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Operating Systems Ubuntu Linux

Next Ubuntu Linux To Be a Maverick 319

Posted by Soulskill
from the a-lock-for-the-primaries dept.
VincenzoRomano writes "While the latest version of Ubuntu is still smoking hot, the Ubuntu development community is already working on the next step. Both the wiki and the bug tracking system at Launchpad have already been set up for Maverick Meerkat, which will be version number 10.10. This confirms the usual naming and numbering schema and the fact that the final release should be due in October. This next version, which obviously won't be Long Term Support (LTS), should sport a lighter and faster environment with GNOME 3.0, a.k.a. GNOME Shell, among the main advances. Everything has been explained by Mr. Shuttleworth in his own blog since the beginning of April. The first alpha release is not due earlier than the end of June, so maybe it'd be better to take advantage of the Lucid Lynx while the technical overview of the Meerkat starts getting more details."
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Next Ubuntu Linux To Be a Maverick

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  • Great.... (Score:5, Funny)

    by mangu (126918) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:20PM (#32075054)

    Let's hope it comes with the 302 engine [wikipedia.org]

  • by Kelson (129150) * on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:20PM (#32075056) Homepage Journal

    I see that they're aiming for October 28. You'd think someone would have tried to aim the "Perfect 10" for a 10/10/10 release date.

  • by Em Emalb (452530) <ememalb AT gmail DOT com> on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:21PM (#32075066) Homepage Journal

    I'm waiting for Naughty Nautilus myself.

  • Sounds good! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Scholasticus (567646) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:26PM (#32075104) Journal
    I know, I know, "'Ubuntu' is an African word meaning 'I'm too stupid for Slackware'" ... I don't use it myself (I use another distribution, not going to plug it here), but I've installed it for a number of friends and family members, and just installed Lynx for my brother, because: 1) Ease of install/configuration 2) Pretty easy transition from Windows 3) Lots of software in the repos And some other reasons. LL is pretty sweet, so I think Shuttleworth & Co. are on the right track in many, if not all, ways. So I think the announcement is pretty exciting. Gnome 3 looks very promising ... so next June' Maverick Meerkat could be pretty interesting.
    • And then there is Lubuntu. The "just works. no complexity" flavour of Ubuntu.

      • Re:Sounds good! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by MonsterTrimble (1205334) <monstertrimble&hotmail,com> on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:35PM (#32075924)

        I use Lubuntu 10.04 & PPA repos (testing) on my 5 year old laptop. I like it in general - responsive, clean, simple. However, it does not 'Just Work'. To wit:

        1) Lack of meaningful network tools - Pyneighborhood is the worst solution I've ever seen to this. WiCD & network manager like to fight it out over who starts which day. I STILL can't browse my LAN.
        2) Plymouth - this one has settled down but it was a pure nightmare when I first installed it. I ended up removing GDM entirely to stop the hanging on startup.

        I applaud the Lubuntu team and the complaints above are only my observations - I am looking forward to future releases and the maturing of Lubuntu as a distribution. As a probable future refugee from Kubuntu, I beg to not become part of the system and stay close to LXDE. Gnome is the king, the rest are pawns.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by BikeHelmet (1437881)

          The thing about Ubuntu and its sister distros is... don't be an early adopter.

          Whenever a new release comes out, it's packed with hundreds of strange bugs. The forums get flooded by people with all sorts of issues. Then within a few months, 95% of them are fixed.

          The best time to hop on 10.04 will be 2 months from now. Ubuntu is firm about their 6 month releases, but it'd really work better if they went with 8 months. Do a feature freeze after 4, then spend 4 getting it rock solid stable, and doing proper reg

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Tubal-Cain (1289912)

      ...just installed Lynx for my brother, because:

      1. Ease of install/configuration
      2. Pretty easy transition from Windows
      3. Lots of software in the repos

      I agree with your first two points, but since does a web browser need repos?

    • by Abcd1234 (188840) on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:48PM (#32076104) Homepage

      I know, I know, "'Ubuntu' is an African word meaning 'I'm too stupid for Slackware'"

      Funny, I thought it was African for "I used Slackware years ago, but now I have better things to do with my time"...

