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Source Claims 240K Kindles Sold 176

Posted by kdawson
from the drm-and-all dept.
Naturalist writes "Exact data on (the Linux-powered) Kindle sales figures have been hard to come by. Amazon is notoriously tight-lipped about it, and although CEO Jeff Bezos did give some Kindle-related information back in July, the company has yet to break out how many readers it has sold to date. Now TechCrunch claims to have spoken to a source close to Amazon with direct knowledge of the company's sales figures. According to this unnamed source, Amazon has sold 240,000 Kindles to date, for an estimated hardware revenue between $86 million and $96 million; media sales would push the total above $100M." We've been following the Kindle since its launch nine months ago.
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Source Claims 240K Kindles Sold

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  • uhhh (Score:1, Informative)

    by larry bagina (561269)
    240M (as in million) is not the same as 240,000.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Pikoro (844299)
      Now if only they could "kindle" some interest in the darned things and make the media format open we might have something to be excited about.
      • I am usually keeping an eye on Linux projects that have a certain size, but this is honestly the first time I hear about this.

        • by tyrione (134248)

          I am usually keeping an eye on Linux projects that have a certain size, but this is honestly the first time I hear about this.

          Really? I suppose you're not an Amazon customer or just a peruser? The damn thing is on every page of their site. It's marketing all over the stripmall.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by robbiedo (553308)
        It is open enough with support for the Mobipocket software. Easily create supported books. I just bought the Sony PRS-505 because of just released firmware supporting EPUB and Adobe DRM. Really like the Sony reader.
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by SirGeek (120712)

          I have one too and I love it. The only negative is that if I use Calibre (the Linux software) I cannot use the Windows software (that comes with the ebook).

          It isn't that important but having the ability to sync with my Vista Laptop and my Linux desktop would be nice.

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I read it and assumed there was some sort of Three Kindles Per Child thing going on.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by bobdotorg (598873)

      No, No!

      They sold 240 MegaKindles, each of which is one seventh the physical size of the Library of Congress.

    • Funny thing is I nearly believed the 240k figure. I've barely heard a peep about the kindle since it launched.
  • by ForestGrump (644805) on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:02PM (#24474671) Homepage Journal

    You know you're reading slashdot when the number given is 1,000 times off.

    240,000 is not 240 million

    • by antek9 (305362) on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:04PM (#24474691)
      That's not M as in Million, it's M as in Mousand.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by acvh (120205)

      Bzzzt. For anyone who has worked in banking in the US, M means thousand, and MM means million. It bugs me to this day when people write 240M when they mean 240 million.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by NemosomeN (670035)
        You are correct, $250M is 250,000, and 250M Kindles is 250,000,000. Find a bank that will let me earn interest on a Kindle, and I'll use MM to count them in millions.
      • Interesting. The only knowledge I have of MM being millions is with natrual gas MMBTU

      • by mcsqueak (1043736) on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:44PM (#24475023)

        Bzzzt. For anyone who has worked in banking in the US, M means thousand, and MM means million. It bugs me to this day when people write 240M when they mean 240 million.

        M is also used in the advertising industry for thousands. For example, the cost of an ad buy can be given in thousands of impressions, known as CCM (cost per thousand).

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Lehk228 (705449)
          it's roman numerals, M is 1000
        • by ncc74656 (45571) *

          M is also used in the advertising industry for thousands. For example, the cost of an ad buy can be given in thousands of impressions, known as CCM (cost per thousand).

          I have a tube tester [alfter.us] for which the schematic [alfter.us] used "M" where we would now use "k" and "Meg" where we would now use "M." As you can see in the picture, it contains a roll chart of different types of tubes and the settings to use to determine whether they're any good. A few years ago, I tried to puzzle out a way to test tubes not listed in t

      • by Daimanta (1140543)

        Figures that an American institute uses outdated systems of counting and measuring instead of internationally defined ones.

        k = kilo is 1000
        M = mega is 1.000.000
        G = giga(jiga for bttf fans) is 1.000.000.000

        • by Kjella (173770)

          k = kilo is 1000
          M = mega is 1.000.000
          G = giga(jiga for bttf fans) is 1.000.000.000

          I think you would be most confused if someone abbriviated one billion dollars as "1G". It works for computers because we say "ten kilobytes" but for most people it'd be just as confusing that "ten thousand dollars" is "10k" or "10M" since noone uses the kilodollar. Both things are just a learned habit from an indirect source (SI prefixes or Latin).

