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Ubuntu 10.10 Release Candidate Launched 172

Posted by Soulskill
from the almost-to-the-finish-line dept.
tuXx writes "On Thursday, Canonical rolled out the official release candidate of its upcoming Ubuntu OS version 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat. The release announcement has a feature list, and a review of the RC is up at ITWorld. It's available for download at the Ubuntu wiki site. If all goes well, the stable release is planned for Oct. 10th."
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Ubuntu 10.10 Release Candidate Launched

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  • 10.10 (Score:3, Funny)

    by Shikaku (1129753) on Friday October 01, 2010 @08:10PM (#33766768)

    On 10/10/10!

    Whoo!

  • Why is this story marked brown while every other are the regular gray?

  • A link... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Idbar (1034346) on Friday October 01, 2010 @08:16PM (#33766812)
    to the article in a single page here [itworld.com]
  • Server management (Score:5, Interesting)

    by rantomaniac (1876228) on Friday October 01, 2010 @08:17PM (#33766824)

    Does this version clean up the mess that is their init system? Some init scripts were sysv, some were upstart-native in 10.04, and there was no commandline utility that made sense of it all.
    I ran into that problem in the *server edition*, what is more central to a server installation than managing services?

    • by mutube (981006) on Saturday October 02, 2010 @09:48AM (#33769828) Homepage

      What is more central to a server installation than managing services?

      A beard?

    • by multiplexo (27356)
      Probably not. Upstart is a fucking disaster, and the way it was rolled out, with some services being converted to upstart scripts and others still retaining the traditional /etc/init.d/ scripts made it even worse. I'd be more impressed with Ubuntu if they'd stop fucking with their desktop, which is still a fugly, barely functional piece of shit compared to Windows 7 and MacOS and fix things like the broken software RAID configuration on Lucid installs, or upgrading rsyslog to a newer version than 4.2. or in
  • This feature has stirred up lots of debate [pcworld.com]. With the uncertainty of XMarks [slashdot.org] they may be trying to capitalize on the panic.
    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      That has been going on since 2009, are you trying to just drive traffic to that site?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Is Pulseaudio still required? I really got fed up in Ubuntu 9.10 when they made the volume control stack Dependant on it. If you removed PA, you would get a "waiting for sound system to respond" message when trying to select an audio device... and your graphical volume control would break. There is a third-party PPA to fix it, but that is a pain.

    I'm also not happy about the integration of a system to purchase proprietary software. Proprietary vendors have no respect for me or my property, and I don't want t

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by tuppe666 (904118)
      The alternative is Alsa/Pulseaudio combination continues to improve...and has always worked for me. If there is a major annoyance, and its one that many people have, previous updates often mute the volume. What I have also found is that alsa on my Revo through HDMI on this update muted an a switch that wasn't available through a GUI. Although compared to sound on Windows Pulseaudio is a godsend, and a step in the right direction.

      Given the option to buy commercial software is an excellent idea. You don't h

    • by siride (974284) on Saturday October 02, 2010 @12:29AM (#33768170)
      Do you trust open-source software? Have you actually looked at the code to make sure that it isn't doing anything sneaky? You know that people can analyze the code and behavior of proprietary software as well, albeit with a little bit more difficulty. That's how all those exploits for Windows came about.
    • A quick fix to put the buttons back on the right top corner : change desktop themes, I think my personal favourite "Clear Looks" is still available,
      but almost any other theme that's not the default has the buttons on the right.

      There is also a hack in the config scripts, but I'd have to dig for it ...

  • It's been all over the forums for months that they broke it in 10. Lots of 'fixes' and lots more people who the fixes don't work for. It's kept me on 9 the whole time.
  • Too quickly (Score:2, Interesting)

    by sea4ever (1628181)
    In my opinion they release new versions too quickly. I know there are a lot of differences between versions, but what I'd like is if they slowed it down by a bit.
    That way, they could release each new version as a dramatically different thing than the previous ones. At this rate, Ubuntu 11.x will be roughly the same as Ubuntu 9.x
    I don't think it should be like that. Also, someone up-comments (I figure that's how I refer to someone above me in the list) pointed out the horrible mess that the init scripts ar
    • Re:Too quickly (Score:5, Interesting)

      by shutdown -p now (807394) on Friday October 01, 2010 @10:13PM (#33767554) Journal

      If you are keen on that kind of thing, you can always just pretend that a new version is released every three years in April, and the rest of them in between are kinda betas.

      • Re: (Score:2, Redundant)

        You could stick with LTS [ubuntu.com].

      • by zoward (188110)

        If you are keen on that kind of thing, you can always just pretend that a new version is released every three years in April, and the rest of them in between are kinda betas.

        While this seems like an option, they still have to rush a Long Term Support (LTS) release out the door six months after the previous release, just like the "in-between" releases. I've been a happy Ubuntu user since Warty (4.10 - 10/2004), and haven't found the LTS'es any more stable than the other releases.

        The only possible upside to this argument is that it may become more stable later in its support life; but I suspect the Ubuntu community (including Canonical) is more preoccupied with getting the next

        • by Darundal (891860)
          I'll have to disagree with you there. 6.06, Dapper Drake, the original LTS release (that they took 3 extra months on) was superb in every way, and (at least for me) an improvement over the previous release in stability and features. Then the next release was rushed out the door after three whole months of development, and is the one release I ever wholly passed up. The Latest, Greates, and Most Shiny is what Ubuntu is about. It was meant to be a more current version than w/e Debian's current release is, wh
      • I tried that.

        Turns out there's a helluva difference between "stability" and "using 2 year old obsolete versions of everything."

