidemux yet. Perhaps you would like to help improve multimedia in Debian and join the multmedia team?

      http://wiki.debian.org/Teams/Multimedia

      Please report bugs about the issues you found:

      http://www.debian.org/Bugs/Reporting

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