          • by xaxa (988988)

            In the UK we sort-of use the kilopound (k£?). "It costs five kay" means it costs 5000, and could be written as £5k. We
            write "£5M" to mean £5000000, but it's always spoken as "million", not "em".

            Incidentally, Google tells me that (UK£ 5) [google.co.uk] * Boltzmann constant = 1.34958567 Ã--
            10-22 m2 kg s-2 K-1 U.S. Dollars. And there are lots of non-technical uses of "£5k" in the
            search results, whereas "$5k" is either UK sites or technical US sites.

      • by sunderland56 (621843) on Monday August 04, 2008 @09:48PM (#24475377)

        For anyone who has worked in banking in the US, M means thousand, and MM means million.

        The target audience of slashdot is geeks - specifically, engineering/computer geeks. This audience uses K for thousand.

        If you want to use M for thousand on bankerdot.org, sure, go for it.

      • by Kyro (302315) on Monday August 04, 2008 @09:52PM (#24475397)

        Is that why the U.S. banking system went belly-up?

      • by dave1g (680091)

        is it all of banking? I just thought it was us crazy people working at bloomberg.

      • by Ed Avis (5917)

        Hah, I never knew that. At least 'k' for thousand is unambiguous. (Those who prefer 1024 should use uppercase K, which is also Kelvin, though unlikely to be confused.)

        MM for million is not such a great idea; in scientific notation it would be a million million, and in Roman numerals 2000.

    • by bsDaemon (87307)

      The editors learned math from their Latin professors... what are you going to do?

    • It could pass million easily if Amazon wasn't stupid to make it USA/Canada(?) only.

      We, foreigners are the ones who sees absurd things like $20 book having $40 DHL posting price. Not Americans. I think they even send it free or something there.

      Move to digital, spend millions to research and make it USA only. Who to blame this time? Is there a MPAA/RIAA in book scene? Will they still whine about pirated e-books?

  • by Wordplay (54438) <geo@snarksoft.com> on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:04PM (#24474695)

    Sales figures look much more exciting in roman numerals!

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Jeff DeMaagd (2015)

      Is that what it's about? Who came up with the lousy idea of mixing modern and ancient number systems?

      • by kabocox (199019)

        Is that what it's about? Who came up with the lousy idea of mixing modern and ancient number systems?

        Abbreviations. I hate roman numerals with a passion, but I can see why some would use them as and abbreviation for a prefix. Of course, you could always use, 1e3 instead of 1000 or 1e6 for 1000000. Why isn't that more standard? Heck we were even taught that in junior high. I've yet to see numbers in that format on signs, ads, or random products around though.

        • I've seen "k" mean thousand and "M" mean million, which is from the modern SI measurement system. In my opinion, it's easier than dealing with exponents. And I've seen it used a lot in the US on billboards and ads, despite this country's unwillingness to embrace SI.

  • by frovingslosh (582462) on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:11PM (#24474757)
    for an estimated hardware revenue between $86 million and $96 million; media sales would push the total above $100M. What in the world is this saying? Lets take a figure lower than the midpoint and call the hardware sales $90 million (although one should be able to get it closer than within ten million dollars if you have the real number sold, since Amazon sells direct and the price is well known). That would only leave about $10 million or so for media sales. Are we really saying that people who shell out all of this money for the DRM encumbered Kindles are not spending more than about 12 percent of that price for stuff to read on it? Seems like a very expensive toy to buy if you're not going to actually use it, yet that's what the numbers here seem to be claiming.
    • by kesuki (321456)

      ah but that's the thing, you can read slashdot on the kindle, I'm not sure if it's free or not, they like to charge $9.99 for things, but you are paying $400 for a device that has much less expensive hardware, and doesn't charge the end user for their bandwidth, despite using cellular data service...

