Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Television Media Entertainment Linux

D-Link's New Boxee Box Runs Linux, Eyes Netflix 138

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the one-ui-to-rule-them dept.
DeviceGuru writes "OpenBoxeeBox.com is reporting that D-Link's new DM-380 Boxee Box, demonstrated last night in New York at Boxee's Boxee Beta unveiling, runs Linux but does not yet stream Netflix video-on-demand titles. However, according to an unnamed Boxee insider, 'the goal is to have the device support Netflix.' The DM-380 features ports for HDMI, optical digital and analog audio, dual USB, and wired Ethernet, plus it has an SD card slot and built-in WiFi. Photos and screenshots are at OpenBoxeeBox, and additional details are on D-Link's website."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

D-Link's New Boxee Box Runs Linux, Eyes Netflix

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @09:47AM (#30376400)

    I aint trollin...

  • by gad_zuki! (70830) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @09:48AM (#30376406)

    What? No Lotus notes and a machine gun?

  • It looks like crap (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MistrBlank (1183469) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @09:50AM (#30376422)

    This will never sell. It doesn't fit into the entertainment center paradigm. It looks like a puzzle box and a toy.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ottothecow (600101)
      Granted it isn't large enough that you would try setting some other full sized entertainment device (dvd player or such) on top of it but....damn guys, you couldn't even set your remote control on top of that thing
    • This will never sell. It doesn't fit into the entertainment center paradigm. It looks like a puzzle box and a toy.

      I thought you were joking, then I went and looked at the pics. Here's hoping they make one that looks a bit more, uhhh, normal.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by manyxcxi (1037382)

      This will never sell. It doesn't fit into the entertainment center paradigm. It looks like a puzzle box and a toy.

      I don't think it looks like crap, but it definitely doesn't look like it belongs in my A/V cabinet. Just make it look like a DVD player or something close and I think it would have a better chance of taking off. But, then again, the only people who will be buying this to begin with already know what Boxee is, which means this thing was never going to sell well anyways.

      • by qortra (591818) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @10:06AM (#30376564)

        the only people who will be buying this to begin with already know what Boxee is

        You may turn out to be right if D-Link doesn't market this properly, but your underlying assumption is false. By way of example, most people who buy Nokia phones didn't already know what Symbian is. All people have to know to buy it is that it can stream "CNN, Hulu, CBS, YouTube, MLB.TV, Netflix (coming soon), Comedy Central, and more!"

        • and more

          It's given that the killer feature is porn, right?

        • Marketing? Yeah right. The REAL issue will be SUPPORT. Having had to deal with D-Link support (both consumer and professional), I'd much rather be slowly eviscerated with a knitting needle.

          And if it's something that can't be reduced to a cookie-cutter firmware setting with no options available, D-Link will fuck it up.

          • I'll second that - had a cheap 30 dollar switch die within a few weeks - they asked for me to send in the CD and the rubber feet , if not they'd charge me an additional $12 for the CD and $2 for the rubber feet ....
        • by forand (530402)
          Did boxee get Hulu working again? Last I heard it was dead.
      • by gknoy (899301)

        It looks "interesting", but also useless. I can't stack anything on top of it, like my remotes, or game controllers, or a stack of DVDs. I'm unlikely to buy one so strange shaped.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by elrous0 (869638) *
      Reminds me of a couple of years back when we hired a designer fresh out of art school. He had plenty of artistic and creative energy, but little to no concern with what consumers actually wanted or needed. I think he lasted about 6 months. I guess he's not compromising his vision in the unemployment line now.
      • That reminds me, an agency compliance guru at a telco once commented "Those fancy plastic bezels you guys all design to differentiate your product? We rip them off and throw them away before the equipment goes in a rack."
    • by jo42 (227475)

      You are being too kind, merely using "crap" to describe it. Start with "fugly" and go from there. It needs a copious beating with an Apple beauty stick.

