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SuSE Linux

OpenSUSE 12.1 Released 174

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the lizard-people-for-parliment dept.
MasterPatricko writes "The openSUSE project is proud to present the release of openSUSE 12.1! This release represents more than eight months of work by our international community and brings you the best Free Software has to offer. Improvements include the latest GNOME 3.2 desktop as well as the newest from KDE, XFCE and LXDE; your ownCloud made easy with mirall; Snapper-shots of your file system on btrfs; and much, much more. Other notable changes include moving from sysvinit to systemd, improving the boot process, and being built on GCC 4.6.2 including link-time optimization. More packages than ever are available from the openSUSE instance of the Open Build Service, and soon you'll be able to create customized respins on SUSE Studio."
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OpenSUSE 12.1 Released

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  • Woot! (Score:1, Funny)

    Woot! All 3 users are jizzing in unison over this announcement!

    • Re:Woot! (Score:5, Funny)

      by Captain Splendid (673276) <capsplendid.gmail@com> on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @02:38PM (#38076090) Homepage Journal
      Actually, only 2. I switched to Debian this year.
    • I've been a suse user since 8.1, and have tried many distros (ubuntu, debian, gentoo, mandriva, fedora, etc). I prefer suse. So yes I use openSuSe on my laptop and desktop.
      • by mcgrew (92797) *

        Hmm, I use to use Mandriva (Mandrake before that) and am on kubuntu now. It's been well over ten years since I tried SUSE, iirc the only probelm I had with it was a flaky video driver, and from what I've seen since I'm pretty sure they've patched that one up. I'll have to give it another try.

        Wouldn't you know it, I just upgraded my kubuntu box over the weekend. Oh, well.

        I was happy to find that the latest kubuntu has Samba turned on by default, and was able to see shares from my win 7 notebook, and then at

      • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

        by rubycodez (864176)
        I *used* to be a SuSE user, until Novell made deal and took massive monies from Microsoft. To hell with Novell
    • Re:Woot! (Score:4, Interesting)

      by nzac (1822298) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:19PM (#38076618)

      I assume you have never actually used openSUSE.

      Its a European distro so is never on the American "list" of distos that are recommend to try. Novel going with microsoft never helped though that's the excuse to troll it now rather than having any current justification that MS has effected openSUSE.

      • Nope, I tried SuSE (Score:5, Interesting)

        by HalAtWork (926717) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:39PM (#38076878)
        That's silly. When Novell bought SuSE, they gave away kits at nearly every consumer electronics show, including those in america, that's how I got mine. They also offered to mail them out free if you couldn't find one in your local area. That was for SuSE 9. I've still got mine. Prior to that, a friend had been paying for SuSE since 7 (I'm not sure what the deal was, apparently it was hard to obtain free because of YaST, or update services, or something?). At the time though, I was getting into Fedora and had a much easier time with it. I didn't want to use SuSE because you did everything through their proprietary configuration interface (YaST), and I wanted to learn a more "standard" way of doing things that would apply to all distros. Since I was just testing the waters at that point, I didn't want to have to learn something I couldn't use elsewhere. Not only that, but many how-tos would refer to editing .conf files, and YaST would throw up errors and try to replace my manually configured file every time I wanted to do something like this. It also seemed much easier to find .rpms for RedHat, or .debs for Debian.

        Ultimately I ended up using Ubuntu, because at one point there was a controversy over Fedora with regards to versions not being supported very long or at all, or being bleeding-edge-only, and I wanted something a little more stable. I also got bogged down in RPM hell because I did want to try certain packages that were not officially supported, and repositories that packaged them didn't have common dependencies, and although I tried compiling the software myself, there were compile issues I had trouble resolving for certain software.

        Now I'm trying out Debian, to gain experience and progress in my knowledge of the GNU/Linux platform on something that's not too far off from what I'm using now.
        • by wintercolby (1117427) <winter...colby@@@gmail...com> on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:54PM (#38077058)
          Actually, all decent Linux distros come with some form of proprietary configuration tool. One can configure SuSE and OpenSuSE about as easily as RedHat, in fact most of the configuration files and log files are identical between the two. The big difference there is that SuSE has an excellent configuration tool where one can go to do all of their GUI administration. It's really well done, and makes RH tools remind me of Windows for Workgroups. Any good admin can configure their system quickly from the command line, I make many of my modifications with sed, awk or vi. You don't have to use the very well made config tool if you don't want to.
        • by pnutjam (523990)
          I adopted SUSE back in the 8.x days because the only spare computer I had was an old laptop. I tried dozens of linux versions and only SUSE reliabley detected hardware and allowed me to use the wireless card. OpenSUSE still has better hardware detection then any other linux distribution. For awhile I switched to Ubuntu because some sofware was packaged for debian and not for suse, but the Suse has been closing that gap agressivley. Suse Studio is also one of the most amazing products. I will be startin
        • by nzac (1822298)

          I am referring to home desktop usage as I assume the OP was. Such as in i don't like Ubuntu/fedora /. recommends fedora/Ubuntu and if you don't like that try Mint/Debian and if those fail well you wont like Arch/gentoo so you may as well go back to windows. Notice that openSUSE is ignored. I think opensuse should be the second recommended 'fall-back', after 'fedora/Ubuntu'.