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by DirePickle (796986)
        It's funny--I used to use Slack back in the day and have been using Ubuntu for the past couple of years, but I'm seriously considering going back to Slackware again. When everything works out of the box Ubuntu is great, but if anything is broken it seems to actively try to inhibit you from fixing the problem.
    • After trying to install LL from a CD, I was a bit disappointed because (like in the previous releases) it couldn't work with wireless card (don't remember the brand; is in a Vostro 1520 more than a year old), needing some proprietary driver (also provided by Ubuntu)... which in turn required an Internet connection for downloading (without an UTP cable and some port, it's a catch-22.)

      Those proprietary drivers should be included in the images (just another necessary evil.)

      Besides, kudos for the Ubuntu people.

  • by mxh83 (1607017) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:27PM (#32075112)

    The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.. No real usability improvements.

    • by FictionPimp (712802) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:30PM (#32075154) Homepage
      I go from LTS to LTS. But those incrmental upgrades are great. It gives the bleeding edge people something to do, and it let's me keep tabs on what will show up in the next LTS.
    • by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:31PM (#32075156)

      The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO.

      But it gets current code out there and in use.

      Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.

      That's where the LTS releases come in. If you don't want to upgrade, you don't have to. For years.

      In the meantime, the other people are hammering on the short-release cycle code.

      • by IANAAC (692242) on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:29PM (#32075854)

        That's where the LTS releases come in. If you don't want to upgrade, you don't have to. For years.

        The problem with this is that many good applications won't support the release for the same amount of time.

        Boxee is an excellent example, at least for the last Ubuntu LTS release. They dropped support for it as soon as the next Ubuntu release came out - not an LTS release.

      • I used to use Blender a lot as I liked to do 3D stuff for fun, but not enough to soak $1k every year or two into Lightwave. Well, everytime it seemed like I'd download the latest and greatest, everything changed. Animations had been spending years on suddenly had to be redone because of major changes to the particles engine, the GUI layout would change and by the time I learned where the buttons had moved or what all the new buttons did it would be time for an upgrade. I finally gave up and loaded my anc

      • The problem with that is that often users will want to upgrade some things but not other things. For example people might not be interested in the new themes, or switch from HAL to DeviceKit, or the new kernel, or major desktop environment changes that change UI all over the place and break binary compatibility, but they might want to upgrade Firefox 2 to 3 or being able to use that new app which was released last week.

      • by bcrowell (177657) on Monday May 03, 2010 @05:53PM (#32078752) Homepage

        That's where the LTS releases come in. If you don't want to upgrade, you don't have to. For years.

        For me, the big problem with that is that I can't update my apps without updating the OS as well. This is just the way debian/ubuntu is designed. With jaunty and karmic, I had to upgrade in order to get bug fixes in my apps, but then I got new bugs in the OS.

        If I'd still been running Hardy until last month, then I would have been running some ancient, buggy version of Inkscape, for instance. On the other hand, by upgrading I got sound completely broken by pulseaudio.

        What OS guys don't seem to understand is that end users don't really care about the OS-level features that seem so exciting to an OS guy. We just want the OS to work so that we can run apps.

    • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:36PM (#32075220) Homepage

      The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often

      If you don't want to upgrade every six months then don't do it.

      Just let me know if you have any other really tough problems that you need my help with.

    • by Kjella (173770)

      Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often

      Why then does reality disagree with you? Or is there someone holding a gun to their head forcing them to use Ubuntu or to use the six month releases over the LTS ones?

    • by MBGMorden (803437) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:54PM (#32075454)

      From release to release? Yeah, the improvements tend to be incremental so you're not going to see anything Earth-shattering. That's just the "frog boiling in the pot" effect though. Compare Ubuntu today with Ubuntu from 3 years ago, and you'll notice HUGE usability improvements. Despite having been a Linux user in a "dual boot and learn it but still spend most of your time in Windows" fashion since 1997, Ubuntu is the first distribution that fully converted me. I'm still on Windows at work, but at home? It's been 3 or 4 months since I've touched Windows. And for the first time, I really haven't felt much of a need to.

