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GNU is Not Unix Linux

Taking Free Software To the Streets 184

Posted by Soulskill
from the spreading-the-word dept.
An anonymous reader writes "It's that time of year again; the nights are drawing in, the leaves are beginning to turn, and literally hundreds of teams of dedicated F/OSS enthusiasts from around the world are preparing to hit the streets in celebration of Software Freedom Day 2009. In an effort to increase awareness of free and open source software among the general public, SFD teams will be standing around town centers and shopping malls, holding talks at schools and universities, giving demonstrations and handing out Linux and FOSS collections for Windows on CD. With money being tight and paranoia about malware and viruses at an all-time high, the time is right to help consumers switch to the myriad of quality open source applications available. If you would like to check for an SFD team in your area and consider attending, be it to help out or simply learn more about free software for yourself, there's an interactive map to help you find your way."
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Taking Free Software To the Streets

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  • "Go away" (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:24AM (#29475981)

    "Go away" is my reaction whenever someone on the street wants to give me something free - a religious booklet, a pro-something leaflet, a "work from home" job offer printed out on an inkjet...

    On a sidenote, this would be a perfect opportunity to spread malware. Just pretend you're one of those guys and hand over CDs with some crap that will infect the computer.

    • by Yvan256 (722131) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:26AM (#29475999) Homepage Journal

      On a sidenote, this would be a perfect opportunity to spread malware. Just pretend you're one of those guys and hand over CDs with some crap that will infect the computer.

      I thought giving away copies of Windows ME was illegal?

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Your terrible sense of humor should be illegal. It's goddamn 2009, and you're making jokes about windows ME. Go back to compiling Gentoo or something.

        • Re:"Go away" (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Yvan256 (722131) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:49AM (#29476111) Homepage Journal

          If I had only said "Windows" then I would have been modded troll by Microsoft fanboys. But even those guys know that Windows ME sucked.

          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            You can now officially say Vista. Only the most vicious M$ astroturfers would blame you.

            http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/351652/microsoft-admits-vista-was-a-less-good-product [pcpro.co.uk]

    • Same here. I will ignore you and if you insist on bothering me I will yell.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Your reaction is not universal. And handing out a leaflet is done because it is a method of getting a message to many people cheaply. Yes, many will throw such a leaflet away or not look at it, but some will. So if you look at it from a cost-per-impression basis it's quite effective. What alternative do you propose?
      • by J.Y.Kelly (828209)
        I was in a team handing out CDs in the UK and we spent the morning honing our approach tactics to not scare people off. Some people will never stop for someone in a bright green t-shirt handing out CDs, but plenty of others could be persuaded.

        What we found was:

        * "Have some free software" = FAIL

        You can just see the alarm bells going off in their heads, and frankly I don't blame them.

        * Hide the CDs under a leaflet!

        If you try to give people a CD they often blank you. If you give them a leaflet
    • Re:"Go away" (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Hurricane78 (562437) <deleted@slashBLUEdot.org minus berry> on Saturday September 19, 2009 @02:43PM (#29477771)

      I'd recommend changing your reaction to "you're doing it wrong!".

      Because the trick is not, to come to you. The trick is, to make you come to them, and offer something so great, that you'll beg to get it. ^^

      I recommend putting up a large projection of Compiz an action, giant "Never get Viruses again!" banners, etc.
      Make them drool and wish to throw away their Windows.
      And give away the Linux DVDs in a "Shop price: $xxx" "Get a free copy! Only today!" booth.
      Play music! Add some lights! (But in a way that also drags older people there.)
      Offer tasty food that you can smell on the whole street, drinks, sexy babes/men on two elevated platforms, friendly people (to fulfill our basic needs/interests).
      Sell merchandising that people can afford to buy just out of impulse and for fun! Stickers, T-Shirts, things you can't get anywhere else.
      And add a Linux DVD / open source software DVD to every sale of anything on that booth. Let the sexy people throw the DVDs into the people.
      And do it in a place and at a time, where there are enough people to make it work. If nessecary, work out a deal with a local shopping mall, or something similar.

