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Open Source Ubuntu Linux Hardware

How To Use a Linux Virtual Private Server 303

Posted by samzenpus
from the listen-up dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Game developer David Bolton writes: 'For my development of Web games, I've hit a point where I need a Virtual Private Server. (For more on this see My Search for Game Hosting Begins.) I initially chose a Windows VPS because I know Windows best. A VPS is just an Internet-connected computer. "Virtual" means it may not be an actual physical computer, but a virtualized host, one of many, each running as if it were a real computer. Recently, though, I've run into a dead end, as it turns out that Couchbase doesn't support PHP on Windows. So I switched to a Linux VPS running Ubuntu server LTS 12-04. Since my main desktop PC runs Windows 7, the options to access the VPS are initially quite limited, and there's no remote desktop with a Linux server. My VPS is specified as 2 GB of ram, 2 CPUs and 80 GB of disk storage. The main problem with a VPS is that you have to self-manage it. It's maybe 90% set up for you, but you need the remaining 10%. You may have to install some software, edit a config file or two and occasionally bounce (stop then restart) daemons (Linux services), after editing their config files.'"
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How To Use a Linux Virtual Private Server

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  • Oh fuck (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:29PM (#42244841)

    Hire a manager for it or learn to use it. How in hell is this in the front page?

  • n00b (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ilikenwf (1139495) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:31PM (#42244853)
    If you don't know how to do this, please hire someone. And use Debian stable over ubuntu for servers. It's much more stable and much less full of Shuttleworth.
  • Please stop (Score:5, Insightful)

    by WaffleMonster (969671) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:31PM (#42244857)

    Stop trolling us slashdot... this aint news and it aint a legitimate question... please just stop.

  • Re:Oh fuck (Score:5, Insightful)

    by xaxa (988988) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:31PM (#42244863)

    Because it's from Dice: http://news.dice.com/2012/12/10/linux-virtual-private-server/ [dice.com]

    (The company that bought Slashdot.)

  • by earlzdotnet (2788729) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:34PM (#42244897)
    What exaclty were you expecting? If you want your server to be all setup for you, you'll buy a managed server, and pay a hefty price-premium for them holding your hand the whole time. If you want to save money, then you'll read some man pages and tutorials and figure out how to set it up on your own. Also, if you think you "need" a GUI on your server, then you obviously aren't all that well experienced with server management. If you really can't do any of this on your own, hire a sysadmin. Any sysadmin worth their weight in salt know how to use a linux command line to setup something as easy as PHP and Apache. Hell, most VPS services these days provide template VPSs with these services already setup
  • Why is this here? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by neorush (1103917) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:36PM (#42244923) Homepage
    What in the world is this crap? I think anyone here who doesn't know:
    A. What a VPS is.
    B. How to configure a VPS (a.k.a SERVER ).
    Does know how to use Google. WTH editors.
  • by PlusFiveTroll (754249) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:37PM (#42244935) Homepage

    Why the fuck would use a window manager on a server. Just a good way to increase security exposure.

    The big problem here is the VPS user has no clue about his operating system, this will end in tears, most likely the hacker kind.

    Second is, linux server tools don't need a GUI. Even if you had one, you'd just use it to edit txt (conf) files.

    All you really need is putty and WinSCP.

  • Re:Oh fuck (Score:1, Insightful)

    by kc67 (2789711) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:41PM (#42244985)
    I would ask the same thing... it went from submitted, to blue, to front page...
  • Slashdot has died (Score:5, Insightful)

    by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:41PM (#42244989)

    Slashdot is dead, and this is its rotting corpse.

    WTF, I see why Taco left.

    No remote desktop in linux? Oh teh noes might have to use SSH like a big boy.

  • Re:Please stop (Score:4, Insightful)

    by VortexCortex (1117377) <`VortexCortex' ` ... -retrograde.com'> on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:42PM (#42244993) Homepage

    The above poster is insightful moreso than flamebait. It's fucking serious man. "Trolling" as in "Trolling for comments with a dumb-as-fuck baited question". Please, Slashdot. We value your minimal editorial skills, and now even those are lacking now. Stop trolling us. What's next? "How to use a Linux root terminal" posted by someone who's only ever used iPhones?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:42PM (#42245001)

    If you follow the link, you'll note it's not actually an "ask /." article. I think it's meant to be like a how-to, except written by someone who doesn't really know how to.
    Maybe it's ironic?

  • by Revotron (1115029) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:50PM (#42245079)
    Let me transpose this article to emphasize just how incredibly stupid this submission is:

    Hey guys, I'm a game developer and my computer doesn't run things that I need to use to develop games. So I bought a new computer. You see, a computer is a machine that runs software and computes things for you. It has a mouse, a keyboard, and a monitor. Some computers are big, but others are small. For instance, the computer I bought has 4GB of memory. That is more memory than other computers that have 2GB. When you buy a computer, it's maybe 90% set up for you, but you need to install the remaining 10% of things that you'll use and change the settings so it runs the way you like it. Computers are so neat.