    • by Seth Kriticos (1227934) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:55PM (#32075462)

      The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.. No real usability improvements.

      You aren't into OSS development much, are you?

      See, as some others pointed out, the long term support releases are there for the more conservative / more stable environments. You can upgrade every 2 or 3 years and have your peace.

      Some of us are actually curious and like to see new stuff at times. We like new releases. We play with them and see how they do or break, then we post bug reports and stuff. We check out the regular releases and are happy with that.

      One important thing the Linux community realized was, that building something for two years in your basement and then trying to release something perfect will most probably end in havoc.

      On the other hand, releasing often, getting feedback, keeping in touch with users is much more effective.

      Another good example for this is the Linux kernel: an new version is released every 3 months. Works great, is stable and everyone can calculate on when to integrate. Also developers don't have to wait ages for the merge window when they can add their own code.

      ps. And there are nice changes in a lot of places, though the focus of this long time release was obviously more on the stability part and a lot of people on the previous LTS release were awaiting this one eagerly.

    • Nonsense; "user visible" changes are very different for different people when it's a distro consisting of thousands of packages. Ubuntu's system is also far better than "release never", which was the seeming mantra of Debian stable for many years, and apparently RHEL's entire business model.

      For my part, I like having reasonably vetted releases which bring incremental improvements. It's a happy medium between (e.g.) surfing Debian unstable just to get some new feature in one oft-used package and "stable" v

    • by migla (1099771)

      But it's not just "the same old crap with a different color". Even if we'd agree that whatever ubuntu develops itself is not much every half year, all the upstream packages will have newer versions.

    • I update Debian Sid weekly.

      apt-get update.
      apt-get upgrade.

      Tada!

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Actually I agree with this.. I was going to post asking what goodness exists even in 10.04.. Facebook this cloud that... Personally I don't CARE. What INTERNAL things are better?
  • Awww... (Score:4, Funny)

    by Kirin Fenrir (1001780) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:27PM (#32075122)
    They didn't accept my name, "Menstruating Mongoose". :(
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Crayon Kid (700279)

      It's because of "mongoose". Shuttleworth was bitten by one as a child and has it in for them. Now, had you proposed "Menstruating Meerkat" on the other hand...

    • It's probably because they favor African animals. Change it to an African animal and they'll be sure to accept it.
    • The negative associations to anything "maverick" are so overwhelming that I have to question the business sense of who has opted for it. Yes, please give me anything else, including Menstruating Mongoose.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:28PM (#32075130)

    I've used Ubuntu as my primary desktop OS since 8.10, and I can say without reservation that 10.04 is the worst of the bunch. Why? They broke everything! And I'm not just talking about button placement. I fixed that in the first 10 minutes. The reason why I'm abandoning Ubuntu are simple: they dropped the quality ball on this release.

    First I noticed that VirtualBox doesn't let you use bridged network unless you manually install some kernel drivers. Googling found that people had this problem for at least 3 months, and they still didn't fix it in the release. Second, upgrading uninstalled my Java plugin for Firefox, so I had to manually add the symlink. Third (and by far the worst), my 6GB machine became non-responsive in the first 24 hours of uptime -- on the same machine that typically had months of uptime on 8.10 through 9.10 (I only rebooted for security patches that required a reboot).

    In conclusion: if they don't fix these problems in the next two weeks, I'll abandon Ubuntu for another distribution, and I'll never consider using Ubuntu again.

    • +1 (if I had the modpoints)! It seems that Canonical is definitely favoruing eye candy and new features in spite of under-the-hood brokenness. It's really sad to see *any* distribution of Linux become like Windows. Really sad. :( Of course, there is always Debian to fall back on :)

    • by tom17 (659054) on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:11PM (#32075648) Homepage
      I'm in a similar boat. I did the upgrade over the weekend from 9.10. When I went from 9.04 to 9.10 I was mostly pleased, except a few irritating bugs and the fast user switch applet was removed - this previously made wife-friendly usage in the living room a breeze. I was all excited to get to 10.04 as it was returning. This would be Ubuntu's last chance to keep me.