      That will give you hype and interest! ^^
      You will have 40 year old hockey moms talk to all their friends about that really cute new "Linux" (used as if it were a version of Windows), that they caught, when they were surprised by that hot guy looking at her. She will put the DVD in, it will start, looking really fancy. And when it runs, it throws the full power of beauty and power at them! So that even if they don't understand a thing of it, they will want to learn to have that too.

      Unrealistic? Well, the most common reaction I get from girls, when I show them my Linux desktop is: "I want that too! Can you put that on my computer?". QED. ^^

      • This is the most interesting idea I have ever heard to spread Linux and it sounds like it would work.

        Someone mod this up

    • by iceco2 (703132)

      It seems uneconomic to spread malware by handing out CDs
      thankfully in the malware market a single infected computer is still worth less then
      the price of printing and handing out a CD.

    • Re:"Go away" (Score:5, Insightful)

      by petrus4 (213815) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @03:14PM (#29477969) Homepage Journal

      "Go away" is my reaction whenever someone on the street wants to give me something free - a religious booklet, a pro-something leaflet, a "work from home" job offer printed out on an inkjet...

      Exactly the point. We say, "Go away," when the Mormons, the Jehovah's Witnesses, or members of any other cult show up at our door.

      Is anyone noticing the similarity in tactics that are being used here, between the FSF, and those other organisations, which the FSF's drones probably don't mind acknowledging as cults? ;)

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by smoker2 (750216)
        This is quite true, and I agree. But this time it's not a con. I still wouldn't do it though. People come to free software, or else they do without. But you know zealots ...
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by mdwh2 (535323)

        But showing up at someone's door isn't the same as giving stuff out in the street. And the criticism is also about disputing the claims that Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses etc make.

        If you're going to claim that anyone advertising anything is as bad as Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses turning up at your door, then perhaps you should criticise companies (including software companies) that spend millions on shoving adverts everywhere, rather than a handful of volunteers in the street?

    • "Go away" is my reaction to most adverts full stop. However, it would be rather foolish to conclude that therefore advertising has no effect at all.

  • TLAPD (Score:5, Funny)

    by pushing-robot (1037830) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:28AM (#29476009)

    It's purely coincidental that Software Freedom Day happens to also be Talk Like a Pirate Day... Right?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:35AM (#29476041)

    Standing around town centres like homeless winos. That's the problem with FOSS advocates, they keep coming up with these wacky ideas, and each time they put them into action the public sees.... err, a wacky idea, associated with FOSS.

    If you want to guarantee that the public forever sees FOSS as a fringe thing unworthy of the consideration of normal people then carry on. If you want to really promote FOSS set up a business based on FOSS and make it work and grow.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Standing around town centres like homeless winos. That's the problem with FOSS advocates, they keep coming up with these wacky ideas, and each time they put them into action the public sees.... err, a wacky idea, associated with FOSS.

      If you want to guarantee that the public forever sees FOSS as a fringe thing unworthy of the consideration of normal people then carry on. If you want to really promote FOSS set up a business based on FOSS and make it work and grow.

      Never heard of Red Hat, Novell, Canonical, etc?

    • by Scholasticus (567646) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:06AM (#29476159) Journal
      I wouldn't be too worried about this effect. This isn't going to show up on the radars of most people even as much as all those "Save Farscape" flyers which were all over the place when that show got cancelled. "Joe Public" (a.k.a. Joe Sixpack, a.k.a. Aunt Milly) doesn't even know enough about F/OSS to give a rat's. If F/OSS is ever going to become widely adopted by home users, it will be the same way Windows was - because that was what came installed on the computers people were buying at the time. Netbooks may help with this. Handing out CDs on street corners almost certainly won't.
      • If mobs of FOSS people ran around malls handing out Linux CDs, "Joe Public" would likely avoid them like the plague, but if these same CDs showed up in "Joe's" mailbox, he may be more willing to check it out... maybe. It seemed to work for America Online. AOL also had advertisements going on TV/radio, so at least "Joe" knew somewhat what AOL was for when he saw the CD in the mail.

        So instead of running around in public trying to shove FOSS software down people's throats, the community could come up with so

    • by joaommp (685612) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:17AM (#29476205) Homepage Journal

      I kind of agree with the initiatives in the schools, but if they start doing parades, they would better spend their time (and money) improving the quality and features of the software instead of doing parades which gather little attention. These events won't bring them closer to actually competing with commercial giants. They should do stuff like Google Summer of Code or something like that. Those I believe they it make things go forward because during a few days, people are supposed to be intensely involved into a project. Like pidgin, for instance. I love GSC because every summer, pidgin get's stabler and more features.