      "More than 350 top blogs from the worlds of business, technology, sports, entertainment, and politics, including BoingBoing, Slashdot, TechCrunch, ESPN's Bill Simmons, The Onion, Michelle Malkin, and The Huffing

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Nyeerrmm (940927)
        Usually you can get blogs delivered automatically for about $1-2/month, or you can access them via the internet app for free, and its not too much more difficult if you set up google reader or something like that. Magazines like Time and Newsweek are $1.50/month.
  • Great Title (Score:5, Funny)

    by EdIII (1114411) * on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:11PM (#24474759)

    When I read the 240M title I wondered where my Kindle was in the house and why I could not remember even buying it :)

  • by darjen (879890) on Monday August 04, 2008 @08:14PM (#24474789)

    If I was an investor in Amazon, I would be upset that they are not releasing any numbers. I would certainly no longer hold a position in them. It looks pretty small when you think about how many devices Apple and Nintendo are selling.

    • by dgatwood (11270) on Monday August 04, 2008 @09:00PM (#24475111) Journal

      Put in perspective, if the numbers I'm seeing on websites about iPhone sales are correct, this puts the kindle somewhere on the order of 10-20 days worth of iPhone sales.... Yeah, not that great. Book reading on an existing device is useful and a lot of people will do it. Buying a special piece of hardware whose primary purpose is book reading... definitely a niche market, particularly when it costs about twice as much as an iPhone (carrier subsidized) that does so much more....

      • by JakeD409 (740143) on Monday August 04, 2008 @09:10PM (#24475179)
        The main advantage of the Kindle over the iPhone is actually the fact that it's not a phone; do you realize how high you jump when you're sitting in a quiet place deeply into a horror novel, and right at the scariest part, the damn thing RINGS at you?!
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        Welcome to Slashdot, where if you can't be the absolute best at everything, you might as well not bother at all.

      • The magic pricepoint is $50-$100. They would be wiser to make the Kindle as cheap as possible, then charge a bit extra for the download if necessary. The bandwidth to transmit a compressed book can't be that much. But $360 for the Kindle? No way.
        • by dgatwood (11270)

          I was thinking $40-60, but yes. Actually, IMHO, it tries to do too much with the whole EVDO data thing, resulting in a device that's overly feature-packed and expensive hardware-wise for a device whose software basically just lets you read electronic books. It's like putting a Cummins diesel in a golf cart. If they had made it a USB mass storage device at around a $50 price point, it would have been a much bigger hit, I think.

          • by LaughingCoder (914424) on Tuesday August 05, 2008 @07:28AM (#24478039)

            it tries to do too much with the whole EVDO data thing

            Obviously you have had no experience with a Kindle. The EVDO is the "special sauce". I have owned one for 8 months and I love it. I use it every day. I am reading (buying) about 3 books a month (each book is about $6, best-sellers are more like $10, but I usually wait until they "age" a bit). Plus I shut off my newspaper ($30/month) and get it delivered to my Kindle instead ($10/month), so in the end my monthly outlay for reading materials is unchanged while I am essentially getting 3 books/month for free. So from that perspective, my $400 initial outlay (I was an early adopter before the price drop) will be paid for in 33 months. Anyhow, what makes this device really attractive to me is the (free) wireless. Being able to browse their book collection (which is substantial), download and read a few chapters (for free) anywhere, anytime, is extremely addicting. And being able to buy the book and be reading it in less than 30 seconds is a convenience I've grown to "need". In the morning when I turn it on, there is my newspaper - I don't have to boot the PC, connect the USB, do the "syncing" thing, it's just delivered automatically. Built in web-browsing for checking the occassional baseball score or my email is also a big plus. Yes, the hardware is a bit clunky (too many next page buttons - there is no place to hold the thing), and the industrial design looks like something from the 80s, but the battery lasts a good long time (many days if you turn off the wireless and just use it as a book) and the display is very easy on the eyes. Never having to tether to a computer is a really big deal for me - don't knock it until you've tried it.

      • by jwiegley (520444) on Monday August 04, 2008 @10:42PM (#24475731)

        Buying a special piece of hardware whose primary purpose is book reading... definitely a niche market

        Yeah, but... I've been on Holiday in London for the past month. I take the tube (when it's actually running) everywhere and I've got to say the US$700 I spent on my iRex iLiad and about US$100 worth of novels has been a godsend on the train. The batteries last all day, bright light only improves the readability and much more portable than a laptop.

        It may be a niche market but it has potential. Unfortunately, the only way this potential is going to be achieved is if the corporate players get their collective heads out of their ass and standardize on one, decent, open, portable format.

