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Cloud Red Hat Software Linux

Red Hat Releases Preview Version of Open Stack Distribution 37

Posted by samzenpus
from the sneak-peek dept.
hypnosec writes "Red Hat has announced the availability of a preview version of its OpenStack Distribution that would enable it to compete with the likes of Amazon which is considered one of the leaders in infrastructure-as-a-service cloud services. The enterprise Linux maker was a late entrant into the OpenStack world where players like Rackspace, HP and Internap have already made their mark. Red Hat's OpenStack distribution enterprises can build and manage private, public, and hybrid infrastructure-as-a-service clouds. These companies will not only be competing with the likes of Amazon, but will also be competing against themselves to get a bite out of the IaaS cloud. What started as a project has quickly developed into an open source solution that enables organizations to achieve performance, features and greater functionality from their private and/or public clouds. The announcement of OpenStack Foundation acted as a catalyst toward the fast-paced development of the platform."
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Red Hat Releases Preview Version of Open Stack Distribution

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  • 2011 was the year of Linux on the Cellphone (Android) with over 60% of sales. 2012 is looking like the year of Linux on the Tablet with linux distributions on the best-selling Amazon and Nook tablets/kindles. Is year of the desktop next??? (I won't hold my breath.)

    • by Trepidity (597)

      This particular offering seems to be in a more traditional Linux strength: Linux on the Server. OpenStack is intended for computing infrastructure, not for end-user desktop use.

      • "OpenStack is intended for computing infrastructure, not for end-user desktop use."

        Whose to say? Openstack is an VDI target as good as any other and being open, once it's a bit more matured (and no question Red Hat with help to that) a very strong competitor to the likes of VMware on private and/or hibrid clusters.

        Given that Red Hat is positioning itself in the VDI field and in the cloud infrastructure management, you do your own math with ease.

    • by Burning1 (204959) on Monday August 13, 2012 @07:26PM (#40978907) Homepage

      Probably not in the form it takes now. Android based devices do a lot to improve usability of Linux, and feel pretty damn forign to anyone with heavy unix experience. On the upside, they are very easy to manage. If linux makes it to the desktop, it won't be in the form we see now.

    • by dbIII (701233)
      Calling android linux is a bit like calling linux gnu. The parts may be there but it doesn't really define the whole.
      I'd like real linux on tablets. Android doesn't even have a fully working version of X yet let alone all the other software you can run as part of a linux distribution.
    • 2011 was the year of Linux on the Cellphone (Android) with over 60% of sales.

      For very small values of 60%.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Requirements:
    Red Hat OpenStack Preview only works with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3 or higher. You'll need a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription for each server you install with Red Hat OpenStack.

    The fine print:
    The software you are downloading is for testing purposes only. It is a preview version of a future commercial product that Red Hat is working on. It is free, unsupported, and not for production use. The preview is initially based on Essex and will be updated to Folsom when it is released.

  • by agristin (750854) on Monday August 13, 2012 @11:23PM (#40980817) Journal

    I'd rather use Fedora 17.

    From the FAQ:

    It supports the Essex version and will support the next rev when released, but this part bothers me:

    "What are the requirements for using the preview software?

    A: The preview version of the Red Hat OpenStack software only works with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3 or higher. You'll need a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription for each server you install with the Red Hat OpenStack software."

    It maybe less work than with Fedora 17- but 17 includes OpenStack and has a how to get started (some bash-ing required).

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Getting_started_with_OpenStack_on_Fedora_17 [fedoraproject.org]

  • Does anybody have some good recommendations for cloud servers?

    I.e., a setup that would allow you to easily add webservers and possibly database servers as demand increases and decreases?

    Using Ubuntu or RHell?

    Preferably working with Rackspace et alia in addition to Amazon.

    • by AJodock (1901718)

      Does anybody have some good recommendations for cloud servers?

      Well the really cool thing about these clouds is the API that allows your services to manipulate the servers.

      Imagine a couple of app servers behind a load balancer, that are monitored by another service. This monitor service can watch response times and as traffic grows and the response times increase the monitor service can hit the API and deploy another app server. Once the app server is running the monitor service can hit the API on the load balancer and add the new node into the spray. Once traffic d

  • by Heretic2 (117767) on Tuesday August 14, 2012 @01:36AM (#40981421)

    "Should we care?" is what I'm trying to figure out. Redhat has lost almost all relevance in the Cloud-arena. CloudStack is in Apache Incubation, and OpenStack Essex is already live in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. Redhat's OpenStack is presumably all KVM-based as it's built on RHEL6. Does it support bare-metal Cloud instances? Granted, this feature is 'beta' on CloudStack, but it is still there to use.

    It seems like a desperate play to stay relevant. With Redhat's "virtualization brain trust" posting erroneous [chucknology.com] and irrelevant [chucknology.com] FUD while moderating/rejecting all replies, it appears there's a severe lack of strategy outside of "stop all the Xen-based clones with dom0's based on our OSS distribution!" Redhat shot themselves in the foot pushing KVM down people's throats to thwart Oracle and Citrix clones.

    As someone that's built Private Clouds, and runs significant amounts of infrastructure, I personally have a hard time caring. None-the-less, I'm checking it out to see if the Swift object storage part is in any way cleaner integrated. If it's just some pre-built, probably back-level RPMs, I'll be highly unimpressed.

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