      Parades kind of reminds me the "gay pride parades" which end up making them look more ridiculous. The alternative would be mardi grass, but somehow I can't/won't/don't wan't to imagine a topless RMS with beads licking Linus' nipples.

    • by westlake (615356) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:37AM (#29476299)

      Standing around town centres like homeless winos. That's the problem with FOSS advocates, they keep coming up with these wacky ideas...

      It doesn't get any better than this:

      The scene is the Boston Common in late August.

      The event the launch of FSF's "Windows 7 Sins" campaign.

      Special Guest Appearance by Ron Stoppable as Team Mascot. Free Software Foundation - Windows 7 Sins [youtube.com]

      You can expect much of the time - and much of the screen - to given over to a lecture by a paunchy - balding - middle-aged geek.

      540 views.

      It is quite possible for a Win 7 promotional video to net two million viewers. Windows 7 [youtube.com]

    • Beats parking an "I'm a PC" booth outside Apple Store [appleinsider.com]
    • by orasio (188021)

      Again, there are no FOSS advocates.
      There are open source advocates, and free software advocates.
      Open source advocates are the ones who care about software, and how open source is supposed to bring us lots of technical advantages.
      Free software advocates, like me, are the wackier ones, that tell you that Google is taking your freedom away and that you should stay away from proprietary software if you want your kids to be free.
      The first group are the ones that build companies like Redhat, and the ones that hel

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by multisync (218450)

      That's the problem with FOSS advocates, they keep coming up with these wacky ideas, and each time they put them into action the public sees.... err, a wacky idea, associated with FOSS.

      Yeah, those wacky FOSS advocates and their wacky ideas to promote the projects they believe in.

      Lord knows, Microsoft [slashdot.org] would never engage in something as shameless as encouraging their supporters to host parties in their communities and generally evangelize Windows 7 to non-converts.

    • That's the problem with FOSS advocates, they keep coming up with these wacky ideas, and each time they put them into action the public sees.... err, a wacky idea, associated with FOSS.

      Yeah, next thing you know they'll be suggesting people have "FOSS house parties" or throwing butterflies around the place [uspressnews.com]. Or maybe they'll come up with an advertising campaign where they use childish and outdated stereotypes of the competition, portraying them as dumb boring businessmen, whilst FOSS is represented by the cool

  • Malware (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DeadPixels (1391907) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @09:41AM (#29476073)
    With paranoia about malware and viruses at an all-time high, I certainly wouldn't run a CD a stranger on the street gave to me.
    • The beauty of free software is you don't have to. You can spend about 10 minutes searching the internet to learn enough to want to try something out. Or you might learn that you already have free software on your system.
    • by multisync (218450)

      With paranoia about malware and viruses at an all-time high, I certainly wouldn't run a CD a stranger on the street gave to me.

      Agreed. I think a better approach would be to have laptops set up running Ubuntu or whatever and let people try it out there in the mall or wherever. Rather than handing out CDs, give them something with your URL on it. Try to sign them up and get them to come to a meeting, if you have a local user's group. If not, you can point them at an online user's group and suggest they downlo

  • Will not work (Score:4, Insightful)

    by shadowblaster (1565487) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:12AM (#29476185)

    Most people probably won't know what to do with it anyway and it will end up in the bin. The average person will need help installing and configuring linux.

    Even if they try installing it they will end up being frustrated for not being able to get things to work. They will end up scarred by the experience and fall back to Windows.

    Much better to spend their efforts educating students at universities or school. Even better to get universities and schools to convert to FOSS. This way children are forced to learn and work with FOSS. When they grow up they would be able to use the experience to promote FOSS at home/work.

    • "Most people probably won't know what to do with it anyway and it will end up in the bin. The average person will need help installing and configuring linux"

      Insert Ubuntu CD, boot, click on Install, answer a few questions and that's it. Plug in your 3 mobile broadband USB dongle and you're on the Internet. How many Windows users have to install from scratch anyway ?
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Blakey Rat (99501)

        Insert Ubuntu CD, boot, click on Install, answer a few questions and that's it.

