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Linus Goes Hollywood At Pre-Oscars Party 131

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the getting-his-mad-props dept.
alphadogg writes "For those who feel like Linux and open source have been slighted by Tinseltown in the face of its embrace of Facebook and The Social Network, you'll be heartened to know that the Father of Linux, Linux Torvalds, and his wife Tove were among the beautiful people at Saturday's pre-Oscars Night Before Party in Beverly Hills. Torvalds blogged about the Oscars party experience Monday, recounting a series of awkward encounters with movie stars."
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Linus Goes Hollywood At Pre-Oscars Party

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  • Linux (Score:5, Funny)

    by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Monday February 28, 2011 @06:32PM (#35342200)

    the Father of Linux, Linux Torvalds

    Ahh, good old Linux Torvalds. I wonder if he brought his son Android, Andy for short.

    • by c0d3g33k (102699)

      Seriously.

      alphadogg - you suck.*

    • by microbee (682094)

      That's a son after a fork.

      • by peragrin (659227)

        shh!! that fork is Tove's little secret.

      • by Locke2005 (849178)
        Laugh if you will, but I constantly have to remind both my wife and my sister-in-law that the "r" in "fork" is NOT silent... and yes, it is a little unnerving when your sister-in-law asks you, "Would you like a fok?"!
        • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

          by corbettw (214229)

          it is a little unnerving when your sister-in-law asks you, "Would you like a fok?"!

          Why? Is she fat? She sounds fat, with her obsession with tableware.

          • by Locke2005 (849178)
            Uh, no. My wife is quite attractive; people used to tell her all the time that she should be a model, and she even had an offer to go to work for a strip club (she declined). My sister in law is 7 years younger and even more attractive than my wife, and has noticeably larger breasts than my wife's 36-D's. She also dresses quite provocatively, and in many ways in nicer to me and more compatible with me than my wife, you has the exact opposite personality as I do. In short, it's unnerving because "foking" her
            • by corbettw (214229)

              Bottom line, flirting should never be unnerving, even if it's with someone you want to, er, fork and who is forbidden fruit for one reason or another. Just relax and go with it (but don't follow through with your sister-in-law, that has zero potential to end well no matter what happens).

            • by tehcyder (746570)
              Michael James: Did you find a job?
              Victor Skakapopulis: Yeah, I got something at the striptease. I help the girls dress and undress.
              Michael James: Nice job.
              Victor Skakapopulis: Twenty francs a week.
              Michael James: Not very much.
              Victor Skakapopulis: It's all I can afford.
          • by Shikaku (1129753)

            Or maybe... it's just her accent. There's a joke:

            One day, a gal from Tennessee was serving a guy New York, and she sat him down. The ordeal was normal, he ordered the food and got it, but the girl forgot to bring silverware. So the New Yorker exclaims "Excuse me, can I get a fouk 'n spoon?"
            The gal shouts in response that it is very impolite to swear, and the New Yorker responds, "Miss, I just want a fouk and a spoon!"

          • by tqk (413719)

            Get the fok outa here! :-)

            And "Linux Torvalds" is a beautiful name.

        • Are they Italian? [youtube.com]

  • Good lord...
  • by Anonymous Coward

    He mentions asking people "Who are you?" and 'recounts' (mentions) only two specific encounters.

    Not at all the titillating and medium-long read that the summary promises.

  • by Petersko (564140) on Monday February 28, 2011 @06:41PM (#35342288)
    "For those who feel like Linux and open source have been slighted by Tinseltown in the face of its embrace of Facebook and The Social Network"

    Well stop sending scripts in EMACS and insisting that Hollywood attach them to the end credits. Pilots in theora don't help either.
    • Actually, Hollywood is just an Emacs mode, which uses Eliza as a back-end to generate scripts.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by greed (112493)

        I see. Is it because of your mother that you say, "Hollywood is just an Emacs mode"?

      • I think if they really did use Eliza to generate scripts, the scripts generated might be a little more original.
        • by Sulphur (1548251)

          I think if they really did use Eliza to generate scripts, the scripts generated might be a little more original.

          How long has originality concerned you?

    • by tool462 (677306) on Monday February 28, 2011 @07:44PM (#35342890)

      I implemented my script as a lazy-evaluated list. You can seed it with starting values like "Once upon a time" or "It was a dark and stormy night" or even "I'm sorry Mr. Pizza Man, I ran out of money. Is there any other way me and my 20 lesbian sorority sisters can pay for that Italian Sausage?"