      Yes it returned (in a less intuitive place, the menu with your name is now all 'communication' based. The fast switching is located under the *power* icon... huh?)
      I have already had a system freeze while switching user.

      Sun Java was booted and now isn't even in the repositories. "OpenJDK is good enough for most people". I will try it for a while but I hope it is up to scratch for Java EE 6 development (doubt that). Now I have to jump through the proverbial hoops.

      The whole Indicator applet/Indicator applet session/Notification Area/Volume control/Battery meter/Network icon mess is a joke. - The combinations of icons that you are allowed ends up with far less efficient usage of space in some circumstances. The reason they made the changes? To increase efficiency of space used.

      I know some of these are minor irritations in reality, but it's mucking about with stuff like this, causing frustration with the users, that pisses me off. I know, I will get used to it.. *sigh*.

      So it's time for a switch. Is Fedora Core wife-friendly? She is begging for Win7 so I may just partition it with FC/Win7 & Hackintosh - Maybe this is the OS that will lure me, cos linux (Well, Ubuntu) only seems to be going backwards.

      Tom...
    • by Vectormatic (1759674) on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:12PM (#32075656)

      Ever since ubuntu became usable without command line hacking (somewhere in 2007 by my account), they started fucking up other parts. They started adding in new flashy shit that no-one really needs, and forgetting about actually getting a STABLE distro out there. In 9.10 everything pretty much works on my desktop (wish i could say the same for my laptops, which fuck up on every release), except for the piece of misconfigured shit that is pulseaudio. If i try to play certain DVDs in vlc, all sound will play, except for the fricking voice tracks.. it takes endless fucking about to get this to work. And every single release the last few years has had these type of issues on nearly all of my systems. nearly everything works, but they never forget to royally screw at least one thing up, preventing themselves from becoming a true user friendly distro.

      10.04 will NOT make it onto my main systems for day to day use, if i ever find the need to upgrade from my current ubuntu settups, then fedora is first on my list.

      • by blincoln (592401)

        They started adding in new flashy shit that no-one really needs, and forgetting about actually getting a STABLE distro out there.

        Kubuntu 10.04 is much more responsive on my laptop than the last release. Unfortunately, whereas the last release was rock-solid stable on that laptop (once I manually edited xorg.conf to disable some arcane feature whose use was causing the bottom half of the display to be garbage), this new release is pretty sketchy. So far I've discovered that when recording audio in Audacity,

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by flabordec (984984)
      No!! Please!! Don't!!! Continue using their free software, please!!
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by moosesocks (264553)

      I've used Ubuntu as my primary desktop OS since 8.10, and I can say without reservation that [MOST RECENT VERSION] is the worst of the bunch. Why? They broke everything!

      Seems like we hear this with every Ubuntu release... especially in the immediate days following the release. Ubuntu seems to jump the gun with releases.

      I don't necessarily take the view that quality's slipped -- the OS as a whole has markedly improved. However, they might want to do a bit more QA before pushing out releases.

      Also, isn't the "I'll never consider X again" reaction a bit impulsive?

      (PS. Did you install VirtualBox from repositories? The packages should have a DKMS trigger that fires whenever

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by escay (923320)

        Seems like we hear this with every Ubuntu release...

        that's probably because only the ones with problems after an upgrade speak up to air their grievances. the ones for which the upgrade went smoothly (i'm one of them, i upgraded with the beta in fact) are invisible because they don't have much to say. i'd give more weight to a percentage number of users who have had upgrade issues.

        and i agree with you, GP ditching the distro entirely does sound like a knee-jerk reaction - although i realize the button placement issue did cause much heartburn in the commun

    • On the other hand... (Score:3, Interesting)

      by IANAAC (692242)
      They fixed some things too.

      Most notably in my case, was the use of an external monitor at a different resolution than my netbook.

      That was horribly broken in 9.04.

      As for uptime, I've only had mine running a couple days on and old Eee 701 (albeit with 2G memory), but it's been solid, so far.