        Ok, now I just need to open my wedding invitation Word file from last year and-- ALL MY DOCUMENTS ARE GONE!!!!

        (Psst: you're missing a huge step here.)

        Plug in your 3 mobile broadband USB dongle and you're on the Internet.

        What the fuck is a "3 mobile broadband USB dongle?" I certainly don't have one of those. Will Ubuntu work with my laptop's built-in Wifi? Possibly. My desktop's USB wifi? Doubtful. My desktop's built-in network ca

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by westlake (615356)

          Insert Ubuntu CD, boot, click on Install, answer a few questions and that's it.
          Ok, now I just need to open my wedding invitation Word file from last year and-- ALL MY DOCUMENTS ARE GONE!!!!
          (Psst: you're missing a huge step here.)

          Dual booting or virtualization are things no ordinary user will ever want to do.

          Two operating systems to maintain. Two operating environments. Two software libraries. Multiple skill sets.

          That can be agony for even the most dedicated enthusiast or IT pro.

          If you are looking for FOSS

    • Most people probably won't know what to do with it anyway and it will end up in the bin. The average person will need help installing and configuring anything.

      Fixed it for you

  • Time Bandits (Score:3, Interesting)

    by malevolentjelly (1057140) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:17AM (#29476207) Journal

    So, basically, you're going to take to the streets dead set on destroying peoples' data and wasting their time? Most people have a computing solution that works for them. If they want free software, chances are they will seek it out.

    For most people, this whole operation is going to be abstract, confusing, and really unfortunate if they make the mistake of putting the software onto their machines.

    Remember: all that silly documentation and those help manuals were written for most users. They require that sort of thing. Most open source solutions are terribly documented It's software where you need to *just know* what's going or hit the forums or wikis. That's unacceptable. If software like OpenOffice was any good whatsoever, companies would brand it and sell the media in stores.

    Adapting to a whole new software ecosystem is difficult. It's a terrible time sink that most people don't really have the social motivation for. What's so great about free software? It's free? Is Open Office better then MS Office? No? Is GIMP better than Photoshop or PSP or anything? No? Is Linux easier to use than OEM Windows or Mac? Absolutely not? Wait, why do I care about this again? What if I don't have a fanatical hatred of all things proprietary? What if I am not a freetard, but a productive member of society who needs to use the computer as a tool and not a time wasting obsession? What if I am not into "fighting the power" where "the power" is one of two large software companies that provide a framework to make my home computer usable? What if my computer were like a coffee maker for me, but for email and typing documents and browsing the web?

    In short, anyone idealistic enough to run free software is already doing so.

    • If XP was free software, people wouldn't be forced to upgrade their OS [computerworld.com], they could just download a patch from a third party instead of being held hostage by Microsoft.

      • How is this relevant to a casual home user? Linux has a bevvy of remote vulnerabilities, and yet you as a home user will never be affected by them because nobody wants your documents, your anti-microsoft blog posts, or your porn.

        If someone wanted to fire specially crafted TCP packets to take down your mom's computer, then that's their prerogative. Said person could also just throw a brick through her window or something.

        • by orasio (188021)

          Not upgrading vs. upgrading: Good.
          Remote vulnerabilities are exploited to create bot nets, and casual home users are the most likely to fall for that kind of thing. Having your computer hijacked means you need a reinstall.
          Remote vulnerabilities: Bad.

          So, having a chance of diminishing the chance of having to reinstall due to a hijacking, without having to upgrade is a good way to save time and/or money.

      • Car analogy time

        We just got back from town, on the trip, a convoy of antique cars went by obviously going to or from some rally. Now, I doubt many of those companies exist, or if they do, still offer "official authorized" factory repair parts, which we will term "patches". That market is now made up of enthusiasts who build their own replacement parts, or small shops that turn them out because they know there is a market..just to keep those old cars running. And the same applies to more modern era "muscle c

    • destroying people's data

      When you install Ubuntu into a dual-boot situation, it asks if you want it to import your entire My Documents folder.

      Most open source solutions are terribly documented...you need to...hit the forums or wikis.