      It'll keep giving you new lines based on the ones before it. The only boundary condition I put on the list length was the eventual heat death of the universe (likelihood of being eating by a grue = 1)

      It got its trial run on the TV show Lost. The producers would just keep requesting lines until they filled their time slot. Then they'd just cut to black and play an ominous screeching violin sound at the end of each episode and call it "suspense." It had a couple bugs though where it would get stuck in these self-consistent story loops that made it seem like there was some deeper meaning. We'd have to go in and tweak something every now and then just to get it to move on. The most embarrassing error was where it would dump out 4 8 15 16 23 42 repeatedly which was just some garbage in memory after reading an unterminated string.

      • by game kid (805301)

        "I'm sorry Mr. Pizza Man, I ran out of money. Is there any other way me and my 20 lesbian sorority sisters can pay for that Italian Sausage?"

        Now that, I would pay extra on every visit to see in 3D.

  • I Can Identify (Score:4, Insightful)

    by hduff (570443) <<moc.liamg> <ta> <ffudtyoh>> on Monday February 28, 2011 @06:42PM (#35342302) Homepage Journal

    I've met a few famous people and, unless they spend a lot of time being famous for just being themselves, they really don't look or act a lot like the characters they play and are famous for. Take them out of context and you'll hesitate before calling them by name.

    • I figured this one out shortly after watching Eddie Murphy's stand up when I was a teenager. When I was younger, I saw Murphy in various Disney/kids movies...then I heard the things he said in his "adult" comedy and figured out what "acting" meant.
    • by CorSci81 (1007499)
      I live in Hollywood and have this happen to me a lot. I've seen a handful of celebrities over the years I recognized and probably dozens more have passed me on the sidewalk without even registering as "someone". It took me about 5 minutes to figure out Chris O'Donnell was in line in front of me once and I still had Google after the fact to be sure since I was too timid to just ask while he was standing there instead of just looking awkward.
      • by Obfuscant (592200)
        Who is Chris O'Donnell?

        Seriously, isn't "Hollywood" one of the most ridiculous phenomena on the planet? What other trade has half a dozen different (inter-)nationally broadcast "awards" ceremonies where everyone gives everyone else trophies just for doing their job?

        I'm including the music industry in that set, since they are nothing more than entertainment, too.

        Just imagine how much benefit there would be if the money and time spent on the Oscars and the Tonys and the whatever-it-is was spent on something

        • by CorSci81 (1007499)

          Who is Chris O'Donnell?

          Apparently his career resurfaced on one of those many generic network TV crime drama shows, but I recognized him from the dreadful Batman & Robin movie that came out about a decade ago that I wish I could forget.

          Seriously, isn't "Hollywood" one of the most ridiculous phenomena on the planet?

          It is exceedingly ridiculous. Fortunately Hollywood the neighborhood of Los Angeles isn't very much like "Hollywood" the film industry. I wish someone would explain that to all of the tourist

        • by boxwood (1742976)

          The Awards shows are part of marketing the movies. If a movie wins an Oscar then it can be re-released and more people will go see it because it won an oscar. The movie studios spend a good deal of money lobbying members of the academy to vote for their movie to get an oscar so they can make this extra money. This is why they hated it when Return of the King won so many oscars because everyone had already seen it, whereas if a lesser known movie won those oscars it would mean a lot more money for that studi

      • I live in Santa Monica and the place is crawling with celebs. I haven't recognised a single one in five years, though I have been told on a number of occasions I was rubbing shoulders with so and so or nearly bumped into such and such, or all those security people are in the store because grand high poobah is shopping at the moment. Usually I don't know who so and so or such and such is or which movies they appeared in, nor am I particularly interested in improving my knowledge in that regard. I would recog

        • Oh, a little anecdote, I have a friend who is a pop star in an Asian country and when we used to hang out I would usually pay more than my share of the bill. I was sworn never to reveal the dark secret: broke pop star. It seems stars do not necessarily make as much money as the industry machine would have us believe.

    • I can confirm this. The illusion surrounding celebrities is wafer thin. Up close and personal, they are quite empty vessels. But after the fact, it rather makes sense. The celebrities of the world are not superhuman. They are not smarter or more talented or better in any way than the average person. They just have coaching and representation.