        They also have to port previous works into an electronic format. Try to find Robert Ludlum's books on mobipocket format. You can't, at least not the pre-death publications. Dale Brown? "Oh yeah, let's pick every other book to publish." What idiot does that. If I'm going paperless then I'm going paperless.

        DRM is tolerable but there's no reason you can't have an open format that supports DRM.

        The people that dreamed up these different formats have done such a poor job it's not funny. PDB don't support different typefaces. PDF's don't reflow. HTML isn't going to support DRM and you need to zip to capture multiple files. Kindle isn't compatible with anybody else, lit is closed. While I find mobipocket tolerable try accurately converting any of the others to mobipocket. They're all just a kludge. Concepts of "paragraph", "chapter", "lists" and "Table" all are meaningless in these formats and essential concepts for reflowable layout. Basically, a quick experience in trying to convert formats and you will quickly understand that the people who designed these "formats" know nothing about capturing and encoding information.

        Until they get a clue eBooks are dead in the water. (And I like mine, that should tell you something.)

        • The problems I have with ebook readers are:
          1. I could buy a lot of paperbacks for the same money.
          2. There's no restriction on the books I can read. First the book has to have been scanned and then it needs to be available in a format the ebook reader understand. In contrast to a book which just has to be in a language I understand.
          3. I don't mind leaving read novels behind when I've been on holiday in order to save weight.
          4. I can lend books to family and friends.
          5. Books don't need batteries.

          In contrast I can onl

        • by kabocox (199019)

          Until they get a clue eBooks are dead in the water. (And I like mine, that should tell you something.)

          I love the concept and really can't wait to get one myself. My problems is their wanting me to spend a $300-400 on a single purpose device that usually only reads their chosen format. Sure the display is great and the batteries last a long time, but I'd rather spend a few more for a laptop that can read and convert nearly any format that I happen to have. When I can spend $30-50 and get a brand new one and

        • by joebok (457904)

          I bought a Kindle last week - after months and months of thinking about it. I have read eBooks on many many devices - from my trusty old Palm III to Clie's to iPAQs and now the Kindle.

          As a reading experience - the Kindle blows them all out of the water. I'm pretty sure any eInk device would - it is great. Battery life, readability - awesome.

          The reason I dithered so long was the DRM issue that has plagued eBooks from the start. What finally brought me over is that Kindle format is MobiPocket and it is po

      • "Put in perspective, if the numbers I'm seeing on websites about iPhone sales are correct, this puts the kindle somewhere on the order of 10-20 days worth of iPhone sales"

        iPhones sales are slower then they would be do to very limited supply. Apple has plans to ramp up iPhone production to 800,000 units per week. This means every few days Apple will sell Amazon's entire run of Kindles.

        I think the problem with Kindle is that it is a single purpose device. All it does is read books. And not even all books o

      • Check out the comments by Steve Pendergrast of ereader.com at some cranky blogger's site [munseys.com].

        You're not seeing the data I'm seeing, like the dozens of people writing me and saying they dropped plans to buy kindle as soon as they saw ereader running on their iphone. The iphone is cutting the legs off of kindle sales even as we speak.

    • If I was an investor in Amazon, I would be upset that they are not releasing any numbers. I would certainly no longer hold a position in them. It looks pretty small when you think about how many devices Apple and Nintendo are selling.

      As an investor, why would you care at all about how many units sold? It doesn't matter if they sold 240 or 240 million, it only matters how much they were sold for, how much it cost to sell them, and what that means to their overall cost and revenue structures.

      Knowing that someone has sold X widgets at a sell price of $Y tells you absolutely nothing. Knowing that someone has sold $X in product with an average profit margin of Y% with a cost of $Z to run the company is helpful information.

      Take a look at Amaz

  • TechCrunch claims to have spoken to a source close to Amazon with direct knowledge of the company's sales figures.

    .

    My friend talked to his brother who knows a guy And said He has all the answers.

    What the heck kind of Journalism is that?!..

