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Linux From Scratch 7.1 Published 94

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-the-manual dept.
Thinkcloud writes "The Linux From Scratch (LFS) project has published version 7.1 of its manual for building a custom Linux installation. The new release of the step-by-step instructions is 345 pages long and uses more up-to-date components than previous versions – for example, the 3.2.6 Linux kernel and version 4.6.2 of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC). The update also includes fixes to bootscripts and corrections to the text, as well as updates to 20 packages."
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Linux From Scratch 7.1 Published

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  • by dyingtolive (1393037) <brad.arnettNO@SPAMnotforhire.org> on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:03PM (#39279895)
    ...I didn't want to see the girlfriend this weekend anyway.
  • by mykepredko (40154) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:09PM (#39279979) Homepage

    When I saw the headline, I thought that the article described how you could create a linux kernel using http://scratch.mit.edu/ [mit.edu]

    Which would have been a hell of a neat trick.

    myke

  • LFS is a great learning process that shows you exactly WHAT makes your Linux tick, and what packages depend on eachother. Anyone who uses Linux should do it at least once.

    And really, it is not that difficult.. if you follow the guide it is very unlikely you will have problems. And on modern hardware the compile is very fast.

    • by MattBD (1157291) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:34PM (#39280389) Homepage
      I second this. A couple of years ago I built an LFS system - unfortunately I buggered up the GRUB install somehow and couldn't fix it, so I wound up overwriting it with Slackware instead. Next time I have a go at it, I'll probably use a desktop rather than a laptop perched on the bed - it was not nice being sat there waiting hours for stuff to compile!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by h2k1 (661151)
      Ten years ago i was an enthusiast of lfs, and i even made a Makefile for automated build of lfs... It was an extremely fun thing to do, and opened my eyes and made me understand that Slackware was the only prebuild distro that anyone should ever need for home use.
    • ... and do it in Cygwin targeting x686. I've done it :P

    • by Skapare (16644)

      Oh yeah, LFS is fun. I ported mine to my old Sun Sparc box.

    • by msobkow (48369) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @08:25PM (#39282445) Homepage Journal

      I agree completely. I built an LFS system many years ago just to better understand the process a distribution goes through and to get a better grasp of the overall software components and build approaches used by Linux systems overall.

      It was a highly educational experience, but I'll stick with Debian-based systems that use APT updates, thank you very much. While educational to roll your own installation, rolling your own updates is incredibly time consuming.

    • by tixxit (1107127) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @08:47PM (#39282653)

      Anyone who uses Linux should do it at least once.

      Did it while I was in school. Glad I did it, but wouldn't do it again. Everything was great, but software got out of date quickly, and upgrading anything in the middle of the dependency tree or higher just required too much time and baby-sitting. Just took way too much time to maintain.

      • by Rich0 (548339)

        If you want something more maintainable I'd suggest Gentoo. It gives you most of the flexibility of LFS, and exposure to enough of what is going on that you're likely to keep learning. It is also a lot easier to keep up-to-date.

        • by tixxit (1107127)
          I actually moved to Gentoo from LFS. And to Ubuntu from Gentoo. I've simply run out of time in the day to spend installing/maintaining software.
      • by doti (966971)

        Same with me.

        Did it once while in university, and it was ran as my desktop system for many months.
        Just gave up because it was hard to upgrade the system.

        But it was a rewarding experience.
        Glad I did it while I had some spare time, as I feel never in my life I'll be able to do it again.
        Or maybe when I'm retired?

        • by tixxit (1107127)

          But it was a rewarding experience. Glad I did it while I had some spare time, as I feel never in my life I'll be able to do it again.

          Exactly. I miss school... mostly for the craploads of free time I had.

    • LFS is a great learning process that shows you exactly WHAT makes your Linux tick, and what packages depend on eachother. Anyone who uses Linux should do it at least once.

      No. Anyone who works with Linux, develops for Linux, is a Linux sysadmin or just happens to be interested should do it at least once. Then there's us who prefer distros of the more automated type (I'd rather avoid terms like "beginner-friendly", "user-friendly" or "bloated" but you probably know what I mean). People who use some flavour of Linux simply because it fits our needs. We shouldn't go anywhere near LFS.

  • eBook formats? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:27PM (#39280289)

    There's a PDF and an HTML version of their manual. With the advent of eBook readers like the Kindle, you think they'd release an eBook version. ePub is more open than Kindle's .mobi, but even an ePub version is easily convertible to .mobi.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      There's a PDF and an HTML version of their manual. With the advent of eBook readers like the Kindle, you think they'd release an eBook version. ePub is more open than Kindle's .mobi, but even an ePub version is easily convertible to .mobi.

      If only they would make some sort of Portable Document Format...

    • Re:eBook formats? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @06:33PM (#39281195)

      We use the Docbook XML schema to markup the text of the book. There is support in the Docbook XSL stylesheets for producing ePub output and I tried it once (despite it requiring Ruby which I have no other use for), but the output wasn't particularly good looking. It probably just requires some tweaking to the stock stylesheets, but I didn't have the time to look into it any further than that. I know it's a cop-out, but patches welcome :-)

      Matt Burgess (LFS editor + part-time release manager)

      • Re:eBook formats? (Score:4, Informative)

        by JanneM (7445) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @08:33PM (#39282517) Homepage

        It would be very welcome, and (cop-out alert) had I had the time I would gladly have taken it as an excuse to learn about ebook formats.