      To an extent, I agree with you, but you're overstating your case a bit. I'm certainly not happy with the sorry state of F/OSS documentation, but your implication that proprietary software is any better is nonsense. The software written by the companies Joe Sixpack knows the n

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        When you install Ubuntu into a dual-boot situation, it asks if you want it to import your entire My Documents folder.

        You have to consider that data extends beyond merely the sort you'd store in My Documents. Not all applications follow that proper behavior, beside the fact that a user's application set could be considered part of their data. Many users identify their applications by name, even, not even description or type. It would be safe to say that a user would require a well-written guide with a series of alternatives for popular applications easily available for then. Perhaps Add/Remove Programs should alias keyword

    • If they want free software, chances are they will seek it out.

      I think many people don't know about that part of software landscape, and that it works for many people.

      Otherwise, an interesting point of view.

  • by jrowlingson (1003641) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:29AM (#29476267)

    I know this is probably flamebait, but, it seems like there is no other industry that works as hard as we do to put ourselfs out of jobs.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by icebraining (1313345)

      Almost all code is developed to companies, not individual people. Companies will always need new software, or adapt FOSS to their needs, etc.

      Proprietary != Commercial.

  • by petes_PoV (912422) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:39AM (#29476315)

    handing out Linux and FOSS collections...

    Taking unknown software from people you don't know. Isn't that what the security community has been telling everyone NOT to do for years, decades. Maybe these advocates should think a little about the underlying message they are sending out and stop undoing the good work that others are doing to stop the spread of malware.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by HitoGuy (1324613)
      You're assuming Stallmanists actually think. If they did they'd see through about 90% of the propaganda Stallman cranks out these days.

      I support free software, but only so far as its actually practical. Like, I won't use GNash since it is not as good as Flash, and I want actual 3D acceleration, etc. I won't declare software evil purely because its proprietary but based off of the actual character of the software makers. RMS would rather we just blindly hate on all proprietary software. If I did that I'd
      • RMS is a genious and long ago when computers were not yet consumer products he had foreseen the future. It's hard not to politisize software when it has become a central piece in our lifes. Digital data handled by computers is connected with all aspects of our lifes. With online banking people entrust their life savings to proprietary software, entrust their private diaries and private photos. People have gone to jail over as little as giving a friend a copy of a program, people have gone to jail over dat
  • by HockeyPuck (141947) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @10:51AM (#29476377)

    These guys need to advertise inside or be associated with a particular business that people are going to. Take the grocery store. At my local grocery store, the Girl Scouts often set up a table to sell their cookies. This is a brand that people trust for quality. We trust the Girl Scouts that their product is safe for us to consume. On the other hand, I often see a woman that is sitting on folding chair and when you leave the supermarket she asks you, very quietly if you want Tamales [wikipedia.org]. I wouldn't take a Tamale from this woman if it was free, because I do not trust her.

    The local supermarkets often have people stationed inside providing samples of various products. Usually a retiree standing in front of a table with a small griddle or toaster oven. While I have no interest in the products they are usually preparing, I would trust that they are safe. These guys should set up their table inside of computer stores (Apple Store, BestBuy etc..), atleast that could add some credibility to their product, or atleast the appearance of credibility.

    On the other hand, why should I trust a random group of people on the street? Did we forget the recent incident where hackers mailed malware infected CDs to Credit Unions [slashdot.org]? The only difference is that instead of pretending the CDs come from some gov't organization, they're coming from some "OpenSource" group standing at a table on the street.

    • Actually, that _is_ the plan. At least, the local one is associating itself with a frozen yogurt place.

      Of course, this wasn't at all obvious, since the site itself is hopelessly disorganized, and the front page is a photo of a bunch of geeks, and doesn't really say anywhere what the whole thing is about (the about page says a bit more, but that stuff should be on the front).

      Oh well, maybe some lessons to learn for next year.

  • Too late! (Score:3, Funny)

    by Smivs (1197859) <smivs@smivsonline.co.uk> on Saturday September 19, 2009 @11:50AM (#29476649) Homepage Journal

    Software Freedom Day 2009

    Great idea telling us today...plenty of time to get the local effort organised!

    • Great idea telling us today...plenty of time to get the local effort organised!

      The end of summer is marked by the Open Regatta, the county fair and Peach Festival, jazz concerts in the park, the Labor Day Parade.