  • I read slightly higher numbers from a very reputable source:

    âoeDear Customers,â begins the message from Bezos. âoeWe continue to be astonished at your insatiable hunger for Kindle: our earth-shattering nirvana delivery system.â âoeTo date, we have sold more than three hundred Kindles for every man, woman, and child on planet Earth,â the note continued, âoeThatâ(TM)s over two trillion Kindles in just six months.â

    Amazon: Kindle is the greatest! Seriously, buy one [nakedloon.com]

    • Whoa, copy-paste madness. It looked good in the preview.

      Let's try that again:

      "Dear Customers," begins the message from Bezos. "We continue to be astonished at your insatiable hunger for Kindle: our earth-shattering nirvana delivery system."

      "To date, we have sold more than three hundred Kindles for every man, woman, and child on planet Earth," the note continued, "That's over two trillion Kindles in just six months."

  • Especially when Bezos himself probably bought about 239,990 of them.
  • ugh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by bcrowell (177657) on Monday August 04, 2008 @09:42PM (#24475341) Homepage
    It's fine that a lot of people seem to like the thing. Reasons I'm not interested:
    • $360 is way too much.
    • DRM.
    • The methods for importing PDF files sound like a hassle.
    • The TOU say you can't sell or give away your books.
    • There are only 145,000 books available. That sounds like a lot, but it's really not.

    I can see how it could come in handy if you're on vacation and want to travel light, but IMO that's not nearly enough to overcome the negatives. I'll probably get an e-book reader in 2030 or something. There's no rush. First I want to see someone get it right.

    • by jeiler (1106393)
      I'm surprised no one's come up with a "jailbreak" for it. A quick search on "Kindle hacks" shows that the firmware seems to be accessible, and one would hazard that replacing the DRM-laden reader with a free reader would not be excessively difficult.
      • Well, the DRM is on the files isn't it? Your allowed to load whatever files you want (so DRM free pdfs, txts, rtfs or whatever), its just that the stuff you buy from Amazon has DRM on it. If such is the case, a Kindle Hack to remove the DRM components on the reader itself doesn't make sense.
        • by jeiler (1106393)
          My bad--for some reason I thought the Kindle would only allow the proprietary files from Amazon. Time to go to bed.
          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            In a way, I'm not sure you are wrong. It was my understanding that in order to display a PDF for example, it had to first be converted to their format.

            Anybody know if this is true?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Nyeerrmm (940927)

      I like your first statement. I must say, as a Kindle owner I perfectly understand your point of view. Here's the way I see it

      1. The cost was fine for me, but I'm also a young guy with a decent job so I've got some disposable income.
      3. PDF's can't transfer well because of the size of the screen... I do wish there were an easy way to read technical papers on it though, I dont see it until the E-ink comes down in price and improves durability though.
      4. Again, I've got adequate money right now, if its a book

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by symbolic (11752)

      You forgot one - for a modern device in a culture that is bent on style, the kindle is quite hideous. iPhone, iPod, iMac, etc...though I'm not a big Apple fan (I do own an iPod), the style factor is why these things sell. The Kindle looks like it's still a prototype.

      • by Blakey Rat (99501)

        You forgot one - for a modern device in a culture that is bent on style, the kindle is quite hideous. iPhone, iPod, iMac, etc...though I'm not a big Apple fan (I do own an iPod), the style factor is why these things sell. The Kindle looks like it's still a prototype.

        I think the Kindle has a really slick, cutting-edge look!

        On a related note, I just woke up from a 20-year coma; can somebody tell me how to get this "Amazon" thing on my Commodore 64 so I can buy some bad-ass New Kids on the Block cassettes?

    • 145,000 available books within a year of the Kindle's release isn't too shabby, IMO -- better certainly than any other e-book reader that has come to market. And that number isn't counting all the stuff you can get from Project Gutenberg and other non-Amazon sources.

      As for traveling light, I'm currently reading Cryptonomicon and next up will be Neal Stephenson's new book or Peter Hamilton's Night's Dawn Trilogy. Amazon has the whole trilogy (how many pages is that?) in one "volume." It sells for less than

    • I agree with all your points, really, but one thing that would convince me to buy a Kindle soon would be if they worked a deal with SafariBooks to let me access my safari subscription via the kindle for no extra money. To be able to get all those technical books in a convenient format would be a game changer for me. I'd buy a Kindle in a heartbeat. O'Reilley has been trying to work something with them, but so far they are only offering certain books in PDF format if you buy the book. To be fair not all the

    • by gad_zuki! (70830)

      I also dislike this device. I would salivate if they:

      1. Got rid of EVDO and just gave me wifi

      2. Lowered the price to $100 or so.

      3. Let me easily copy PDFs, cbr, etc.

      I understand the appeal of an EVDO device that automagically downloads books, but thats a small niche at this price. I should not have to pay 400 dollars just to get started. Also, I'm not an image conscious person, but christ, that this is ugly. It looks like a daily planner from Sharper Imager circa 1986.