    • by Xoltri (1052470)
      I never understood why they still make home theater electronics so huge with gobs of empty space in them just to fit someone's idea of how they should stack together. This isn't 1980 anymore, move on.
    • by uglyduckling (103926) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:49AM (#30377488) Homepage
      This is TINY. It's not meant to fit into any 'paradigm', it's meant to live behind the TV amongst the cluster of cables, or else in the gap between the TV panel and the shelf/table it's on, if you prefer to see the unit. Check out TFA, the device is the size of a coke can.
    • by sootman (158191) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @12:04PM (#30377654) Homepage Journal

      It doesn't fit into the entertainment center paradigm.

      FFS, it doesn't fit into an entertainment center, period. [dlink.com] Nor can anything be stacked on top of it. Plus it's needlessly hard to manufacture, find components for, and assemble. This is quite possibly the most horribly designed piece of consumer gear I've ever seen in my life.

      ATTENTION LOSERS WHO WANT TO COPY APPLE: Design doesn't just mean making it look neat. Apple's stuff looks flashy but it actually works. (Most of the time, anyway.) [google.com] And if your design only looks "neat" to 14-year-old males, you should throw it right the fuck away and never venture down that path again. Seriously, this thing looks like a prop from a bad SciFi (excuse me, SyFy) movie-of-the-week, or maybe a Roomba from Eureka [wikipedia.org] that gains sentience and starts causing problems.

    • by MBGMorden (803437)

      No kidding - it didn't take but 1 quick glance at this thing to determine "Nope, I'm not buying that.".

      Then again we may see "corner addons" appear on Ebay to make the thing into an actual box shape . . .

    • by msimm (580077)
      It looks like an interesting experiment. I've been using their DSM-750 [dlink.com] for a year or so and although it's missing some of the more advanced features of something like MythTV (no imdb lookups, no cover browsing) it's been a pretty nice way to get away from the computer and enjoy my media without burning everything to coasters. I agree the design of this thing is terrible (for a piece of functional hardware) but if it does marginally well I'm sure we'll see other vendors take a more tasteful approach in the
    • by tbuskey (135499)

      I don't think it's ugl, but it ain't
      I see lots of reboxing mods.

      My TV is on the wall
      I have a set top box, DVD player and a TiVo stacked.
      It can replace my TiVo for playback, but I probably still want to stack it.....

    • by mcrbids (148650)

      This will never sell. It doesn't fit into the entertainment center paradigm. It looks like a puzzle box and a toy.

      I hit the page for comments, and the first 5 amount to "It'll never work, get off my lawn". I'm reminded that when Apple came out with their first iPod, comments here on slashdork were loaded with downer reviews. Here's a couple of them

      "No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame."

      This, btw, was in the article summary. A little further down:

      Pretty slim, eh? I don't see many sales in the future of iPod.

      Or, next comment down:

      Since when is Apple concerned about market share? They do what capitalism was born to do. Cater to a small market, and do it the right way.

      Sure, not everyone was downer, but being pissy because you can't stick a remote

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Too bad that thing is formed to take as much as space as possible, there is no way I get a permission from the mrs. to purchase one.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Nerdfest (867930)
      One could argue that the design discourages the rear vents from being covered (from what I remember of seeing the design before) but yeah, I prefer audio/video equipment (and computer equipment) to be as FSM intended ... black & rack mount.
    • The thing is the size of a soda can and can be placed anywhere you want, including out of sight. From http://blog.boxee.tv/2009/12/09/step-1-make-a-boxee-box-no-need-to-cut-a-hole/ [boxee.tv] :

      Rest assured the Boxee Box will fit into your entertainment center. If the look doesn’t quite fit with your decor, not to worry. The RF remote means you can place the box out of sight and still control it. Of course, the Boxee Box prefers being on top : )

  • Does anybody know about HD support, I know it has it but curious if it's limited to only 720p like the AppleTV or if it will display 1080i/p. And is there anything to stop me from installing XBMC on there. (I doubt there is but I'm not a big fan of boxee)
    • Re:HD Limitations? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by jedidiah (1196) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @10:08AM (#30376580) Homepage

      ...anything interesting hardware-wise most certainly has binary proprietary drivers with no interfaces available for hackers or non-corporate programmers.

