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KDE Media Software Linux

Kdenlive 0.8 Adds Advanced Features for NLV Editing 182

Posted by timothy
from the all-it-needs-is-celebrity-endorsement dept.
dmbkiwi writes "For a long time I've been a big fan of Kdenlive. I've written two articles about it. One is a general overview of video editing on Linux and the other is more specific to Kdenlive. For a number of years, video editing on Linux – at least at a consumer level — has been patchy at best. This is somewhat ironic given the heavy use of Linux in major Hollywood blockbuster film production. However, with the advent of Kdenlive, things are looking pretty good and with the release of version 0.8, there have been some great features added for the more advanced users, while still retaining a simple and easy to use UI."
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Kdenlive 0.8 Adds Advanced Features for NLV Editing

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  • Official list of changes, not some blogpost -- http://www.kdenlive.org/discover/0.8 [kdenlive.org]
  • Ediiting (Score:3, Funny)

    by psergiu (67614) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @06:25AM (#35989654)

    What's this "Ediiting" (with double-i) mentioned in the title ?

    • I'd be happier if they stopped calling it "NLV Editing", as if Kdenlive allowed you to edit non-linear video. Excellent research there, senor editor. You've created a submission title that is completely incomprehensible to everyone except its target market, which has to work almost as hard to figure out what it means.

      (To be fair, there's an NLE package called "Pyxis NLV", but that's pretty much the only intentional usage on the entire internet.)
  • by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @06:54AM (#35989750)
    I use a folder full of tens of thousands of BMPs and some perl scripts that move them around as I command.
  • by JewGold (924683) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @07:08AM (#35989790)
    Before working to add new features, why not first make it so you can use it for 5 minutes without it segfaulting? How about making it so your savefiles aren't constantly becoming corrupt? Kdenlive shows great promise, but it's the least stable piece of software I've ever used.
    • by Urza9814 (883915)

      Maybe it's specific to your distro. Works great for me on Arch. But I switched from Mandriva a couple months ago, and have noticed a couple programs that I used to think were somewhat buggy suddenly run flawlessly...

  • This is somewhat ironic given the heavy use of Linux in major Hollywood blockbuster film production.

    "Heavy use" is a huge overstatement. Yes, there have been some notable films in which special Linux applications played a part, but I don't think there's been a single "blockbuster" that was produced on Linux gear start-to-finish. I would be surprised if there was a single big-budget film that used Linux for the audio work.

    I'm not saying the day will never come, but it's not there yet.

    • by Urza9814 (883915)

      Disney, Pixar, Dreamworks:
      http://linux.slashdot.org/story/05/07/27/1551250/Disney-DreamWorks-Pixar-Go-Linux [slashdot.org]

      1500 desktops and 3500 servers at Dreamworks alone running Linux. Sure, they probably don't do _EVERYTHING_ on Linux, but it's certainly a huge part of their operations. They obviously don't do _EVERYTHING_ on Windows or Mac either. With those numbers, it seems fair to say that there is heavy use of Linux in production...

  • Somewhat ironic? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kenh (9056) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @07:59AM (#35989882) Homepage Journal

    From the above article:

    "This is somewhat ironic given the heavy use of Linux in major Hollywood blockbuster film production."

    No, it isn't - he is confusing a render farm with an editing deck - a film could easily have a thousand machines in it's render farm, but it is a rare film that uses more than a handful of editing decks. Typically you can count them on one hand, and have enough fingers left to go bowling with...

    That throw-away line in his post above prevents me from thinking his "overview" of consumer-level editing of video on Linux will be anything worth spending time on.

    • No kidding. The big NLEs that I'm aware of are Avid Media Composer (Windows and OS-X), Adobe Premiere (Windows and OS-X), Final Cut Pro (OS-X), and Sony Vegas (Windows). As noted, none of them run in Linux.