          I didn't want to use SuSE because you did everything through their proprietary configuration interface (YaST), and I wanted to learn a more "standard" way of doing things that would apply to all distros.

          I'm fairly sure for some (possibly all Yast appears to read config files for the options) options is just a front end to a config file w

  • by IANAAC (692242) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @02:31PM (#38076010)
    I've been on Ubuntu for some time now, but with 11.04 and 11.10, it's not been as stable as I'd like.

    Plus, the last time I used JAD 1.0 (based on Suse) it was rock solid. Anybody know the specifics of what's installed besides desktop environs? That seems to be all they've listed at their site.

  • by TommyGunnRX (756664) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @02:42PM (#38076144)

    Is it me or has Gnome 3x neutered the desktop? When I first used Gnome 3 with F15 I really liked the clean and cutting edge look. But 15 minutes later I choked on the fact that Gnome 3 had me bent over and handcuffed... doing things the way they wanted.

    I looked at the screenshot and couldn't really tell if I was looking at Fedora or openSUSE, save the open browser content.

    I LOVE what Linux Mint has done. They've incorporated the best of Gnome 3 and greatly improve the experience.

    Oh, and YEAH for openSUSE, high-five!

    • by Grishnakh (216268) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:18PM (#38076614)

      I looked at the screenshot and couldn't really tell if I was looking at Fedora or openSUSE, save the open browser content.

      This is by design. The Gnome developers want all Gnome installations to look exactly the same. Jon McCan't even said in an interview that he doesn't want you using any themes or customizing your Gnome desktop in any way, because this diminishes Gnome's look, and other people watching you at your computer won't be able to tell it's Gnome. Basically, the Gnome devs are trying to copy Apple and their totally non-customizable UIs, thinking that if it works for Apple, then it'll work for them too.

      • by mcgrew (92797) * on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:40PM (#38076892) Homepage Journal

        Hmmm, I never did like Gnome. This makes me like it even less. IMO the best thing about Linux is unlike Windows, it works the way YOU want it to work. With MS (and from what you say, now GNOME) it's their way or the highway. Nope, it's MY computer, not some gnome's box.

        • 100% agree.

          This is why fvwm, xmonad, ratpoison, etc all exist. The unix philosophy has always been that the user is king. I like it that way, and I dislike some of the recent trends.

      • by couchslug (175151)

        "Jon McCan't even said in an interview that he doesn't want you using any themes or customizing your Gnome desktop in any way, because this diminishes Gnome's look, and other people watching you at your computer won't be able to tell it's Gnome."

        That's a fine reason to work against Gnome and steer new users away from it. "It's a half-arsed Apple imitation by fanbois who hate choice as much as Apple."

        If they want Apple they should BUY Apple and get the "good" parts of that walled garden.

  • the anl, tds mirrors the and direct link downloads all truncate at ~325MB of 4.3G
  • I am happy for the new release- but will it be hard to install with the nice GNOME 2 or do I have to switch exclusively to XFCE?
    • by nzac (1822298)

      There will be repos in multiple locations roll back to Gnome 2.
      I suspect they will not be found on the front page yet though.

    • by PReDiToR (687141)
      Install with anything you like, then use YaST to remove the crap and install whatever you want.

      There might even be a version of KDE3.x in a repo somewhere if you really want to see openSUSE doing what it did best.
  • distros are so 90's

  • It works nicely! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I've been using it on x86 and x86-64 systems for a month or so and it is working quite well.

    The announcement above neglected to mention that its running the 3.1.0 kernel and that plus the new compiler/libraries will make life interesting for those of us that live and work in the IT world. Other updates like systemd will also have interesting consequences. Most apps seem fairly happy living and playing on 12.1 however those using CommVault may expect some real pain.

    For those that use RHEL and SLES/SLED in

  • by SharkByte (206338) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @03:31PM (#38076768)

    Given the general negative reception of GNOME 3 (and Unity and to a lesser extend still also KDE 4), it surprises me that I haven't seen it much mentioned on the net that KDE 3 is back as a DE choice. Now if only the MATE (GNOME 2 continuation) was also included...

