Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Operating Systems Ubuntu Linux

Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 2 vs. Early Fedora 13 Benchmarks 157

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the flavor-of-the-moment dept.
Given that early benchmarks of the Lucid Lynx were less than encouraging, Phoronix decided to take the latest alpha out for a spin and has set it side-by-side with an early look at Fedora 13. "Overall, there are both positive and negative performance changes for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Alpha 2 in relation to Ubuntu 9.10. Most of the negative regressions are attributed to the EXT4 file-system losing some of its performance charm. With using a pre-alpha snapshot of Fedora 13 and the benchmark results just being provided for reference purposes, we will hold off on looking into greater detail at this next Red Hat Linux update until it matures."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 2 vs. Early Fedora 13 Benchmarks

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward
    beta vs beta! Is anyone expecting valid results.?
    • by daremonai (859175) on Friday January 15, 2010 @05:48PM (#30785194)
      Don't worry; it's actually alpha (Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Alpha 2) vs. pre-alpha (2010-01-13 Rawhide nightly build). Much better.
  • by mrmeval (662166) <mrmeval@NospAm.gmail.com> on Friday January 15, 2010 @05:45PM (#30785154) Journal

    Catering to niche users at the expense of the majority.
    Removing functionality from X. Deleting the ability to restore a feature.
    Making it damn near impossible to troubleshoot X crashes.
    Ppppppp-p p p ulseaudio

    I'm not much enthused by Ubuntu anymore.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It's all worked perfectly for me on the three computers I've tried it on, PulseAudio included. The ability to move audio from one output device to another is awesome - Windows certainly can't do it!

      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 15, 2010 @06:00PM (#30785304)

        Shut up! It is a known fact that pulse audio sucks for EVERYONE.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Windows certainly can't do it!

        Windows 7 or Vista instructions: Right-click on the little speaker icon in the bottom right. Click "Playback devices". Right-click on the device you want to use instead of you current device. Click "Set as Default Device". The audio output will instantly switch to that device.

        • you can do it in xp as well, but you have to restart the application using sound
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by trjonescp (954259)

          Windows certainly can't do it!

          Windows 7 or Vista instructions: Right-click on the little speaker icon in the bottom right. Click "Playback devices". Right-click on the device you want to use instead of you current device. Click "Set as Default Device". The audio output will instantly switch to that device.

          I assumed the GP was referring to the ability to move sound from between output devices on different computers. In the middle of playing. (Both machines running PulseAudio, of course) This is what makes PulseAudio worth the growing pains that it has been.

          • by Anpheus (908711)

            Ultimately the response to that is the same as the response to people who claim a Linux feature doesn't work.

            The Windows driver API is open and you can code against it, why not write your own playback device that outputs over the network?

            • by node 3 (115640)

              Ultimately the response to that is the same as the response to people who claim a Linux feature doesn't work.

              And ultimately the response to *that* is the *same* as the response Windows users give...

              The Windows driver API is open and you can code against it, why not write your own playback device that outputs over the network?

              Which is, why go through all that effort when that feature already works on Linux?

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                No one has gone through the effort because, despite what you may believe, the great masses don't care if their sound system can play to another computer since PulseAudio still makes doing so tricky. Its infinitely easier to just turn the speakers up louder so whatever is playing can be heard elsewhere.
          • by Yfrwlf (998822)
            PA growing pains should not have been forced upon users of the most popular Linux distro. They should have only switched to it when it was actually ready, and it still doesn't seem to be. "Linux" still suffers from horrible sound lag and crackling issues. To get rid of that stereotype, most distros need to move to what works or get it fixed before a final release.
    • by agrif (960591)

      I'm going to agree with the sibling here. I always hear about people bashing pulseaudio, but I've never had any issues with it. I also particularly enjoy the low-latency networked audio features. I can play the audio from my movie on the laptop through the speakers at my computer when it's connected to the TV. Which is great, because the desktop's real close and my TV speakers suck.

    • Your mileage may vary. I did have slight p-problems with pulseaudio in their earlier versions, now I don't have them anymore, they were fixed for me. Anyway, Pulseaudio is very handy for my bluetooth headset. Rerouting audio streams is also very convenient.