    This article isn't even asking a fucking question. It's just somebody telling the Slashdot crowd what a VPS is. What the fuck?
  • by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:56PM (#42245143)

    Because it is not possible to automate and not really useful.

    Any task a gui can do a can be done faster without it.

  • by xaxa (988988) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:02PM (#42245215)

    Slashdot is dead, and this is its rotting corpse.

    Where shall we all go, then?

    WTF, I see why Taco left.

    No remote desktop in linux? Oh teh noes might have to use SSH like a big boy.

    That's not the best bit. From the fine^W fucking article:

    This is very handy if you don’t like the terminal file editor Vi (or Vim), as WinSCP provides an easier way to edit config files.

    and this:

    I started on PCs back in the pre-Windows days when DOS command line was the only game in town, but honestly, trying to navigate around a directory tree from a command line is a bit tedious! With WinSCP, it becomes easier as you get a higher-level view of the folder structure.

    This bit's odd:

    Interestingly, the Linux VPS seems about 10 times faster than the same spec Windows VPS.

    (I don't mind the guy having his blog, and everyone starts learning somewhere. There's just no way it belongs on /., let alone the front page! I wonder if chose to write it, thinking it was useful, or was told to write it for Dice?)

  • by Detritusher (1031752) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:13PM (#42245349)
    Step 1. Learn to use *nix as it was designed to be used, through the shell. I know you skipped this step because you think cPanel is a good idea.
  • It is a wonder... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by drkich (305460) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [enilhcikd]> on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:14PM (#42245353) Homepage

    It is a wonder Linux has such an image problem with anyone, but the converted. Granted this article may not be the best, but let's do a quick google search for the actual article that the poster is refering to:

    http://news.dice.com/2012/12/10/linux-virtual-private-server/ [dice.com]

    David Bolton talks about what he did. Good or bad, he documents it and shares it with his readers.

    What do I read here, explatives, degrading remarks, and just plain snobbery. Here and there are some useful remarks. What I was hoping is to read a helpful discussion on what he recommends/did and what could be done better and how. There is so much vitriol to sort through, I don't even bother.

    Pathetic.

  • by Xtifr (1323) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:20PM (#42245399) Homepage

    II think it's meant to be like a how-to, except written by someone who doesn't really know how to.

    God, I think you're right. Truly pathetic. Maybe I'll write a How-To Use Windows Server article that complains about the lack of proper command-line and web admin tools, and the lack of /dev/ and /etc/ directories. It would make about as much sense as this nonsense.

  • by riley (36484) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:30PM (#42245515)

    The OP is using as a server. I'd hope he is following best practices and developing locally (and securely) and deploying on the network. Especially if he is unfamiliar with the production environment.

    Ultimately, the OP should probably install VirtualBox or another virtualization solution on his/her Windows 7 desktop, and figure out the deployment strategy before exposing their work on the network. It doesn't cost anything but a little bit of time, and the pay off is understanding what you are pushing out in the real world.

  • by l3v1 (787564) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:32PM (#42245537)
    I've been reading /. for some years now.

    When I read this post, first I thought it was some kind of joke.

    Then I started to feel the urge to hit someone, really hard.

    Seriously people, how the heck does a beginner's beginner's noob's writing like this land on /.?

    Teenage Linux beginner bloggers do better than this.

    You people need to reset your quality checking methods, and fast.
  • by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:38PM (#42245597)

    Maybe because slashdot.org is not the place for this kind of BS?

    If this was Dummies.com or keyboardsscareme.com then I could see it. If you do not know what you are doing I highly recommend not showing that to everyone by making a webpage about your ignorance.

  • by TheCarp (96830) <[ten.tenaprac] [ta] [cjs]> on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:38PM (#42245607) Homepage

    As for the security risk, you are mostly correct. There is little exposure to running an X app over ssh. A few theoretical issues maybe but, nothing serious.

    The thing is, its not what us experienced unix folks do, and with good reason. I have spent more time writing custom scripts to add and manage users than I have used gui tools to manage them. Its nice to be able to click and add a user, its nicer to be able to write a script so I can do it exactly the same way every time, or hand that duty off to someone else with sudo privs and not have to worry about giving him root access, or to implement some custom system where passwords are auto-generated and mailed out etc.....

    Frankly the problem isn't the gui tools per se. Its that a linux system is very complicated with a lot of moving parts. On the plus side, this means you can tear it down to the bear minimum and customize it to your hearts content, only limited by your imagination and skill, On the minus side, you can really get out into some major weeds to the point that even the best admins will be calling it a rebuild.