      OTOH, you can just get yourself an ION nettop and it won't look like some sort of an attempt at modern art.

    • Does anybody know about HD support, I know it has it but curious if it's limited to only 720p like the AppleTV or if it will display 1080i/p.

      And is there anything to stop me from installing XBMC on there. (I doubt there is but I'm not a big fan of boxee)

      I was looking for a high definition media player and ended up purchasing a Popcornhour Model C200 networked media player after ruling out Apple TV. http://www.popcornhour.com/onlinestore/ [popcornhour.com]

      The C200 accommodates 1 or 2 internal hard drives and has a 3.5" bay for a Blue Ray or DVD player as well. 1080P playback is not a problem. There are very few file formats that won't work with this player.

      Here are the C200 technical specifications: http://www.popcornhour.com/onlinestore/index.php?pluginoption=productspec [popcornhour.com]

  • First thought. Gimmicky, not stackable and this is something that Tivo should have already done. Seems like a bunch of us had the same first impression too. Won't bode well.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by uglyduckling (103926)
      Everyone here is missing the point. This is TINY. It's the size of a coke can (look further down TFA). You don't stack anything on it - even if it were right-angled it's way too small and the vents would get covered. The idea is that you put it between the shelf/table/base of the TV is on and the bottom edge of the TV panel. Or hide it behind out of the way.
  • opengl to directx? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @10:21AM (#30376682)
    Interesting bits from the Boxee beta preview page. [openboxeebox.com] First it lists 'Official support for OS X "Snow Leopard" and Ubuntu "Karmic"', then it goes on to say:

    Finally, Ronen notes that with the Beta release, Boxee's graphical engine has migrated from from OpenGL to DirectX, allowing it to take advantage of Direct X video acceleration.

    So the "officially supported" OS X and Ubuntu versions will be running on OpenGL, but the Windows version gets full hardware acceleration by using DirectX?

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      In what sense is OpenGL not "full hardware accelleration"? I'm legitimately curious, not snarking. Are we talking hardware video decoding?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by limaxray (1292094)

      The Ubuntu version (and I assume the OS X version) use OpenGL solely for the menus and overlays. VDPAU is used for decoding video on the GPU, and it works exceptionally well.

      Up until now though, this meant Windows users were SOL when it came to hardware accelerated video decoding - I'm guessing DirectX gives them this functionality.

      The amusing part though is that the original project (XMBC) used DirectX since it only ran on the original XBox, and the XBMC project ported to OpenGL to support other platforms

  • Is there anything out there like this that also does DTV/PVR?
    I don't want to have multiple computers to maintain sitting around my TV set.
    Oh, yeah, and it has to run Linux.

    Thanks.

    • Is there anything out there like this that also does DTV/PVR?
      I don't want to have multiple computers to maintain sitting around my TV set.
      Oh, yeah, and it has to run Linux.


      Yes, it's called a Linux box running MythTV (or some other PVR software) and Boxee.
      • by Kludge (13653)

        Yes, it's called a Linux box running MythTV (or some other PVR software) and Boxee.

        Yeah, I tried setting all that up. Got mythtv installed, got the database going, got the client going, got the programming service going, got the recording going, etc, etc. Then I tried to play a video that I recorded and... blank screen. I could play the video directly with mplayer, xine, kaffiene, etc. etc, but no go with Mythtv.

        I'm sure I have the ability to diagnose and fix the problem, but I am at a time in my life where I now have significantly more cash than time. I am willing to blow the latter

        • by jedidiah (1196)

          Have fun waiting...