        An ebook version would be great, simply because it's searchable. But then, you want to take advantage of the format to create a really good, interactive index, perhaps links to a glossary and to external pages for all the included applications and so on. Suddenly it's no longer a quick format conversion but a whole new document.

        So yes, I understand why you're reluctant to take it on.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      There's a PDF and an HTML version of their manual. With the advent of eBook readers like the Kindle, you think they'd release an eBook version. ePub is more open than Kindle's .mobi, but even an ePub version is easily convertible to .mobi.

      If only ePub used HTML... then we could write a trivial converter that took HTML pages and zipped them up and call it an ePub.

      Oh wait, that's what ePubs are!

      Though, ePub uses a restricted subset of HTML - but it does support stuff like CSS. Heck, i think the Kindle format

    • by reub2000 (705806)

      I think if you where going to use this, then you'd probably want the ability to copy and paste that exists in the html version.

    • by LatePaul (799448)

      Use Calibre to convert it.

  • Dear Slashdot (Score:3, Interesting)

    by oldhack (1037484) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:32PM (#39280349)

    How about a button to collapse a comment thread? Stick a little toggle button to each displayed comment to collapse/expand it and its children comments.

    It would make it easier to skip over off-topic pedantic comment threads (or whatever thread the reader prefer to disregard) that often run interminably long while burying more germane comments far down in the page.

    • Re:Dear Slashdot (Score:4, Insightful)

      by characterZer0 (138196) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @05:34PM (#39280387)

      What do you want differently than what clicking ont he subject does?

      • by oldhack (1037484)
        By "collapsing" I mean to hide the child comments entirely including the subjects, with just a marker button, perhaps on the root comment's subject line, to indicate if there is any child comments. This way the comment thread/subtree I'm not interested in will not take up any vertical space.
    • by tpotus (1856224)
      Click the comment title, Einstein.
      • by jjohnson (62583)

        How is it obvious that clicking the comment title collapses and opens the threaded discussion following it? What part of "comment title" says to you "window shade"?

      • by JanneM (7445)

        Comment titles are not clickable for me.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    To build Linux from scratch you first have to ... Make universe

        Carl Sagan

    • by Zilog (932422)
      ~ # cd /usr/src/universe
      /usr/src/universe # make
      /usr/src/universe # make install

      Done.
  • by X0563511 (793323) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @07:02PM (#39281605) Homepage Journal

    The LiveCD is unmaintained and can't build 7.0 or newer.

    Are there any other bootable environments that could build this, or is one supposed to run this from an installed host now?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Well... the last I built an LFS system, I went to the only source of a known functional toolchain without jumping through 300 needless hoops I could think of... I unpacked a Gentoo stage3, chrooted, and started my LFS build from there (which, no, does not mean a necessity to actually *install* Gentoo on the host system. I was working from an old RIP USB I had on hand).

    • Re:no livecd (Score:5, Informative)

      by dkleinsc (563838) on Wednesday March 07, 2012 @07:39PM (#39281977) Homepage

      LFS can typically be built from any Linux host system - a Knoppix CD or a liveCD for any other distro would probably work.

      Or you could just check the host requirements [linuxfromscratch.org].

      • As someone who is currently undergoing a LFS install into a VirtualBox VM, I can confirm that the use of a live environment (live-CD, or what-have you) works perfectly. I am currently building my LFS under the Linux Mint 11 x86 gnome CD. As for the build itself - wheeee!
      • by chiph (523845)

        I was bummed after looking over the LFS intro, in that you aren't building Linux on a bare machine -- you're starting with a pre-installed distro of some kind.

        I would be more interested in replicating the process that Torvalds went through when creating the OS.

        • Re:no livecd (Score:5, Informative)

          by dkleinsc (563838) on Thursday March 08, 2012 @10:53AM (#39287639) Homepage

          You're coming as close as you can to building Linux on a bare machine without manually inputing machine code - the purpose of the host machine is to give you things like:
            * a running kernel
            * a shell
            * a C compiler
            * a linker
            * The standard C libraries
            * Some very basic text processing tools, like awk and sed
            * A way to download the source code
            * A way to set up a file system on the disk
          IIRC, Linus Torvalds used an existing Unix for most of this when he was first writing Linux.

          The first steps involve setting up a completely empty partition, then compiling the C library (glibc), linker (binutils), C compiler (gcc), a shell (bash), and a few other tools. Then you chroot onto the partition you just set up and work in your chroot jail, with the only dependency on the original distro being the running kernel. Once you get to the point of having a bootable system, you leave the original distro completely behind.

          • This is all true... but... the previous poster is complaining about the lack of a live cd, and i agree with them. I built my LFS system from their live cd (a few years ago now), and i suspect a lot of folk would like to approach it this way. If you are starting with bare metal, a convenient livecd is exactly what you need.
        • I was bummed after looking over the LFS intro, in that you aren't building Linux on a bare machine -- you're starting with a pre-installed distro of some kind.

          I would be more interested in replicating the process that Torvalds went through when creating the OS.

          IIRC Torvalds had Minix pre-installed on his machine while he was first building Linux.

  • Is there any similar thing for BSD? I'd like to do something similar w/ OpenBSD - make a WRT out of it, but don't know how. So such a guide, but w/ OBSD, would be really helpful.

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