    If you are just getting by on gui tools, you are asking for trouble.... HOWEVER..... I don't want to entirely knock them. *I* started out with them. Since then however, I have totally abandoned them. When I use X11 over ssh, you can bet its because I am using something that just gives me no other way. (some software installs...ugh)

    My advice would be...if someone wants to seriously go down this path...do it...but do it knowing full well its going ot be a major learning experience. I would setup a second VPS or even a system at home, just to experiment with....

    If you really want to get competent:
    1. Find out what your tools are REALLY DOING. Find out what the command line equivalents are, see what the differences are.
    2. Don't fear vi. It is less true these days that you are likely to find yourself sitting in front of a dead system at 3 am and the only tool that works is vi. Especially on linux (more so than many more traditional systems) vi is not your only option, nor your only good one. All that said.... it *IS* the gold standard for sysadmin editors. Its what the cool kids use ;) Its also more powerful than you can possibly imagine. It is worth learning.
    3. Consider learning some shell script. Its very powerful, its also the exact same language you type at the shell. Learning shell syntax will save you time, even if you never save anything to a fixed script.
    4. Remember this is a job people get paid and paid well to do. You are dabbling in my career here. Don't expect to be an expert over night, and don't make too many commitments. I have been at it for 12 years professionally.... it takes time and experience to get good.

    That said.... it seems this is all about web game development? If so....hey.... development? Have a blast man! However, if you are expecing to actually run code for public consumption? I would be a bit worried, expect downtime while you figure it all out.

  • by mu51c10rd (187182) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:52PM (#42245751)

    I would love to see your article posted on the front page of Slashdot like this one. At least I know yours would be written in a humorous vein...

  • In Other News... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Zalbik (308903) on Monday December 10, 2012 @04:54PM (#42245779)

    In other news:

    "Some Random Moron writes: 'For my reading of email, I've hit a point where I need a PC. (For more on this see My Search for Email Clients Begins.) I initially chose a Windows 7 PC because I know Windows best. A PC is just a "personal computer". "Personal" means it is an actual physical computer, running as if it were a real computer. "Computer" means it's an actual physical computer, running as if it were a real computer. Recently, though, I've run into a dead end, as it turns out that Windows 7 doesn't support Sparrow. So I switched to a Linux PC running Ubuntu desktop 12.04. Since my main smartphone runs iOS, the options to access my mail are initially quite limited, cause I'm a moron, and don't know how to use google. Though I pretend to be a web developer, I'm entirely outside my comfort zone if there isn't a big bold "easy button" for any trivial task I attempt, even when that task has been solved, posted about, blogged about, and had software specifically written to solve my exact issue. The main problem with a PC is that you have to self-manage it. It's maybe 90% set up for you, but you need the remaining 10%. You may have to install some software, edit a config file or two and occasionally bounce (stop then restart) daemons (Linux services), after editing their config files.'"

    Seriously....can't remote into a Linux server? WTF?

  • by Alex Belits (437) * on Monday December 10, 2012 @05:14PM (#42245967) Homepage

    Ever.

  • by MaskedSlacker (911878) on Monday December 10, 2012 @05:18PM (#42246021)

    Many photo editing tasks can be done faster without a gui.

    Resizing, cropping, converting, compressing, etc.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 10, 2012 @05:27PM (#42246115)

    Have you done manual partitioning of gpt partitions (no fdisk)? Do you really enjoy cutting and pasting hugh block numbers around? Is there anything that is a fraction as intuitive as gparted?

    While I still drop out to a command line for 1/3rd of my copy commands, when plucking 12 "unlike files" out of a directory of many and placing them in a another, CTRL-clicking them feels noticably faster than typing them or playing with expressions to try to pick them out of the noise...

    If the server served printers (though I doubt the poster's does), I have to admit the graphical cups interface is nice....

    So is it still time to raise our fists in the air and shout: Yggdrasil 94 forever!

    Or are we turning the corner on intuitive command line replacments?

  • Just one point (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Peter (Professor) Fo (956906) <sdot1108@nOSpAm.PeterFox.ukfsn.org> on Monday December 10, 2012 @10:19PM (#42248349) Homepage
    If you edit a text file you know what you've done. For a sysadmin that's quite important. With a GUI 'things happen'. Are your changes in one file or a dozen? When will the next be backed-up. If you restore some of them and not the others then what? I really like tools I can point a mouse at to flip a switch rather than having to trawl through acres of 'documentation' and then test hoping I've got the case-sensitive flags right and the actual version matches the docs or is compatible with foo, but for sysadmin work you need to learn tricky text files that are the links in the chain you lead your tiger by.
  • Hosting and VPS (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 11, 2012 @06:44AM (#42249050)

    If you want a motorcycle without motor, you buy a bicycle, not a "motorcycle without motor".

    If you want a VPS, it is because you want to control as much as possible.
    If you want a "ready server", buy a hosting of this type, like a plesk panel.

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