Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Graphics Open Source Linux

Mesa 9.0 Released With Open Source OpenGL 3.1 Drivers 79

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the death-to-directx dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Mesa developers released Mesa 9.0 with open-source OpenGL 3.1 driver support. This de facto OpenGL Linux implementation now supports the several year old OpenGL 3.1 specification for Intel hardware while the other drivers are still at OpenGL 3.0 or worse. Other features to Mesa 9.0 include completing MPEG1/MPEG2 video acceleration, early OpenCL support, bug-fixes, and new hardware support." OpenGL 3.1 support is limited to Intel hardware, but at least ATI/AMD hardware supports some of OpenGL 3.1. A few features from OpenGL 4 were also added.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Mesa 9.0 Released With Open Source OpenGL 3.1 Drivers

Comments Filter:
  • by smitty_one_each (243267) * on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @07:02AM (#41594577) Homepage Journal
    Mesa same as me,
    Slashdotty as I can be,
    Loving software free,
    Cleanshaven, save goatee.
    Burma Shave
  • I would like to switch away from the Windows (I already am not touching Macs unless forced to), and this nice improvement in graphical performance might just be a step in the right direction for me to do the full switch at some point. Unfortunately I still am pretty dependent on the Adobe package for graphic tools in my line of work, but I hope to see the alternatives get there fast now that Adobe has consistently been pissing on its own leg for a longer period of time. And then there are the games. Pray te
    • Unfortunately I still am pretty dependent on the Adobe package for graphic tools in my line of work, but I hope to see the alternatives get there fast now that Adobe has consistently been pissing on its own leg for a longer period of time.

      There has been no strong push to provide alternatives for the Adobe-applications, so why would there be anything such now all of a sudden? I do not see the situation changing for years to come.

      And then there are the games. Pray tell this situation will improve.

      With Steam arriving on Linux things may slowly start turning for the better, but that too will take years. Basically if the game you want to play hasn't already been ported over or doesn't work satisfactorily via Wine then be prepared to wait for a good, long while more, and do not expect old games to be ported over,

      • by Quakeulf (2650167)
        I work primarily with digital graphics. My experience with Adobe products is making me feel like they don't care anything anymore as they have a sort of monopoly on 2D imagery. I hope they're not going deeper into 3D as I would hate to switch from Blender, which is my current favourite creation tool for all things threedee. Maybe it's patents that is keeping others from entering the 2D digital creation world to take on Adobe, but I do not really know. Really, I would like Linux to be a great choice for grap
        • Autodesk dominates the closed source 3D market much like Adobe dominates the closed source 2D market. Other people don't try to enter the market because it is bloody hard to write software which can compete with these products. Even Microsoft bought Softimage at a point then gave up and sold them off to Avid. Today Softimage is owned by... Autodesk. Autodesk, not content with having 3D Studio, bought Softimage and Maya. Today there is little competition left. There are lots of patents in the area but I don

      • There has been no strong push to provide alternatives for the Adobe-applications, so why would there be anything such now all of a sudden? I do not see the situation changing for years to come.

        What? Never heard of the GIMP for bitmap drawing or Inkscape for vectorial drawing? IMO Inkscape is superior to Illustrator. I even use it in Windows.

        The situation is more dire for video editing where there are several programs with somewhat laughable feature sets like you would see in entry/mid level video editi

        • What? Never heard of the GIMP for bitmap drawing or Inkscape for vectorial drawing? IMO Inkscape is superior to Illustrator. I even use it in Windows.

          Of course I have heard of those, you misunderstood my point. I even use GIMP on Windows on almost a daily basis. But as I said, there is no actual PUSH to provide alternatives to the Adobe software stack, and even many GIMP developers themselves don't view GIMP as an alternative to Photoshop so much as an entirely different thing altogether. Also, GIMP, Inkscape et.al. are totally separate applications; there is no interplay between them like there is between Adobe's own products.

          The interesting thing is the best library for multimedia is probably libavcodec and its open source.

          I personally am partial to

          • But as I said, there is no actual PUSH to provide alternatives to the Adobe software stack, and even many GIMP developers themselves don't view GIMP as an alternative to Photoshop so much as an entirely different thing altogether.

            So what? That's the first common misconception about FLOSS and 'other' software in general. Linux does not try to be Windows replacement, GIMP does not try to be a Photoshop replacement, Evolution does not try to be an Outlook replacement and so on and on...if you stop seeing "replacements" and start seeing independent software projects instead, it will make your life easier. Sure, some or most of them have the same area of interest, but most FLOS software does not try to be a drop-in replacement, they try

      • by dexotaku (1136235) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @09:07AM (#41595325)

        There has been no strong push to provide alternatives for the Adobe-applications, so why would there be anything such now all of a sudden? I do not see the situation changing for years to come.

        Um. What? Seriously, what?

        This .. the lack of usable, powerful equivalents [that don't require an engineering degree or at least mindset in order to learn how to use, like software such as Blender] to such applications as:

        • * Photoshop [GIMP ain't there yet, but it's getting closer - the next major release may shift this considerably, when they add 16bpc image support among other things]
        • * Lightroom [Raw Therapee is getting -really- close but metadata interoperability with Adobe apps via XMP or equivalent is basically a requirement for professionals to take it seriously]
        • * Premiere .. or Sony Vegas .. or farther up the line, AVID et al [there are literally no even remotely-near-equivalents in the video NLE arena, basic editors - sure, but anything more advanced doesn't exist, though again - development -is- at least taking place in tools to build up to that degree of functionality - we'll probably be there in the early 2020s]
        • * After Effects [no even remotely-near-equivalents at all, no development that I'm aware of]
        • * Indesign [Scribus is inching forward but there are a few interface obstacles that make it simply bizarre to use for anyone who's ever used "pro" layout software .. even Pagemaker 4 - from the early 1990s, for Windows 3.1 - is still functionally superior]

        ... are basically what are holding back *all* of the people I know who would like to switch away from Windows but can't due to the requirement of usable production tools [for business -or- any other use].