        I still remember the last round of Gaim vs Yahoo awhile back (IM service breaks 3rd party client->client updated->pause->repeat) when I was on 8.04. I wonder if it even works to this day (I just said "bugger it" and installed an updated version from source).

      • Shit, how about once every 9 months? That way when they decide to deploy an entirely new init system they might have some more time for integration and bugsquashing, and they could package PulseAudio properly for release like they initially didn't, or do a decent job packaging KDE4.

        Or at least they could shove that extra time between the Beta and RC and spend a lot more time squashing bugs. After about 8.10 or so the bugginess of each release has felt like kind of a constant, and it's higher than it should
    • Re:Too quickly (Score:4, Interesting)

      by coerciblegerm (1829798) on Friday October 01, 2010 @11:23PM (#33767860)

      In my opinion they release new versions too quickly. I know there are a lot of differences between versions, but what I'd like is if they slowed it down by a bit. That way, they could release each new version as a dramatically different thing than the previous ones. At this rate, Ubuntu 11.x will be roughly the same as Ubuntu 9.x I don't think it should be like that. Also, someone up-comments (I figure that's how I refer to someone above me in the list) pointed out the horrible mess that the init scripts are. This is absolutely true. Someone find them and mod them up, please.

      I completely agree. I've recently made the decision to go upstream and install Debian (testing) on my home system instead of upgrading to 10.10; the last three releases of Ubuntu have proven to be a complete nightmare to upgrade (for me, at least) without a clean install. I rather like the idea of (at least theoretically) never having to re-install my operating system and manually building "deprecated" programs that I prefer to use due to a major distribution upgrade.

      • by rubycodez (864176)

        all Ubuntu users might be doing that when the funding for Ubuntu runs out.

      • by c (8461)

        I've been continuously tracking Debian testing for one of me development systems for something like five, maybe six years now; if you think a Ubuntu upgrade once per year is messy, you might want to rethink this approach. testing is where you see major toolchain updates (i.e. gcc, perl, python, etc), system service changes, and oddball stuff like hda => sda (years ago, but it left a lot of unbootable boxes behind). Any "apt-get update" can bring a new surprise...

      • by Kjella (173770)

        Depends on what you value I guess... I did use to track Debian testing once, though we're talking maybe 2003-2007 here. It broke stuff from time to time, and the breaking was random. Any update could break something at any time, though of course since less was upgraded at once it rarely hit "nightmare" levels. And testing slowed down *massively* around releases, so expect some bi-annual freeze periods.

        I'm not going to pretend everything is working in Ubuntu releases. But at least I get to pick the time and

  • Does anyone know if the OOo quick-starter prevents shutdown like it did with Ubuntu 10.04?

    And have they fixed the lesser issue of the quick-starter icon having a white background (versus the default tray colour of black/dark-grey)?
  • Mark, if you are reading, please let 11.04 be called narcoleptic newt, ...

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by cbhacking (979169)

      Wait... you want a computer that just randomly enters sleep mode on you?

      • All users want that. Isn't that why windoze has it as a default?

        And while its borrowing some good design decisions, just get the computer to restart itself whenever updates are auto-applied. Don't worry about processes that may be running, the admin will probably notice on Monday morning.
  • Really week review (Score:5, Interesting)

    by leamanc (961376) on Saturday October 02, 2010 @01:26AM (#33768414) Homepage Journal
    The linked review is pretty damn weak. It mostly goes over the installed software without actually talking much about what it all does and how it all works together. And the author "doesn't understand" why MP3 codecs or Flash Player are not installed by default, even though they are a click away when you need them. I would expect an IT professional to understand the licensing issues here, and how they come in to play when shipping a FLOSS distro. Ubuntu handles it quite elegantly, IMO, but to do what he wants would violate some laws (stupid, bad laws, but laws nonetheless).
  • by Yuioup (452151) on Saturday October 02, 2010 @04:13AM (#33768924)

    I installed the Netbook Remix with the Unity UI on my Acer Aspire One ZG5 and I *hated* it. Slow, unclear, and very buggy. And this was the last beta. I don't understand the concept of combining the start menu with an off-line and on-line search function in one action. That made launching programs a tedious and frustrating experience. I don't think that this is a direction that Canonical should take at all.

    Can anybody explain the appeal of Unity to me?

    • My eeepc701 has the smallest screen around and the stock gnome desktop is fine for me.

    • by Rogerborg (306625)

      Urgh, thanks for the warning. The first thing I did after installing Netbook Remix 10.04 on an 10.1" EEE PC was to strip the Netbook crud off of it. I was minded to give Unity a try, but more out of masochism than any real hope that Canonical had produced a UI that actually made sense on a modern netbook.

      To be honest, this constant swapping and changing of UIs and development focus smacks rather of desperation from Canonical. It's good to try new things, but it doesn't seem like they really have any cle

      • So you installed the netbook remix because you didn't want netbook crud? I'm failing to see your logic here... Why not use the persistent option from a live USB stick?

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          That's not practical on a portable. Unless you have a super-fast SD card, booting from your memory card reader is a fail, too. Also the Ubuntu install is not very smart, obviously Ubuntu has the technology to detect if you are using a USB stick or similar because they use it to make usb installers, but they don't detect this during install and disable readahead or anything like that.

          Zenity is poop, so when I install on a netbook (like my EEE 701) I just install ubuntu-minimal and then install the apps I wan

  • by rnsimoes (1886500) on Saturday October 02, 2010 @06:58AM (#33769378)
    I am glad Ubuntu keeps shipping new versions at a regular pace but I would advise to wait a few weeks before upgrading. It is cautious to let others try it first and detect any problems. In any case, I must say that the last versions of Ubuntu I tried worked pretty well out of the box.

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