      That said, Jennifer Connelly is a stone. cold. fox.

  • or is this an accidental repeat from the April fools day prank a few years ago with an attempt to widen slashdot's appeal by adding "omg ponies" signs and pink color scheme now we add celebrity gossip?
    • by Nadaka (224565)

      Why do you think that the My Little Pony franchise was resurrected a few short years later? Slashdot brought forth ponies into the modern era.

  • Seriously, this is not news. This is like some sort of tabloid shit. Keep this stupid crap off slashdot.
    • I'm pretty sure that technically it is in-fact news. Obviously not the kind that everyone is interested in.

      In any case CmdrTaco posted this particular FA, I would suspect he would know what does and doesn't belong on /.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Threni (635302)

        And since the terrible, terrible visual update to Slashdot they've lost the `news for nerds - stuff that matters` tag. And not before time; this story, like so many others here recently, is neither.

    • by hduff (570443)

      Seriously, this is not news.

      So we wait until Linux goes all Charlie Sheen?

      (Or Hans Reiser of you prefer a geek meme.)

    • This is like some sort of tabloid shit.

      What's a 'Tabloid'? Oh, is that the new marketing name for a tablet running Android?

  • So it's not close to being in Hollywood with the movie stars, but I can tell you if there's one guy out there who's so totally humble, Linus is it. He's a nice guy; it's great to see him get to do things like this from time to time.

    • by corbettw (214229)

      I can tell you if there's one guy out there who's so totally humble

      It's Hollywood, so yes, there's only one guy out there who's humble.

      • I can tell you if there's one guy out there who's so totally humble

        It's Hollywood, so yes, there's only one guy out there who's humble.

        Actually most of them are. I'm sorry to suck the fun out of this well-established generalization, but this reputation is something that scared me when I first started working on movies. Instead of working with egotistical prima donnas like I expected, instead I met a lot of kind people who were eager to help me out. Maybe it's just because they're nice people or maybe it's just because movie making only really works when people work as a team. Couldn't tell you. What I can tell you is that I've dealt wi

        • I have found that ego is usually inverse proportional to talent. It's those who are mostly inept who seem to have the biggest chip on their shoulders. While there is a lot of BSing in hollywood there is also a lot of talented professionals who only got to where they are through a lot of hard work and experience. Such a brutal thinning process of reputation/skill tends to weed out the egotistical assholes more than something like accounting where you just have to impress the HR person.

          It's such a small i

          • by boxwood (1742976)

            Yeah, the people who are nice get more work. Its pretty obvious when Directors are always casting the same actors in all their movies. How many Tim Burton Movies don't have Johnny Depp or Helena Bonham-Carter? How many Ridley Scott movies have Russel Crowe in them? On the other side, how many Steven Speilberg movies have Julia Roberts? Only one, because Speilberg Didn't get along well with Roberts.

            Yeah if you're a big name Actor you'll still get work even if you're an asshole, but there will be some big nam

        • by e4g4 (533831)

          I've dealt with a good deal less ego in this career than I did working at web startups back in the dot-com days.

          That's because successful actors don't have to wear the bridle of not actually having made any money yet...

          • I've dealt with a good deal less ego in this career than I did working at web startups back in the dot-com days.

            That's because successful actors don't have to wear the bridle of not actually having made any money yet...

            That's an odd response to what I said. I'm not Hollywood's biggest talent agent.

            • by e4g4 (533831)
              My point was that startups are, for the most part, unproven and unprofitable, so people working for them overcompensate by being a bit egotistical. I say this as someone who's been kicking around the "Silicon Alley" startup culture for a while; I've seen it a few times.
        • by IrquiM (471313)
          What? I thought everyone had a Charlie Sheen in them...?
  • "We interrupted David Spade chatting up Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis..."

    Too bad Linus was not familiar enough with B list movie stars to recognize Spade and slap him. I'll never get those hours back from Joe Dirt.

    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      If a butt-kicking is necessary, I assume Tove would be happy to provide it with her mad karate skillz.

    • by tehcyder (746570)

      "We interrupted David Spade chatting up Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis..."

      Too bad Linus was not familiar enough with B list movie stars to recognize Spade and slap him. I'll never get those hours back from Joe Dirt.

      What's the point of a man chatting up two lesbians?