        There are some shining examples [look for an audio NLE on linux and there are several very decent competitive options to programs like Vegas, Audition, Sound Forge, etc., or check out Inkscape for graphic design] as well of course, but there are various reasons why those may not be suitable solutions too [such as the multitude of choices on linux of who-knows-how-well-they're supported low-latency audio driver subsystems which may make required things like synchronous multitracking impossible with a given piece of equipment or even particular distro].

        I occasionally teach uni [mostly arts] how to use graphic design / video / audio software; many can't afford Macs [where the Adobe applications and other stable equivalents already exist and credulous, uneducated users aren't even aware of or simply don't care about the walled-garden[s] that will affect what they can do with their own hardware] and among those who can't, the majority would like nothing more than to switch away from using Windows.

        My observation of reasons for resistance to the adoption of linux by the sections of the populace that I deal with on a regular basis [musicians, videographers, video/audio editors, graphic artists, photographers, professional academics of many stripe[s], writers, etc.] are thus:

        • #1 the lack of serious production tools - closed- or open-source, free [as in beer] or not .. almost everyone I know would GLADLY pay Adobe or whomever fistfuls of dollars for native linux versions of their applications *just* to be able to get away from Windows.
        • #2 is the lack of native iTunes because so many people are inextricably tied to Apple's store [half of the reason I refuse to open an iTunes store account or for that matter purchase any iDevice - the other half being that I both can't afford to and also refuse to effectively pay more to get less overall functionality/control].
        • #3 is, predictably, gaming [Steam may alter this somewhat].

        I have helped a number of people [including both children and seniors] switch to linux, but their usage profiles are pretty uniform: they're content consumers, not p

        • by Prune (557140)

          Well, Wine is always an option. Photoshop runs in Wine without a problem.

          Additionally, one of the most important graphics production applications, Autodesk's Maya, runs natively on Linux and has absolutely no difference from the Windows version.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @07:20AM (#41594655) Homepage

    More and more as home computing becomes about appliances instead of about general purpose PCs and more and more, different detail markets are looking to Linux to make these things happen, video chip makers who have bet most of their business on Microsoft-only support will soon need to rethink that notion.

    Long ago, no one thought IBM could be humbled. No one could have imagined Novell becoming a novelty. And no one in Windows-centric IT shops want to admit that the vast majority of internet and databases out there are running on Linux servers and services.

    Things are shifting but some people aren't noticing or believing.

    F* You NVidia... F* You.

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @07:42AM (#41594763) Journal

      I get the impression(whether this is better or worse is another question) that makers of video chipsets understand that Linux support is necessary to win certain markets(embedded Android stuff, *nix graphic workstations, compute clusters, etc.); but that "support" does not need to mean anything other than 'set of binary blobs that work with the one blessed kernel version and system configuration. If you are the purchaser of a consumer product, suck it up. If you have a suitably large enterprise support account, please contact our engineering/integration team.'

      In the 'appliance' market, you aren't even supposed to touch the software, just twiddle the 'apps' on top of it, and much of the hardware(even when the components are well understood and fairly standard) is overtly hostile to tinkering. Yes, the chipset vendor had better have a Linux BSP if they want to make a sale; but(based on the state of 3rd-party Android ROMs), they definitely don't have to do it in a way that is overly helpful to 3rd parties.

      In the expensive Workstation and Compute Stuff market, you have customers who will pay good money, sometimes excellent money, to Make It Work; but you also have customers used to the fact that 'Product X is only supported on RHEL Antiquated Edition with Nvidia Drivers v.Y'.

      • by kthreadd (1558445)

        I hope that it doesn't stop at just Linux support. I'm actually OK with there being proprietary drivers as long as documentation is available so that we can build open drivers as well. In an ideal world all drivers are open.

        • by cpghost (719344)
          Exactly. What good is a binary blob for a specific version of the Linux kernel, when you need to run this piece of hardware on another incompatible version, on another architecture, or, say, on another open sourced OS like, say, FreeBSD? We don't need vendor lock-in through binary blobs; Open Specs is what we need. Support can then be provided by volunteers.
  • by DMJC (682799) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:14AM (#41594927)
    More importantly... Nouveau is starting to become performance competitive with the Nvidia Binary Blob. As Mesa adds features and rapidly catches upto the closed drivers, it'll surpass them for performance if not features. The time is coming quickly when the drivers built into Linux will be better than the official ones.
  • Go find a Linux driver. I think I prefer to stay Windows. Maybe you'll find someone else to help you. Maybe Mesa... THAT WAS A JOKE. Haha. FAT CHANCE. Anyway,Windows 7 is great. It's so delicious and moist.
  • by westlake (615356) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:56AM (#41595237)
    The documentation for Mesa begins --- short and sweet --- with this simple one line description:

    Mesa is an open-source implementation of the OpenGL specification - a system for rendering interactive 3D graphics.

    The Mesa 3D Graphics Library [mesa3d.org]

The 11 is for people with the pride of a 10 and the pocketbook of an 8. -- R.B. Greenberg [referring to PDPs?]

Working...