      Also just because you find Linux behind something in a pro field, it does not mean it is "ironic" that you don't see it in a similar consumer field. Where Linux excels is embedded applications. Basically if you have a specialized setup with specialized hardware that is dedicated to a purpose, Linux is a g

    • by linuxpyro (680927)

      There is some confusion here, because Linux's use in this area is mainly for visual effects, which is different from editing. Of course Linux is used on renderfarms mostly, but it is also used on the desktop for things like compositing and 3D work. In fact, work on Avatar was mostly done on Ubuntu [dustinkirkland.com] (the article mostly talks about their render farm, but also mentions desktops).

      That said, I think some high-end editing systems do run Linux, like Flame which has been mentioned here.

  • http://arstechnica.com/open-source/guides/2010/01/video-editing-in-linux-a-look-at-pitivi-and-kdenlive.ars [arstechnica.com]

    Conclusion

    Demand for video editing tools is only going to increase. This is an area where Linux desperately needs to be competitive if there's hope for the Linux desktop going mainstream anytime soon.

    PiViTi and Kdenlive show promise, but neither application is fully "there" just yet. PiTiVi is stable and intuitive, but lacks features. Kdenlive is very feature-rich, but needs to be stabilized just a bit; and some work could be done to make it more user-friendly. My first recommendation for doing video editing on Linux is definitely Kdenlive at this stage, though. It may not be as capable as a tool like, say, Final Cut Pro, but it does have most if not all of what many users need from a video editing application.

    Progress is being made, but some work is needed to take these applications the "last mile" to be entirely suitable for mainstream use.

    • by inflex (123318) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @08:45AM (#35990058) Homepage Journal

      This is an area where Linux desperately needs to be competitive if there's hope for the Linux desktop going mainstream anytime soon.

      Okay, look, I know we all believe that we know what's best for the market and what's in demand - but I am so sick of hearing this line pulled out. "What Linux really needs is ***** if it's to become acceptable in the mainstream". The reality is that there's no single app that will propel Linux into the mainstream magically, the best we can do is just continue to improve where we can and as we do we pick up more and more converts. We are long past a position where a single application will suddenly make Linux mainstream. For every application/area you knock off that list there will always be another one that raises its head.

      I'm not saying we shouldn't be doing our best to deliver great new apps of good stability and functionality (like Inkscape, Scribus etc), I'm saying that the sky isn't falling if we don't deliver X Y or Z.

      Paul.

      • by grumbel (592662)

        The reality is that there's no single app that will propel Linux into the mainstream magically,

        A single up won't make Linux mainstream, but not having that single app can very certainly hold it back from ever getting there, as people want an OS that can serve all their needs, not just 90%. The second you give people a reason to boot back into Windows, Linux will become that toy OS again with which they might play around once in a while, but which they won't actually ever use for their daily use.

        • by inflex (123318)

          Maybe it's the developer in me. One becomes proficient with eye-rolling every time someone vouches for their wanted feature "because without it your software will not become mainstream". It's a self-serving tactic, trying to get what you want by pushing the fear of obscurity, which likely just takes time away from more needed work. We all have different ways of trying to coax the world to our bidding, that one tends to make me put it into the last position in the consideration queue. It happens in all a

      • by westlake (615356)

        'm not saying we shouldn't be doing our best to deliver great new apps of good stability and functionality (like Inkscape, Scribus etc), I'm saying that the sky isn't falling if we don't deliver X Y or Z.

        The problem here is that Inkscape, Scribus, and the rest, are routinely ported to Windows or begin as a native Windows app. There is no compelling reason to migrate to Linux.

        "PiTiVi" hurts my eyes - and "Pitiful Video" is an all too plausible mnemonic. I have never understood why the FOSS dveloper insists on shooting himself in the foot.

      • by Kjella (173770)

        Okay, look, I know we all believe that we know what's best for the market and what's in demand - but I am so sick of hearing this line pulled out. "What Linux really needs is ***** if it's to become acceptable in the mainstream". (...) We are long past a position where a single application will suddenly make Linux mainstream.

