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Embedded Linux 1-Second Cold Boot To QT 141

Posted by timothy
from the why-does-my-phone-need-2-minutes? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The blog post shows an embedded device cold booting Linux to a QT application all in just one second. This post also includes a link which describes what modifications were made to achieve this."
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Embedded Linux 1-Second Cold Boot To QT

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  • by FuckingNickName (1362625) on Thursday January 13, 2011 @06:57PM (#34870744) Journal

    ...booted in about 5 seconds, and that was to a general desktop.

    And my toy homebrew OS boots to a primitive UI in under 2 seconds after BIOS, and much of that is running interpreted bytecode.

    The fact is that a full BIOS + Linux / Windows system is a horrible fucking mess of bloat, but part of it is the price you pay finding and initialising all those millions of third party devices your old/embedded device isn't going to need to worry about.

    Still, as always, I believe any engineer's claim not before I get to test it myself.

  • Made my day (Score:5, Interesting)

    by LoRdTAW (99712) on Thursday January 13, 2011 @07:02PM (#34870856)

    Its good to see a fun tech article like this on /. I haven't seen any in a while (maybe its just me).

    I assume that during boot time, the Qt UI and low level hardware modules are loaded immediately. Then other modules and services can be loaded later on such as networking, video capture drivers and other lower priority services. I also assume the UI is not based on X but a Qt implementation that is directly drawing to the frame buffer.

    Lately I have been on a bit of an embedded systems kick playing around with PLC's and embedded micro controllers. This is a great article.

  • by mhotchin (791085) <{ten.nihctoh} {ta} {todhsals}> on Thursday January 13, 2011 @08:51PM (#34872426)
    Um. This capability has been around since FOREVER. I worked at MS 'beside' the group that created exactly such a tool, called BBT. This was ~2000.

    It was the most used, but not the only result of a tool suite called Vulcan. This would allow you to pull apart and re-assemble a binary, either for re-ordering (optimization) or to add instrumentation for other optimization projects (like the one I worked on).
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 13, 2011 @11:14PM (#34873620)

    Um. This capability has been around since FOREVER. I worked at MS 'beside' the group that created exactly such a tool, called BBT. This was ~2000.

    It was the most used, but not the only result of a tool suite called Vulcan. This would allow you to pull apart and re-assemble a binary, either for re-ordering (optimization) or to add instrumentation for other optimization projects (like the one I worked on).

    You deliberately seem to miss one really important point.

    These guys do not have to pull apart binaries they can mod them from source if they feel like it. You have let the cat out of the bag and admitted that Microsoft uses disassemble technique on other peoples binaries all the time. No wonder it was so easy for you guys to clone closed functions in IBM's Lotus Suite and com SQL framework, then pretend that you did not know what was going on when all of a sudden their binaries were slower and less reliable than yours!

    So you guys have been doing what you say others have no business do to your software FOREVER. Face it... considering the fact that embedded Linux runs most TVs, BD players and other really popular devices on the market today, you are just mouthing a party line and not making a real valid argument why MS is losing out in the embedded products market!

"There is nothing new under the sun, but there are lots of old things we don't know yet." -Ambrose Bierce

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