      • by mrsmiggs (1013037) on Friday January 15, 2010 @08:30PM (#30786662)
        Pulseaudio should be taken outside and shot. I too thought we'd put the troubles behind us but on upgrading to 9.10 I found everything and gone completely to pot again with no audio at all. ALSA at least plays sound but the start up sounds don't quite chime correctly, now I know at some point I'll want to get the thing working again because Pulseaudio has some useful features. However I do have to wonder if Ubuntu's priorities right at all, I shouldn't have to dive into config files and command-line just to get sound working. Please Canonical just get sound working for everyone, once that's done you can worry about the positioning and colour of the notification dialogue.
        • by retchdog (1319261)

          Seriously. On my desktop, the audio for an application would start out fine and then gradually fade to static in 5-10 seconds. What kind of a bug would do that? It's mind-boggling.

          Anyway I installed some manager app and fiddled mindlessly with settings for a while, which magically fixed it.

        • I concur.

          The last two upgrades left me without sound until I purged pulseaudio with fire.

          I understand what it's supposed to do. If it would do that, I'd absolutely love it. I'm psyched about the possibilities. But at the moment, I can't get it to function.

          I have ALSA, and it works. I need to be able to "sudo apt-get install pulseaudio", reboot, and have that work. I've spent years of my life fucking around with audio under linux. I'm at the point where if it works, I'm not going to

    • by couchslug (175151)

      "I'm not much enthused by Ubuntu anymore."

      It's virtues are ease of installation and convenience of adding useful software that isn't included in "purist" distros, but Ubuntu is the "AOL"
      of the Linux world.AOL was once very useful to masses of users. They don't need it any more...

      Given the indifference of Ubuntu management to release quality Ubuntu won't be useful much longer. The beauty of Linux is that there are and will remain many alternatives.

      • by ultranova (717540)

        Given the indifference of Ubuntu management to release quality Ubuntu won't be useful much longer. The beauty of Linux is that there are and will remain many alternatives.

        It's been a while since I've last used a distro, rather than used metaphorical duct tape to keep patching my old system. What's the least-grief choice nowadays?

        • by mrmeval (662166)

          I have not found one. After Ubuntu shat pablum residue on my system I tried in order.

          Kubuntu, wow KDE is shit when it used to blow gnome awway.
          Madrivel It just didn't work and is alien enough to be unconfigurable.
          SUSE It had serious X issues.

          Fedora 10, it sort of worked and I could deal with it. Upgraded to 11 and have so far managed to keep sound working for the few hours I need it a day. Via one of the alternative yum repositories efforts 3D works for ATI. I even managed to get Doom3 to talk to pppulseaud

  • I wish they'd stop (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I wish they'd stop focusing on increasing performance by a few milliseconds here and there and work out why my upgrades never work, or flash objects turn grey and i have to restart firefox or why my audio is choppy, and why the nvidia drivers make Xorg fail randomly or why I have to press the power button on my PC to take it off after everthing is unloaded.

    • or flash objects turn grey and i have to restart firefox

      You'll have to ask Adobe about that one. Ubuntu developers cannot trace into software for which they do not have the source code. Or is this happening to you in Gnash?

      • It also doesn't (always) require a firefox restart. Open a task-viewer (top, htop, system monitor, etc.) Find npviewer.bin (the flash plugin process), then kill it. Do a full reload (Ctrl+F5) of the page. Firefox will restart the flash plugin and it should work, so long as it doesn't crash again. Note that it may be better to restart firefox, given how poorly written the flash plugin is I'd not trust it to die cleanly.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by cecom (698048)
        I am guessing it used to work before the OS upgrade, so that is a completely valid question. The attitude "we don't care if software which is not distributed by us breaks on OS upgrade" is not going to fly for long if the OS is to get some real mass usage.
        • by tepples (727027)

          The attitude "we don't care if software which is not distributed by us breaks on OS upgrade" is not going to fly for long

          That wouldn't be a problem if third-party software developers would share their source code with Canonical. Someone could debug into it and easily discover the problem. But apparently, source access would break some third-party software developers' business models.