  • One care bear is available for each person that actually cares
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Care_Bears [wikipedia.org]

  • Next thing you know he'll be in the tabloids rumored to have snorted blow off Lindsay Lohan's ass.
  • He is not the father of Linux, he is the father of the Linux Kernel. There's a difference. All of the utilities, shells, pretty much everything else was GNU. And they would have had a kernel first if Stallman didn't spend all of his time working on Emacs.
    • Re:Not the father. (Score:5, Informative)

      by icebraining (1313345) on Monday February 28, 2011 @07:33PM (#35342756) Homepage

      "Linux," by itself is the kernel. That's why Stallman makes the distinction between Linux and GNU/Linux. So he is in fact the father of Linux.

      • by VTI9600 (1143169)

        No, GNU-slash-Linux is not a distinction...it is a moniker he asks people to use because he rightfully wants the GNU Project to get the recognition it deserves. When people colloquially refer to "Linux", they are referring to a complete operating system (i.e. GNU-slash-Linux). The entire concept of a free-as-in-speech operating system was pioneered by Stallman. The GPL was created by Stallman. Linux (the kernel) would not have been free if the GPL hadn't come first. People (except the Debian folks) dro

        • by marsu_k (701360)

          People (except the Debian folks) drop the GNU/ because it doesn't roll off the tounge quite so well as just saying "Linux".

          "It doesn't roll off the tongue quite so well" is quite an understatement. I do realize the FSF stance on the issue (although, where do you draw the line - should my disrtibution be GNU/Linux/x.org/KDE?), but seeing "Revolution OS" was quite enlightening - people actually pronounce it as "GNU-slash-Linux", which is really, really retarded. Marketing has always been an issue with free so

      • by dbIII (701233)
        That is of course the word in the MIT staffroom when RMS was asked "how is Hurd going lately" which is why we had the stupid LiGnuX and GNU/Linux naming storms in a teacup. It's petty academic politics that escaped into the real world.
        Most of the twisted definition of an OS used in the GNU/Linux idea came from the definition of an OS the Judge threw out in the Microsoft vs Netscape case.
        If you are going to use the stupid "father" idea you are going to have to make RMS the father of every project that uses
      • by migla (1099771)

        Yup yup. For some time now, we've grown accustomed to sloppily calling the whole OS "Linux", and maybe we should let language evolve how it evolves and accept that the common usage is what defines it.

        It has led to the funny situation that we hear that Android is not *really* Linux (as in GNU/X11/Linux), while it technically does have the kernel underneath.

    • by MobyDisk (75490)

      And they would have had a kernel first if Stallman didn't spend all of his time working on Emacs.

      In his defense, Emacs is at least twice as powerful as most operating system kernels. :-)

    • by JamesP (688957)

      Yeah, he's going to implement GNU Hurd in Lisp as a module of Emacs

      oh wait...

  • Was I the only one geeky enough to be pleased at the sight of KDE 3.x on "Zuckerberg's" laptops in the movie?
    • No. Others are equally geeky.

  • by bugs2squash (1132591) on Monday February 28, 2011 @07:26PM (#35342682)

    I sit in my office (which used to be in the basement, now it's a room above the garage)

    I think he should get out of there now, before it moves even further

  • Not just movie stars? There, I said it.
  • by PPH (736903) on Monday February 28, 2011 @09:05PM (#35343512)

    Don't despair. I'm sure I saw Ballmer there.

    No, wait. That was Shrek. Never mind.

    • by Ocker3 (1232550)
      It's funny because none of us Windows people really care about Ballmer, except aboput when he's going to leave.
  • the Father of Linux, Linux Torvalds, and his wife Tove were among the beautiful people

    From the blog:

    Everybody seemed to take [us walking up to familiar looking people and asking them who they were] in good cheer. We interrupted David Spade chatting up Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis (that's what Tove says, I was oblivious - it's those famous geek social graces again. I told her I'm sure I'd have noticed Natalie Portman and that she can't possibly have been there, but whatever), and Tove pissed off Warren Beatty by asking his name not just once, but twice.

    So. Who is this, Linux Torvalds anyway?

    No, I mean, who is this Linux Torvalds anyway?

    • FACT: Torvalds started Linux

      FACT: Linux is named after its creator

      ERGO: Torvalds's first name is Linux

      The logic is unassailable.

You can do this in a number of ways. IBM chose to do all of them. Why do you find that funny? -- D. Taylor, Computer Science 350

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