    • by timeOday (582209)
      Dang, have your high expectations come from using any distro other than previous versions of Ubuntu itself? The ONLY distro I've ever used that didn't get wadded up in dependency problems now and then was probably Debian Stable, and that always ends badly when I lose the discipline to stick with the ancient packages and start mixing in new packages that inevitably poison the system. Same for RHEL.

      I can't even run emacs on my gentoo system anymore ("emacs: error while loading shared libraries: libXm.so.

    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Monday May 03, 2010 @03:33PM (#32076684) Homepage Journal

      Interestingly, 10.04 is the first release in a couple of years that has worked without a hitch for me. I installed it on a whim, hoping that it might include a driver with hardware-accelerated 3D for my RV730 video card. I was pleasantly surprised that not only does it include that driver, everything I have tried has actually _worked_, and the experience is a marked improvement over what I was running before.

      The only issue I ran into is that GDM would not read my ~/.xsession [launchpad.net], but it's not entirely clear if that is a bug or a design choice, and, regardless, there is a fix for it.

      For the rest, it's stable, it's fast, it's beautiful, and it's even an LTS release. It's been a while since I've experienced that from Ubuntu, but they seem to have gotten everything I care about right this time.

      Keeping in mind your experience, I am curious as to how people in general fare with this release. I share your observation that Ubuntu has been caring more about new features than quality, and I was hoping that they had found their way back to putting together top quality releases. I would really like to know what the trend is, qualitywise.

      • by HiThere (15173)

        Well, I pulled a CD of the last RC, and couldn't even boot it. There wasn't any way to report the problem, as I've got no real idea what the issue was. I'm hoping that if I wait a week or two and pull another CD everything will be fixed, but I don't know how to tell.

        (It might be that "use nomodeset while booting" problem, but if the CD won't boot into a live system, I don't think I'll trust it on my system. Not even if there *is* a hack that would let me slip past the barrier.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      The problem is that Ubuntu's bug tracker is a black hole. Bugs don't even get triaged on a regular basis, let along fixed.

      If you look on the forums, bugs are fairly quickly identified and fixed. Often problems and solutions make it into the bug tracker; however, that's where the pipeline ends. Fixes almost never get checked into mainline.

      Ubuntu is still the best distro in my humble opinion, because of the wide variety of up to date software available for it. However, each release gets worse in terms of qual

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by greg1104 (461138)

        Often problems and solutions make it into the bug tracker; however, that's where the pipeline ends. Fixes almost never get checked into mainline.

        And in the three years I've been tracking Ubuntu development and its related bugs, I have never seen a fix for an issue I was running into backported to a LTS version. Far as I can tell, there's little beyond security fixes actually backported. This is why all my server deployments remain on RedHat/CentOS, where the bugs I run into are aggressively backported, not just the "fixed in next release" I see even on resolved ubuntu issues.

  • Will it be appearing on http://www.comparethemeerkat.com/ [comparethemeerkat.com] ?
  • Majestik Moose (Score:3, Informative)

    by mikemsd (225775) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:31PM (#32075164)

    I was really hoping for Majestik Moose. Seemed like the obvious choice to me.

    • I went against my earlier decision to wait a few weeks after the official release, and upgraded the night 10.04 came out. For the first time since I'm using Ubuntu from 7.04, nothing broke! I mean - network, virtual box, mail everything still worked. My only problem was getting use to the placement of the control box on the left instead of on the right. In terms of speed, I haven't seen any visible improvement in startup, but shutdown occurs in way less time than 9.10. This is the best Ubuntu yet!
    • by spazdor (902907)

      Moose and Maverick?
      WHAT could they be trying to tell us.

  • by Locke2005 (849178) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:38PM (#32075252)
    I thought for sure they were going to name it "Masturbating Monkey"!
  • by Locke2005 (849178) on Monday May 03, 2010 @01:51PM (#32075396)
    In defiance of spelling nazis everywhere, I propose the next release be named "kneeling gnu".
  • Sorry, I'm just an ex-Ubuntu fanboi. 10.04 changes, again, Ubuntu's focus on the desktop. I need more stability than whiz-bang features that aren't-so-mature-yet. I use Ubuntu for LTSP networks for many people, and cleaning up all of this "Ubuntu One / Social Networking / ever-changing-logout-shutdown dialog / notification panel / network-damager / blah blah blah" type of newly pushed feature stuff each and every release is tiring. I 3 Debian stable+backports for mission-critical LTSP desktops! They don't c

    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166)

      Actually, I'd rather mod you up than down. I concur with your observations, even if your presentation could be improved a bit. Alas, my mod points disappeared just before I found a post I felt like modding ...