          Meanwhile, the rest of us will be using DIY franken-systems and spending the vast majority of our time simply using what you can't be bothered to spend a little time to build.

        • by tji (74570)

          I'm in the same position.. I tried XBMC / Plex / Boxee as "the one true frontend". But, had no end of problems getting MythTV working with it. I got tantalizing glimpses of it working well, but it never stayed working.

          I also have been using a Mac Mini as an HTPC that can do most everything I need between Front Row / iTunes, Plex/Boxee, and MythTV Frontend. It works passably well. But, I ran into too many oddities with the Mac OS X version of MythFrontend (others claim it's rock solid for them, so Y

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by jhol13 (1087781)

      Yes, for example TViX PVR M-6640N or DreamBox. I don't know where you live, those probably do not work in USA as they use DVB-S/C/T.

      It would seem that WD TV Live Full HD might be better than the "advertised". YMMV.

    • by dsoltesz (563978)

      Why do you want this thing? Just get over it and build your own.

    • I recommend having a computer handle the back-end work of recording and separate devices that can accept network streams at each TV. As for a setup that allows this, I know Dvico makes many, including this http://www.tvix.co.kr/ENG/products/PVRM6640N.aspx [tvix.co.kr] for recording. I can't verify their reliability though, never used one.
  • Still no Blu-Ray? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tyr_7BE (461429) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @10:45AM (#30376854)

    That's too bad. Otherwise this would have been a serious contender for my next media box.

    It seems there's no "do-it-all" media center on the market. Games, Blu-Ray, XBMC. Pick any two. I'm waiting for someone to get XBMC going on a PS3. When that happens, I will have chosen my corner in this fight.

    • by Cajun Hell (725246) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:36AM (#30377336) Homepage Journal

      Don't buy Blu-Ray until the DRM gets more fully defeated. When Blu-Ray becomes ready, there will be some BD library that developers will be able to use to read the discs, and people will be able to implement players without getting licenses that specify that the product is required to suck (which is why there currently aren't any good players), and then good players (all-in-one boxes, MythTV, etc) will finally appear on the market.

      Until then, if you want high-definition movies, just let pirates deal with the hassles of Blu-Ray's flakiness, and you can download them with bittorrent. You'll end up with movies that just work, including with your own all-in-one box.

      Save your money until Blu-Ray becomes a serious consumer-friendly product. Right now, it's a problem-plagued scam for suckers only.

      • Don't buy blu-ray at all. It's a transition format. Just enough to showcase the higher resolution screens we were trying to push (to get the digital terrestrial broadcast rollout going), but the rough edges are very visible. For instance, high-contrast regions frequently show visible fringing, and low contrast regions show blockiness on the disks I've tried so far.

        Go ahead and rent, but blu-ray isn't going to be long-term for a number of reasons. In terms of picture quality, it's not like VHS where ther

        • Do you have any reasons other than your own to believe this, or is BluRay technologically inferior to the next-gen displays?
          • No, just my own experience. I suppose it could just be that the people responsible for the tailoring the compression aren't being as thorough as they could be: it might take six times as long to properly look over the details, time they're just not given. Possibly they're using tiny monitors with bad eyes, or worse, monitors whose resolution is less than the target resolution in scaling mode.

            I really don't have a good explanation for why something with six times the data capacity as DVD, and a target outp

            • by adolf (21054)

              In my experience, it depends a lot on the material.

              I've got a reasonably well-calibrated 52" Samsung 1080p LCD, which I sit about 9 feet from.

              The biggest problem I've noticed with Blu-Ray is that some (mostly older) releases are badly transferred, as if someone simply took some 480p DVD video and scaled it up. The picture is too soft.

              Usually, though, things look (and sound!) rather nice. And I consider myself quite a picky bastard when it comes to encoding errors.