    • by clarkn0va (807617)
      Or why when you post to a discussion on Ubuntu bugs in 2007 the post doesn't show up on /. until 2010.
  • Alphas aren't even feature complete... Wait at least for beta...? I mean, the roles could be reversed in the beta, or next alpha.

    • It is worth testing to pick up regressions so that you can fix them. Something like the extreme Postgre slowdown they showed. It is better to catch that at the alpha stage.

    • by Korin43 (881732)
      What confuses me is why they're doing performance tests on alpha releases. Obviously the answer is to get page views, but how long will it take people to realize that performance isn't what they're trying for in the alpha..
    • by nurb432 (527695)

      Slow news day apparently.

    • by nametaken (610866) *

      Or worse, comparing an alpha of one distro to a prealpha of another distro, as if the numbers are at all useful. It tells us nothing about their individual speeds by the time we'll be using them, and tell us nothing useful about the speed of either distro. WTF?

  • I remember reading that ext4 loses data. Has this been addressed?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Nerdfest (867930)
      Seeing as Google is switching to it, I certainly hope so.
    • by XanC (644172)

      You could lose data on it, if your software is poorly-written. Ext4 now caters to this poorly-written software, which is why it's lost some of its performance.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by MojoMagic (669271)
      As I understand it, the issue is that the default time between cache dumps to disk is 4 seconds. This is much longer than ext2/3. So, if you yank the power cable during this time, on the next reboot ext4 will have no record of the event ever having occured and will use the previously journaled data instead. If this is actually the case, then I don't really consider this a bug. It's just a larger cacheing window. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
      • by Anpheus (908711) on Friday January 15, 2010 @07:59PM (#30786404)

        If it breaks user's expectations or destroys user's data, no matter how much anyone tries to convince me otherwise, it is a bug.

        • by Quantumstate (1295210) on Friday January 15, 2010 @08:46PM (#30786814)

          They resolved an issue which lead to file being overwritten being left empty on a crash. The problem was that they were optimising the write order to make performance better. This lead to metadata being updated too early in some cases so you would get a corrupted file. Now the issue has been resolved which lowered the performance although I think there may be an option you could turn on. So if an application is updating the file you will get the old version or the new version (assuming they have written the program in a half decent way) of the file which is good enough. If you want anything better than that you should be running a UPS which should be correctly configured to safely shut the system down (unlike one system I experienced that had a UPS but then everything crashed when the UPS ran out of battery because the sysadmins were appalling).

  • Why Ubuntu? (Score:1, Offtopic)

    by jez9999 (618189)

    Why compare Ubuntu with anything? In my experience it's Debian, with a horrible colour scheme and a screwed up GUI. It's gone downhill so fast it's been like a toboggan ride.

    • Why compare Ubuntu with anything?

      Because right now it is the msot popular flavor of Linux with Fedora not far behind.

      In my experience it's Debian, with a horrible colour scheme and a screwed up GUI.

      Use another OS if it bothers you that much.

      It's gone downhill so fast it's been like a toboggan ride.

      In what ways?

    • Wanna know why Ubuntu is the linux flavor to beat? It's fun to use. No messy compiling of the kernel, no conf files to edit to get it up and running, it just works. Especially with the latest revamp of the alsa interface, not to mention the snazzy layout of the repo browser. Track record last few releases has been good.
      • by MrHanky (141717) on Friday January 15, 2010 @06:42PM (#30785758) Homepage Journal

        There's no 'compiling of the kernel, no conf files to edit' in Debian or any other mainstream distro either. Hell, even Arch Linux does well without custom kernel compilations, and most editing of config files as well, IIRC (depends on usage of course; not that I'd recommend it to any newbie anyway).

        The 'it just works' factor isn't something unique for Ubuntu: almost all the others have it as well (LFS an exception). The only thing Ubuntu gives you is a package that will mostly fit the average desktop user in the default install. Pretty much like Mandriva and others. Kernel compilation is not and has not been necessary for more than ten years for any of the mainstream distros.