    • by rrohbeck (944847)

      Try the Alternate installer. No flashy stuff, Debian base plus some Canonical improvements, and then you can add what you like.

  • No, thanks, I'd rather wait for 11.04.

  • What happens after Zealous Zebra ?
    • What happens after Zealous Zebra ?

      That was my thought as well. At "M" they are half way through the alphabet.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by pmontra (738736)
      You start with AA AA, as in Adventurous Amazing Awesome Apes.
    • by grikdog (697841)
      Atavistic Aardvark, of course. I'll probably break down and run Windows 7, though, just to reconnect with those apps that don't work on Mac, iPiddle, or Wine. Also known as the real reason you bought a computer. That said, yes, at the moment my wife and I run Jaunty Jackalope, our daughter runs Karmic Koala, and we all share a good-sized Smartdisk CrossFire and a simple manual backup procedure, viz., cp -auv /home ./media/CrossFire/. so we don't have to lintpick our way through a tar.bz2 to find Thing Ne
  • How is it that every single thing that happens at Ubuntu becomes a story on /. ? A new name is prime for a press release or an announcement on their site. It is a waste of bandwidth on /. . Some of the stuff that gets posted here goes beyond minutia and straight to trivial.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      How is it that every single thing that happens at Ubuntu becomes a story on /. ? A new name is prime for a press release or an announcement on their site. It is a waste of bandwidth on /. . Some of the stuff that gets posted here goes beyond minutia and straight to trivial.

      Yeah, that's ridiculous! Slashdot would never carry a story like that about Windows, or OSX? Oh wait, except, it has every time there's been a new release.

    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166)

      I agree with you. There are a lot of things that get posted to /. that I don't consider worth my time. And there are a lot of Ubuntu stories. On the other hand, one person's "not worth my time" is another person's "wow, interesting!". I guess with a lot of Ubuntu users out there, everything Ubuntu does _is_ actually interesting to a large part of the /. readership - and considering the number of comments on this story, the latter part certainly does seem to be true.

      So I guess the best thing you can do when

  • by Beelzebud (1361137) on Monday May 03, 2010 @02:24PM (#32075788)
    The Slashdot Trolls all agree; Ubuntu is the worst OS ever made, and only caters to retards!

    Which means it actually may be getting close to the year of the Linux Desktop. After all, it's actually becoming usable by "morons", a.k.a. people that have a life.
    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166)

      ``Which means it actually may be getting close to the year of the Linux Desktop. After all, it's actually becoming usable by "morons", a.k.a. people that have a life.''

      That, actually, is why I use Debian and Ubuntu. Several years ago now, I gave up on operating systems that required me to perform a lot of maintenance or care a lot about libraries, bleeding edge, performance, and disk space, and got something that Just Works. Debian did that for me, and then Ubuntu, and although especially Ubuntu has stained

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Pengo (28814)

      Haha :) +1

      I've been using Linux since the early days, and was on the linux desktop back when KDE was 1.x , I've long since abandoned Linux on the desktop since OS X has come out and been strong. (I'm a linux-server junkie, but no chance for using it with my desktop) I just don't have time to deal with all the crap-software and second rate desktop environment. Shitty hardware support, terrible video drivers. (I use dual 30inch monitors on a modern NVidia gfx card). The drama list goes on and on.

      I was p

  • It's important to say to the impatient among us that the first alpha release is not due earlier than the end of June,

    Actually, the release schedule page [ubuntu.com] has the first alpha release on June 3. The second alpha is end of June (actually July 1st.)

  • ...will it be “slow” and outdated, with a high risk of dying before the next release, and then in a quick move be replaced by the unstable and weird “Pathogenic Palin“? ;)

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