    • Yeah. I bought an Asus Eee 900 recently for $440, and read one of the Tor free PDFs on it. It made a nice reader. Telling the PDF reader to rotate into landscape and turning it on the side puts one page at a time on the screen, and you get none of the refresh issues you have with eInk, and all on a device that is light and has good battery life. I took it with me on vacation and not only used it as a reader, but also to check google maps for directions to restaurants, etc. The only downside was the scr

  • by DeathSquid (937219) on Monday August 04, 2008 @10:58PM (#24475837)

    Books are cheap in the U.S. and people have a lot of room to store them, so Kindle is definitely a niche product in its domestic market. However, in other countries books are expensive and often space is at a premium. Kindle offers huge advantages, and would be wildly successful in these markets.

    How does Amazon respond to this market need? They refuse point blank to sell kindle devices or media to anyone outside North America.

    Sure, whispernet is NA only. But a USB connection works just as well...

    What sane company ignores its largest potential market? And when it does, the writing is on the wall. If I was a shareholder, I would be livid.

    So the only question that remains is why Kindle is being set up for failure? Simple incompetence? Xenophobia? Or something more subtle?

    • by dargaud (518470)

      However, in other countries books are expensive and often space is at a premium.

      Exactly. I give away all my books after reading them because I have no space to store them. Add this to the fact that I read in english in a non-english speaking country, it adds up in terms of postage stamps to get them shipped here. I've been waiting for years for a good e-ink device. I have high hopes for the next version of the Kindle...

    • Correction; they refuse to sell the devices outside of the USA. I can't buy one up here in Canada.

      There's lots wrong with Amazon's marketing strategy; some kinds of books in the US are expensive, such as text books, and much of this cost comes from their limited runs. Publishing these books to the Kindle would eliminate much of the cost associated with publishing overhead. This would also stop poor students from having to lug a hundred pounds of textbooks around with them.

      Textbooks are also a perfect cho

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by gilgongo (57446)

      I'll take a guess that it's nothing to do with any of that. The name "Kindle" gives you a clue if you know anything about the historical relationship between publishers and distributors. Burning books. Basically, publishers hate (and I mean hate) distributors. Not only does distribution means high costs, it means massive restrictions on what publishers can publish. Poetry? Philosophy? Not a hope in hell: if it doesn't sell within a week, those tiny shelves need to be stacked with some crap that does. Lowest

    • So the only question that remains is why Kindle is being set up for failure? Simple incompetence? Xenophobia? Or something more subtle?

      Yeah, xenophobia, I'm sure that's it. Amazon would rather not have any non-American mitts on the Kindle because ... because what, the board is made up of folks who wouldn't be able to sleep at night knowing that Australians or Brazilians or Italians were using their precious Kindle? My god, the very thought of it must make them quake!

      Don't you think that Amazon is salivating at the prospect of cornering the international e-book market? Sure, it may be tiny now but that's a market that's only going to exp

    • So they sell $100M in product and that's a failure to you? Are you fucking retarded? These unofficial numbers would make it the most successful eBook reader in the U.S. by far.

      As for selling outside the U.S. ...that's complicated. First there's the whispernet issue which isn't available everywhere and may be cost prohibitive for them to acquire in many countries, then there's the contracts they have with the publishers.

      It's just not that simple. I'm sure Amazon would love to sell it everywhere but things

  • It is overpriced, underwhelming performance, and absolutely the coolest damned thing Ive bought in ten years. When I can fight off the kids over the rights to pry it from my wife's hands, its just a blast to use. Ive now read more Terry Pratchett on the Kindle than in dead tree form. And the kids find all these great direct-to-electronic format books from micropublishers. OK so it didnt live up to my plan to download all my PDF tech manuals. And it may only have a 100k books available, but they seem to be t

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