    • by nostriluu (138310)
      You forgot unnecessary default bloatware (mono) and a propensity to cover up useful text screens with useless graphical screens. But still, I'd take Ubuntu over Fedora anyday, at least there's some kind of real attitude about support compared to Fedora's ambivalence.
    • Let me air my grievances too: I have recently set up a vps with ubuntu and was just horrified by the package management. There is aptitude, apt-*, and dpkg-*, all of them are verbose and none of them seem to do what I tell to do.

      I wanted to remove apache: "aptitude remove apache" didn't do anything useful and "aptitude remove apache2.2-common" wanted to install something else. Finally I just put ArchLinux in a chroot and was done with it.

      mod me -1 drunk if you must

    • by bcrowell (177657)

      It's gone downhill so fast it's been like a toboggan ride.

      That may be an exaggeration, but I kind of agree. I've been using ubuntu since Edgy, steadily upgrading, and am now using Karmic. Starting with Jaunty, and now continuing with Karmic, I've been having multiple serious problems with sound. Karmic is also causing me several problems where they changed something and made sure it worked with Gnome, but it doesn't work properly with other WMs: 1 [launchpad.net], 2 [launchpad.net].

  • by Zombie Ryushu (803103) on Friday January 15, 2010 @06:04PM (#30785340)

    What often really matters are the upstream apps. Often, other than reporting an upstream bug in an application to the developer, there is not much one can really do about bugs in upstream applications like KDE. I am seeing that now with KDE and X.org. Currently, there is a bug in evdev and dga in X that prevents X from working right with a Wiimote. It can't really be fixed by the distributor. Only X.org can fix it.

    So far I have:

    Broken Sound effects on Stratagus. (Mandriva 2010.0)
    Broken GLX Support on QuakeForge. (Mandriva 2010.0) But DarkPlaces Quake still works.
    Broken Wiimote Support in the evdev driver.

    These are just a few examples of applications that don't work becaues of a problem upstream.

    • by ke4qqq (678293)
      If your distribution closely follows upstream, and has a good policy on dealing with upstream it can help to report bugs. The keys to this are 1. Patching the distributions instance of a package as little as possible, so it's as much like upstream as possible 2. Having packagers work closely with upstream to ensure that bugs filed against the distribution are filed against the upstream project. 3. If a fix is made in the distribution- to get that patch offered upstream.
    • by Ant P. (974313)

      Broken Wiimote Support in the evdev driver.

      I must've missed something... when did Nintendo switch over to using standard HID protocols instead of their proprietary wiimote one which has never worked on any OS's standard input driver?

  • This 'review' is complete rubbish alpha and beta builds are allays much slower than the production versions. They have all types of debug options turned on. I don' see how you can compare them. If one os has more debug options turned on than the other it would be slower. Surely....
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Sfing_ter (99478)

      unless of course it is a windows alpha or beta, then it is blazing fast and feature rich. Sigh....

      • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        And, of course, must faster than the final release.

  • Wake me when Grub2 supports FakeRAID...

  • Come again? (Score:5, Funny)

    by JohnnyBGod (1088549) on Friday January 15, 2010 @06:59PM (#30785912)

    What the hell is a bad performance improvement?

    • What the hell is a bad performance improvement?

      You're so analytical! Sometimes you just have to let /. summaries... flow... over you.

  • Totally useless (Score:3, Insightful)

    by linuxgurugamer (917289) on Friday January 15, 2010 @08:10PM (#30786514) Homepage

    First off, let me say that I use Ubuntu 9.10 on my system at work. I am also running CentOS on servers, various Ubuntu on servers and a couple of Fedora systems. As you can see, I have experience with all of them.

    So why is this review useless? Because they are testing development systems, which are not optimized, have loads of debugging flags set, and essentially are not ready for prime time. Of course it may be running slower!

    IMHO, you should ignore benchmarks until the release candidates, at least. I generally ignore benchmarks on unreleased systems. I do, however, like to read and learn about new features which may be present in early releases.

  • Well that was a waste of time, wasn't it? Durrrr.

  • The PostMark disk performance between Ubuntu 9.10 and 10.04 Alpha 2 was close while Fedora 13 was behind, but again given the debugging options used during the development cycle and its pre-alpha state we aren't worrying too much.

    What's the point of your 'benchmark' then?

After any salary raise, you will have less money at the end of the month than you did before.

Working...