    • by amRadioHed (463061) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @04:57PM (#38077998)

      As far as I've heard, the only negative reception KDE 4 still gets is from people who haven't used it since 4.1 was released.

      • by richlv (778496)

        i'm using 4.6. i still regularly see tasks overlapping in the taskbar, kmix ends up with some binary crap in xml and then decides to stop working & eat 100% cpu, upon startup it does "something" for good 10 to 15 seconds before i can launch any apps, notes plasmoid right now has part of the text invisible, network statistic plamsoids/widgets/whatever are still way worse than knetstats was for kde3...

        kde4 is usable, and some features are nice. but damn, 3.5.10 was rock solid. kde4 still has way, way too

        • by timbo234 (833667)

          "oh, and there's one long lasting bug even since kde3 - ctrl+shift+c to copy from konsole doesn't put the value in klipper :)"

          I just tried it right then on an Opensuse 11.4 system (KDE 4.6) and it works.

  • This one looks good, maybe I will try it... push me away from Ubuntu is kind of hard... http://www.montuori.net/ [montuori.net]
  • by fiddley (834032) <partiedout&hotmail,com> on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @04:21PM (#38077406) Homepage
    Right, MS Zealot here, love their stuff and earn a living from it, but always want to keep my options open, just in case (as well as increasing my nerd rating, of course!). After flirting with linux multiple times since slackware '96, last weekend I've given it yet another go and I'm posting right now from the previous version of SUSE. It's the first distro I've ever installed and EVERYTHING seems to work. I've tried Linux about 20 times, but had given up after a few hours of mucking around because my mouse, or my graphics card, or my sound or my network or SOMETHING wouldn't work. Finally I've found one where everything works! I've been on it a week, and apart from not knowing how to do anything, the only problem is my fans sound like they're about to take off.

    So, I'm struggling with the basics, but learning a little every day. Does anyone know a decent Windows-Linux Conversion guide which explains the parallels between the two - such as how to install drivers, where the hell is 'Program Files', what do I do if I want to install software but it's not an rpm or whatever it is suse uses. (Damn, I miss MSIs & EXEs!)

    Also, is there any mail client I can use to connect to my exchange server for work email? (using MAPI \ RPC over HTTPS)

    This is quite a lot of fun, and I've noticed that it seems to render flash video nicer than windows, BBC iPlayer HD is a bit stuttery on windows, but is smooth as silk over here.

    Any hints and tips gratefully received!
    • by nzac (1822298)

      Does anyone know a decent Windows-Linux Conversion guide which explains the parallels between the two - such as how to install drivers, where the hell is 'Program Files', what do I do if I want to install software but it's not an rpm or whatever it is suse uses. (Damn, I miss MSIs & EXEs!)

      Drivers are always an issue in Linux. You said everything works, what divers do you want? If you want the system tray config options gui chances are the hardware manufacturer does not support Linux.

      You really want to find the (preferably SUSE) RPM to install something (its much tidier) if not you generally need to follow the instructions on the website for the software you want to install. If they don't want to support openSuSE then you are on your own and need to Google for someone who has made it work.

    • by JCholewa (34629) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @06:00PM (#38078978) Homepage

      > MS Zealot here

      Liar. You're no zealot. ;P

      > Does anyone know a decent Windows-Linux Conversion guide which explains the parallels between the two - such as how to install drivers, where the hell is
      > 'Program Files',

      In POSIX systems (Linux, Unix, BSD, QNX, Mac OS X in some cases, et al), files are split up depending on their role. You know how your settings go in "%APPDATA%\", libraries to in "%SYSTEMROOT%" and other stuff goes in "%PROGRAMFILES%\"? Well, in these systems, it is split up moreso, Generally, all binaries (the executable files) go into "$PREFIX/bin/", global configuration files go into "$PREFIX/etc/", unchanging data files go into "$PREFIX/share/", libraries go into "$PREFIX/lib", log files and changing system files (the print spool, for instance) go into "/var/". Just like in Windows, the system magically handles it all. (note: $PREFIX is usually "/usr", but it is sometimes something else -- I won't get into it here, but there are pretty good reasons for this).

      > what do I do if I want to install software but it's not an rpm or whatever it is suse uses. (Damn, I miss MSIs & EXEs!)

