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Open Source Linux

Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released 195

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the download-compile-reboot-repeat dept.
diegocg writes "Linus Torvalds has officially released the version 2.6.32 of the Linux kernel. New features include virtualization memory de-duplication, a rewrite of the writeback code faster and more scalable, many important Btrfs improvements and speedups, ATI R600/R700 3D and KMS support and other graphic improvements, a CFQ low latency mode, tracing improvements including a 'perf timechart' tool that tries to be a better bootchart, soft limits in the memory controller, support for the S+Core architecture, support for Intel Moorestown and its new firmware interface, run-time power management support, and many other improvements and new drivers. See the full changelog for more details."
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Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released

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  • by sheepweevil (1036936) on Thursday December 03, 2009 @11:13AM (#30310372) Homepage
    All of these features are cool and all, but does it solve the well-known XKCD 619 [xkcd.com] bug?
  • by Sockatume (732728) on Thursday December 03, 2009 @11:19AM (#30310446)

    rewrite of the writeback code

    So you didn't de-lace the interace or uncabulate the turboencabulator? I'm now about 85% convinced that the open source movement is just making shit up.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 03, 2009 @11:20AM (#30310460)

    http://imgur.com/73EAu [imgur.com] - RESOLVED, FIXED quite a while now!

  • KSM (Score:2, Funny)

    by svtdragon (917476) on Thursday December 03, 2009 @12:32PM (#30311682)

    Linux 2.6.32 introduces what is called "KSM"

    WHAT!? I know Linux users are pretty militant (myself among them), but to implement terrorism [wikipedia.org] in the kernel?

    Please tell me it's at least built as a *module* by default!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 03, 2009 @12:35PM (#30311748)

    Windows is version 7. That's WAY MORE than linux. Linux suxors !! use old obsolete shit OS, dumasses to the max !!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 03, 2009 @12:41PM (#30311900)

    But is it?
    A 7th version of a crap OS is still crap.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 03, 2009 @06:17PM (#30317480)

    This has a side effect of kernel hacking being better financed than desktop development, as there are more commercial players interested specifically in the kernel, who couldn't care less about KDE or Gnome.

    Interesting, innit? It's not that you get what you pay for, but even that there's nothing to be gotten when no one pays at all.

    Only paid devs are pros. Fact. Not that hackers in basements suck that much at coding, more that as soon as they get any marketable skills, they get a JOB and stop coding for free. Then one in a billion ends up getting paid to insert useless features in Linux Corporate Editions (AppArmor? Database snapshots?) instead of Flash, mp3/divx codecs, 3D support, and Linuxes for Netbookses that DO wake up the WiFi card when unsuspended.

    Bah, it's not like anyone will ever get Linux pre-installed on everyone's computer. Give me OSX any day...
    Face it :You'd have to be very high on very dangerous drugs to even begin to think that any Linux desktop is anywhere near as usable as OSX. That's a fact too. And Apple took a BSD, an even more obscure and arcane Unix than Linux, and turned it into the world's best OS, the one everyone wet-dreams about when they're banging their chairs on their keyboards because of Windows or Linux. Why doesn't Canonical or some such get their heads out their asses and build a dev team that will simply Make It Work Well Together? No, not ever. They couldn't even sell it. "Other means of" getting nothing for your work. Yeah. IBM pays for Apache, Novell for Samba, blah blah blah - no one pays for porting Aqua and Finder or anything as usable. Strange that.

    Using Linux on a desktop is fighting a losing battle from the start. Linux is a great educational project. It certainly can be used in embedded devices, as long as you don't use code that some BigCorp pays for, because those (only those) have Teams Of Lawyers On Salary that will bankrupt you in court before they oblige you to publish the code (so you'll disclose the changes their moron code-pissers couldn't drool by themselves). Great for servers, because if you blow enough cash you can get the nice little labels that say everything is compatible together AND then call the Certified Technician when it doesn't work.

    But for clients? "Oh noes, we'd have to maintain tens of drivers for tens of chip models! Woes!" Tens? Mobo chipsets are not that varied. Intel distributes about four versions of INF update for each Windows from XP to 7, supporting ICH4 to 10 (and if you have a 440BX, it's about time you trash your PII), nvidia has stopped making them, VIA and SIS each have one arch and a couple variations per gen, all driver-compatible in such a majority of specs that only coding the common ones would lose about zero functionality. Anyone else?
    Oh, yeah, graph cards. Old mantra about protecting patents that might be lurking in the code... not their own IP, blah blah blah... shut up, gimme that NDA *signs* now gimme the specs, now let me torrent them, okay now they're public knowledge and a billion geeks duplicate them. Come protect not-quite-your IP now.

    Lost the point several times. Bah. Linux sucks, buy a mac.

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