              Perhaps your display is just set up poorly

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by crazycheetah (1416001)

      If you could find a USB blu-ray drive, you should be able to just plug it right in there. The wikipedia page on it says something about it being licensed for use in blu-ray players, so that should work, in theory. Though XBMC (or Boxee, comparing it to this box; it's built off of XBMC) on a PS3 would kick this thing's ass, easily.

      • by Sancho (17056)

        This box runs Linux. Plugging in the Bluray drive won't get you anywhere towards watching Bluray movies.

    • I'm waiting for someone to get XBMC going on a PS3.

      But don't hold your breath. It's technically possible, but it's going to be a lot difficult.

      You see the PS3 isn't closed to homebrew development. Quite the countrary. You can even install Linux on it and develop whatever you want.
      But there's a restriction, when running homebrew software, the hypervisor doesn't give access to the GPU.
      You can program all the scientific number-crunching application you want, you have full access to the CELL SPU units for some crazy parallel computing. But no 3D GFX only limite

      • by Sancho (17056)

        The PS3 used to be able to rip Bluray DVDs merely by using dd. I assume that Sony put a stop to that, however.

        • I might have failed to express myself correctly :
          I wasn't speaking about obtaining the files from a Blueray. That's also easy to do on PC.

          I was speaking about the decryption of Bluerays' DRM (AACS encryption and BD+) with which the content of said files is encrypted.
          As the PS3 plays Bluerays, it must have valid device keys into its firmware (or into some dedicated TPM-like chip).
          (Just like, on PC, WinDVD and PowerDVD have similar keys).

          Or do you mean that the way the PS3 is build, the Blueray drive can decr

          • by Sancho (17056)

            Sorry, my mistake then!

            You're right, Sony would almost certainly not want to allow that.

    • by fm6 (162816)

      You do not want a consumer device with an optical drive built in, unless the drive is the device. It's always the first thing to fail. That's not a big deal on computers, where such drives are commodity OEM products, so replacing them is not an expensive send-it-back-to-the-factory process. But everybody I know who's bought a TV, VCR, or game console with a blu-ray built in has regretted it.

      Since this box looks extremely hackable, you could probably add a blu-ray drive to it. Problem solved.

      'm waiting for someone to get XBMC going on a PS3.

      Why does it have

  • Netflix (Score:1, Troll)

    by qazwart (261667)

    Doesn't Netflix use SILVERLIGHT?

    Let's see:

    1). BoxeeBox uses Linux.
    2). Linux doesn't run Silverlight.
    3). You need Silverlight to run Netflix

    Now fill in the missing word:

    Therefore, BoxeeBox will never be able to run ____________.

    The truth is that I've given up on standard Linux distros when it comes to multimedia. It simply isn't as good as Windows or Mac OS X. For about a year, we tried to run Mythbuntu, then Ubuntu w/ MythTV and Boxee. It simply never worked very well. Incompatibility issues with drivers an

    • Doesn't Netflix use SILVERLIGHT?

      Let's see:

      1). BoxeeBox uses Linux. 2). Linux doesn't run Silverlight. 3). You need Silverlight to run Netflix

      Now fill in the missing word:

      Therefore, BoxeeBox will never be able to run ____________.

      Roku runs Linux, and does Netflix. Now... Doesn't do much of anything else, but it does run Netflix.

      The truth is that I've given up on standard Linux distros when it comes to multimedia. It simply isn't as good as Windows or Mac OS X. For about a year, we tried to run Mythbuntu, then Ubuntu w/ MythTV and Boxee. It simply never worked very well. Incompatibility issues with drivers and configuration problems drove us up the wall. When Windows 7 came out, we "upgraded" to Windows 7. (Why not?, it was originally a Windows Vista box).

      I have Linux on several personal PCs, my media center, lots of systems at work, and some provate clients. Other than WiFi, I have no driver issues, and other than Netflix, no multimedia issues. While DVR functionality is lacking, if you are having multimedia problems, you are having problems, not Linux.

