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Debian Software Linux

Debian Decides To Adopt Time-Based Release Freezes 79

Posted by Soulskill
from the regular-intervals dept.
frenchbedroom writes "The ongoing Debconf 9 meeting in Cáceres, Spain has brought a significant change to Debian's project management. The Debian project will now freeze development in December of every odd year, which means we can expect a new Debian release in the spring of every even year, starting with 'Squeeze' in 2010. Until now, development freezing was decided by the Debian release team. From the announcement: 'The project chose December as a suitable freeze date since spring releases proved successful for the releases of Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codenamed "Etch") and Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 ("Lenny"). Time-based freezes will allow the Debian Project to blend the predictability of time based releases with its well established policy of feature based releases. The new freeze policy will provide better predictability of releases for users of the Debian distribution, and also allow Debian developers to do better long-term planning. A two-year release cycle will give more time for disruptive changes, reducing inconveniences caused for users. Having predictable freezes should also reduce overall freeze time.' We previously discussed talks between Canonical and the Debian release team about fixed freeze dates."
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Debian Decides To Adopt Time-Based Release Freezes

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  • Previous way (Score:3, Interesting)

    by sleekware (1109351) * on Wednesday July 29, 2009 @11:36AM (#28867201)
    I've always liked Debian's way of doing their releases, it was unique and worked really well for them for awhile; I hope this new way works out for the best and mutually benefits both Debian and Ubuntu.
  • Re:Linux: Debian (Score:5, Interesting)

    by nosfucious (157958) on Wednesday July 29, 2009 @11:36AM (#28867203)

    And refering to Spring/Winter is too imprecise. It's currently (July) Winter in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Try refering to Quarter 1, Quatert 4, etc for times of the year.

    However nit picking aside, at least we shall now get some certainty in the releases of (probably) the worlds best distro.

    8-)

  • I like this (Score:3, Interesting)

    by tayhimself (791184) on Wednesday July 29, 2009 @11:38AM (#28867227)
    This is almost like an Ubuntu LTS release? I am very happy with Ubuntu LTS for my servers. I think this is a step in the right direction for debian, but I don't see why I would go with a Debian server as opposed to an Ubuntu one.

    Still thank you to the debian team for we depend on their hard work.

  • Re:Linux: Debian (Score:3, Interesting)

    by noundi (1044080) on Wednesday July 29, 2009 @11:53AM (#28867561)

    Second, limiting an OSS project to a time-based release cycle puts an artificial constraint on the development process. While it might be useful to encourage faster development in some cases, it is just as likely to force a new feature to be dropped at the last minute if it can't make it through the door in time.

    At the same time a release can be delayed for the opposite reason and you end up delaying the entire project due to some packages.

    The trick to avoiding your scenario and my scenario is by carefully picking the most appropriate intervals. Not too long between as this will drag out development leaving already stable and wanted features on hold for a longer time than necessary, and not too short leaving unstable features dropped or hurried out. The best way to do this would be to categorize your packages in different priorities, then gathering all the most important packages and calculating a suitable interval spectrum which is then used as the foundation for choosing the exact dates after having reviewed the less critical packages. Of course this won't please "everybody", but there is no solution for that. The only possibility is to please "as many as possible" in relation to their importance. To make it clear I'm personifying software packages when I refer to them as "everybody" and "as many as possible".

  • Re:Linux: Debian (Score:4, Interesting)

    by clang_jangle (975789) on Wednesday July 29, 2009 @11:59AM (#28867647) Journal

    ...limiting an OSS project to a time-based release cycle puts an artificial constraint on the development process. While it might be useful to encourage faster development in some cases, it is just as likely to force a new feature to be dropped at the last minute if it can't make it through the door in time.

    I definitely agree, however I expect this decision was driven by concerns that Debian's popularity with businesses [debian.org] might be threatened by Ubuntu. Pointy-haired types like to see "regular" release schedules, rather than "we'll release it when it's done".

    ...the small font used for the non-mainpage stories makes me read the story title as "Lesbian decides to adopt time-based release freezes".

    You might want to revisit your browser's font configuration then. I certainly would never depend on the font choices of web designers. :)

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