        Not one application, but one application suite - the problem is that one is a steep mountain to climb. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook = Microsoft Office Pro (plus a bit more junk, but they're not that relevant). Taking down one won't be enough because they sell as a package, if you try buying them individually forget all deals. The only deal you get is if you take the whole Office package.

        If you could topple that then many, many office PCs would switch to Linux, together with web based apps most would not

    • There's also OpenShot and, at some point, Lombard. I initially used PiTiVi but I found OpenShot to be superior in most ways, though PiTiVi's UI is a bit more polished (but then, it just does a lot less). Just installed Kdenlive, and it looks fantastic, I'll try that the next time around. For instance, it apparently supports freezing a frame out-of-the-box, something neither PiTiVi nor OpenShot can do AFAIK. Hmm... actually, I guess you can set the speed to 0x in OpenShot, that'd should accomplish the same t

  • I've been using Kdenlive ever since it's port to Qt4, and it works very, very well. It has tons of options and effects, so even the most novice users can make something nice with a little effort. It has a bit of a leaning curve, but any "pro" software usually does. It fits in well with my desktop and Pulseaudio, even though I use GNOME and not KDE. If you've given up on video editing for Linux and haven't tried Kdenlive, you really should try it. It's not the most feature-filled editor, but it's great for c

  • I like Kdenlive, but I can't edit most over-the-air HD content. Most of the time when I import the video clip, the video is white (effectively no video), but there is audio.

    Video plays in Xine (but audio messes up) and VLC after a brief stutter at the start plays the audio and video perfectly.

    Despite posting samples from videos, nobody has come up as to why Kdenlive does this. I can only guess that the software starts recording in the wrong part of a GOP, and that's what is screwing up the playback / editin

  • by sakti (16411) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:16PM (#35991100) Homepage

    I don't do much video editing, but another one I've read is supposed to be decent is openshot.

    http://www.openshotvideo.com/ [openshotvideo.com]

    They are at version 1.3 and have nice documentation.

    • by Timmmm (636430)

      I've tried it. It's still about as far from usable as Kdenlive, Cinellera, and the others.

      In fact the only video editor I've used on linux that remotely works is blender. It still has a few issues but it is *much* closer to a proper solution than any of the others.

    • Hey, I've used openshot, lives, cinnelerra, kino.. and KdenLive is by far the most versatile with the exception of blender which is far beyond the scope of most normal users. To be honest with you this thread seems a bit like a hack job, and in some ways really insulting to the creators of KdenLive, and to anyone who's actually used it.
      Try it out though, if you've used openshot, you'll feel right at home.

  • What are currently the options of linear video editors available on Linux? I know there is dvswitch, but any competing projects in that direction?
  • What the fuck? What is "NLV" editing? I've got years of broadcast and editing work under my belt and I've never once heard that term. Maybe it should be "NLE"? or just "video editing"?

  • You cannot be serious about this application competing against Avid, Apple, Adobe and others, right? Final Cut X is the one to beat.
    • Actually, right now, Final Cut is behind Adobe Premiere in turns of features and speed - even on Apple hardware.

      I came to the conclusion that Final Cut was behind Adobe Premiere. That situation may change when the new version of Final Cut is released, as it will finally be a 64-bit application. But right now, it seems a number of professional video editors have jumped ship to Adobe running on high-end PC hardware with NVidia graphics running Adobe's Mercury Playback Engine on their CUDA cores which speeds u

  • Sorry, but there are no Linux video editing suites that don't suck compared to Adobe Premiere and Final Cut Pro. The ones that have the most features - and most don't even have enough for real consumer home video editing, let alone professional video editing - are ridiculously unstable - even compared to Adobe products which are notorious crap.

    There is only ONE former commercial product which has been recently open sourced which seems adequate - LightWorks:
    http://www.lightworksbeta.com/ [lightworksbeta.com]

    Check out these featu

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