      The problem I see with the Boxee Box is that it is competing against HDTVs that can connect with Netflix right out of the box. Plus, these HDTVs are better at displaying video than what Boxee will be able to do.

      Boxxee can do 1080p. What TV do you have that can do better? The rest of your comment is dead on... As

      • Flash is just bad on all operating systems, not just linux. It has the advantage of doing something on a lot of different machines, but it's a braindead least-common-denominator to do it. Flash video is just bog standard other kinds of video, but because it's encapsulated in flash, it has to be decoded in flash, which only uses the CPU. Why the heck should Hulu, which isn't even SD in resolution, require "2.0 ghz Core Duo" as a minimum when better-resolution video plays just fine on an iPod.

    • by Nadaka (224565)

      moonlight is a linux implementation of silverlight. It has at least some support from microsoft.

      • moonlight is a linux implementation of silverlight. It has at least some support from microsoft.

        But it has none of the MS DRM, so it will not do any secure Silverlight stuff, like NetFlix.

        • by Nadaka (224565)

          That could be part of the "eventual" aspect. It may be implemented in moonlight at some point.

    • Tivos runs Linux. Tivos support Netflix. Therefore, BoxeeBox might just be able to run Netflix.

      It's still ugly, though. Maybe someone will offer a 3rd party case for it.

    • Two options, either Moonlight improves to the state where it can work with the Netflix service, or D-Link goes to Netflix and says 'we have n units installed and connected to TVs, we think this is a market that could make you money and we'd like to work with you to get it supported'. The place I rent DVDs from streams using Flash, so it already works with Linux and OS X. They originally trialled some MS solution, but a lot of people complained (it turns out that the people who ditch their TV and pay a mon
    • You've got it the wrong way around - once D-Link contrives a Linux solution for Netflix streaming, then we'll be able to stream Netflix to any Linux platform we like.

      Yes, it's not possible now, but the Netflix streaming overlords might be more persuaded by a potential corporate partner than they are by the unwashed masses. I wish D-Link the best of luck in this effort!

      • You've got it the wrong way around - once D-Link contrives a Linux solution for Netflix streaming, then we'll be able to stream Netflix to any Linux platform we like.

        Yes, it's not possible now, but the Netflix streaming overlords might be more persuaded by a potential corporate partner than they are by the unwashed masses. I wish D-Link the best of luck in this effort!

        Roku and Tivo both have Netflix on Linux. But it is not open source, so we still do not have it...

    • The technology Netflix uses for streaming movies on your computer (and by that, I mean "your x86 box that runs Mac OS or a modern version of Windows," unfortunately) is, in fact, Silverlight.

      But Netflix is, and has been, pushing hard for more device adoption of streaming -- at this point, you can stream Netflix on Roku boxes, Samsung and LG players, some Sony TVs, PS3s, XBoxes, etc. It's not the case -- and you should not assume -- all these systems are using Silverlight to do aforementioned streaming.

      Some

    • My main multimedia machine runs Linux and is connected to a 47" TV via HDMI. I have no problem running any program and playing back any sort of multimedia. Now, I fix computers for a living and I know there are all levels of comfort when it comes to what people expect. My thoughts here are just that, that it is the end-user perspective on what you think should or should not work. We work pretty hard in the Linux community to satisfy people's demands and things get fixed pretty quick.

      What we ask more tha

  • Popcorn Hour (Score:3, Insightful)

    by g8oz (144003) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @02:25PM (#30379204)

    Popcorn Hour still looks better

  • Take a look at the pics of that device. No, really: RTFA. That is one of the dumbest designs for consumer electronics gear I've ever seen. I looks like someone took a cube and hacked off about half of it at a completely random angle, and then laid it awkwardly on its cut side. I don't care what kind of multimedia experience this thing offers, I would not buy this thing simply for its stupid looks.

    I wouldn't be caught dead with this thing in my living room and that's saying a lot since my entertainment cente

I use technology in order to hate it more properly. -- Nam June Paik

Working...