      That's a weird one. What do you do if it's not an msi or an exe in a Windows system?

      rpm is the equivalent of msi, except that the package management is generally easier to work with. In suse, you go into Yast's "Software Management" app and it will list most programs (several thousand, generally, organized in categories and easily searchable) that people would need to install. Think of it as "Windows Update", but instead of offering programs that Microsoft makes, it offers programs that everyone makes (or like an app store, except that it's been in Linux for over a decade and doesn't cost money). On the command line, the equivalent is "zypper". You'd type "sudo zypper install firefox", for example, and firefox would be updated. But anyway, if you're using Yast, I suggest going into the "Software Repositories" section, clicking the "Add" button, choosing the "Community Repositories" radio button, and clicking next. The "Packman" repository is highly recommended, as it has a lot of apps that the suse people lack.

      rpm files are what you use as an *alternate* solution if the program is not in an available repository, not as your primary means of installing stuff. Repositories can manage installation of prerequisites. You might have tried to install a program requiring .NET in Windows at one point and received an error stating that it was not installed. In the repositories, and situations like that would be subverted by the repository manager going online and downloading/installing what it needs to install the package you actually want.

      Sometimes, a developer will release the equivalent of an exe installer for their product. nvidia is an example. This is a TERRIBLE IDEA that you sometimes just can't work around. Running an unknown executable as the administrative user is just asking for pain. I know, because one of my scientists here wiped out his server's entire filesystem by running an install script as root, and I had to pick up after him. rpm (in suse, mandriva, pclinuxos, red hat, et al) and deb (in debian, ubuntu, mint, et al) and various others give limited powers which simply allow the application to get its files in the right place and do some basic maintenance (like starting a daemon if it's a server app).

      The third option that people seem to think is ubiquitous in Linux (it isn't ... unless it's a hardcore science research app) is that you're given the source code and you have to compile it. In 90% of these cases, the only real problem is that you might not have a prerequisite app or library installed to complete the compilation. Package management helps with that, but it's better to avoid having to do this. Still, most of the examples you just go to the command line, visit the directory, type "./configure && make install" and have some coffee. I don't remembe

    • As you've probably figured out, YAST is your friend. It's like a Control Panel / RegEdit combo -- puts a lot of system options in a mostly well organized GUI for changing with mouse clicks. As far as drivers go... YAST is where you go to configure a lot of them.

      "Program Files" doesn't really exist. Instead, an environment variable called "PATH" contains a list of commonly used app folders like /bin, /usr/bin, etc. Downside: you may not know where your binaries live. Upside: You generally don't need
    • That alone should make you a happy panda.

    • by timbo234 (833667)

      "what do I do if I want to install software but it's not an rpm or whatever it is suse uses. "

      In opensuse the 2nd stop for packages is http://software.opensuse.org/ [opensuse.org] as unfortunately not everything that's packaged is in the default repositories.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Does anyone know a decent Windows-Linux Conversion guide which explains the parallels between the two - such as how to install drivers, where the hell is 'Program Files', what do I do if I want to install software but it's not an rpm or whatever it is suse uses. (Damn, I miss MSIs & EXEs!)

      Drivers come with the OS and any that don't, the installation is distribution-specific, this being one of the original defining qualities of say Ubuntu vs. Debian. Where the program files are stores depends on the distribution as well, and you ask the package manager where the package's files are stored; anything that doesn't get integrated into the operating system with its files spread all about is usually placed into a directory in /opt. A deb or rpm is just like an MSI, and the GNU file tool/command wil

  • by shuttah (2475982) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @11:42PM (#38082156) Journal
    ...(for desktop use) and am using OpenSUSE not out of preference, but just to get myself familiar with other systems. Alsa worked flawlessly (as opposed to Alsa having minor issues in my previous distro, Debian Testing/Wheezy). I haven't gotten the hang of YaST for package management just yet, but zypper... the command line front-end to YaST, is very powerful. You add a switch and a URL to the zypper command to add repositories, and there are a multitude of command shortcuts available for software installation. I've been using zypper a lot since installation, and as a Debian user for three years i can say it's certainly giving APT a run for it's money. The software available for OpenSUSE is great, but the whole PORTAL documentation way of organizing it has been a little difficult to get used to at times. Again, i've just been using this for a week so that may not be the most educated judgement. Anyway, default repositories are - SUSE Updates, debug, source, OSS Software, and non-OSS Software (OSS = Open Source Software). Additionally, the Packman repository for OpenSUSE makes available pre-built RPM's for another large assortment of software. They currently don't have a US mirror, but being in New York and using the UK mirror... the speeds are fine. What's interesting to me is OpenSUSE is using systemd (by Lennart Poettering who also did Pulseaudio and avahi). Anyway, have a lot of fun. Hope i don't sound like too much of a salesman here.

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