      The Back-To-School Sale.

      Crowds are large, receptive, very well fed - they love hand-outs and are open to anyone who puts on a good show.

      If can offer them shade, a coke and a folding chair, so much the better.

      But, geek being geek, he'll chose the chill and wet of autumn - and place himself at the

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Software Freedom Day* *Unless you want to make or use proprietary software then you can simply burn in hell.
  • Expected reaction (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tecnico.hitos (1490201) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @01:32PM (#29477335)

    FOSS Advocate: You are allowed to get the source code and modify the software to better fit your needs.
    Average Joe: Lol wut!?
    FOSS Advocate: ...you also don't have to pay.
    Average Joe: You mean there are programs you have to pay for!?

  • For being one of the most free-software-leaning discussion sites on the internet, the level of derision here for Software Freedom day is odd.

    There is no requirement for Software Freedom day to pass out CDs or leaflets or get in anyone's face. It can be as simple as having a BBQ and inviting your geekiest friends. If you happen to print out some flyers like this [fsf.org] or this [tuxfamily.org] or yikes! even burn a free-software-infested CD I don't think you'll be hurting anyone. If you do happen to have an event, take pictures..
    • Re:Wow Slashdot. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by petrus4 (213815) on Saturday September 19, 2009 @02:27PM (#29477685) Homepage Journal

      For being one of the most free-software-leaning discussion sites on the internet, the level of derision here for Software Freedom day is odd.

      That is an extremely encouraging, healthy, and positive sign.

      The Free Software Foundation, and its' activism, both need to die if Linux is ever going to become anything more than fringe.

      If Slashdot's readership are discouraging of such activism, it will hopefully gradually move us towards a point where said activism ceases to occur.

      I am not saying that I think Linux advocacy should cease entirely. It does, however, need to cease being radical, cultic, and infused with as much hate, fear, and paranoia as it has been in the past. There needs to be far more focus put purely on Linux's technical strengths, and as little as possible put on the mind control of Richard Stallman.

      • I don't see what so radical about encouraging people to cooperatively develop and share software. It's worked well to bring you the Linux kernel, Firefox, OpenOffice and so many other programs you use. It should also be noted that SoftwareFreedomDay.org like many efforts in free software are not "FSF projects" or the result of mind-control. I find the almost pure altruism in releasing software under the GPL or AGPL refreshing. It's a relief in a world where media, thought, and actions are increasingly con
        • I don't see what so radical about encouraging people to cooperatively develop and share software.

          Nothing, unless by "encouraging" you mean preaching that those who don't will burn in hell, pretty much. The whole "Win7 Sins" campaign reeks of this attitude, and so do most other materials on FSF website.

          It's even worse if you ever meet RMS in person. Three friends of mine, all Linux geeks, came to see him when he was in Moscow two years ago. However, they worked for a company which uses Linux in its proprietary products, and not all of the code they write for a living is released under GPL (or other "Fre

      • Nazis used various human byproducts such as hair and skin to make comfy pillows and various leather goods, I sure wouldn't use such products even if it was technically superiour to sleeping on rags with a stone for a pillow. Stallman foresaw the future in the moment of clear insight many years ago when he was unable to fix the laser printer. It was a life changing moment for him. You apathy saddens me, you have no values, no desire to change the world for the better.. I feel sorry for you.
        • by petrus4 (213815)

          You apathy saddens me, you have no values, no desire to change the world for the better.. I feel sorry for you.

          Actually, from my perspective it's exactly the opposite.

          I don't have a problem with Stallman because I'm a jaded, amoral sociopath. I have a problem with Stallman precisely because I'm concerned about the wellbeing of my fellow man.

          Richard Stallman is a cult leader, who wants to have control over as many other people as he can. The rest of the FSF's leadership also aren't much different in that regard, either; the group is a playground for megalomaniacs.

          The GPL was written in such a manner as to facilitat

  • With ... paranoia about malware and viruses at an all-time high, the time is right to help consumers ...

    So trusting someone standing in street corner handing out software is supposed to be...safe?

  • by MrKaos (858439)
    For letting us know with plenty of time to get involved.

One good reason why computers can do more work than people is that they never have to stop and answer the phone.

Working...