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Slackware 12.0 Released 286

Posted by kdawson
from the that's-two-ahead-of-os-x dept.
Matt writes "Straight from our good friend and colleague in the fight for quality distributions, Mr. Patrick Volkerding, comes a brand-new and eagerly-awaited release of Slackware, version 12. HAL automount, KDE 3.5.7 and XFCE 4.4.1, Xorg 7.2, 2.6 kernels as far as the eye can see, oodles of updated applications and utilities, and hardware support for just about anything under the sun. Get it here. Enjoy! I know I will."
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Slackware 12.0 Released

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  • Am I the only one? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by wawannem (591061) on Monday July 02, 2007 @09:14PM (#19724685) Homepage
    It is a bit hard to jump back into Slackware... The long hiatus a while back left me seeking other distros which I have stayed loyal to.
    • by SyniK (11922)
      Yes and no.
      Yes, every extended hiatus has me trying other distros to fill in the gaps (new gcc, new kde, new X, new distro-specific widget, etc)...
      But I always go back to slackware-current once the gap is filled.
    • by DynaSoar (714234) on Monday July 02, 2007 @11:51PM (#19726283) Journal
      > It is a bit hard to jump back into Slackware... The long hiatus a while back left me seeking other distros which I have stayed loyal to.

      No, you're probably not the only one. However, that opinion is the opposite as that of Jason1729 below, who states he gave it up due to too many updates and fixes, and he's probably not the only one to feel that way either. Between the two, Patrick is probably running at pretty much the right speed:

      From: Patrick J. Volkerding (bf703@cleveland.Freenet.Edu)
            Subject: ANNOUNCE: Slackware Linux 1.00
            Newsgroups: comp.os.linux
            Date: 1993-07-16 17:21:20 PST

        The Slackware Linux distribution (v. 1.00) is now available for
        anonymous FTP.....

      12 versions in 14 years, plus revisions between. All under his guidance. Most would have abandoned the effort sooner and with fewer releases, and probably due to doing so many in that time. Hell, most would have given up rather than rewrite it all in order to switch libraries.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        12 versions in 14 years
        4 + 1 = 7. It's true! Pat says so. ;)
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Phroggy (441)
          Yeah, but:
          3.5
          3.6
          4.0
          7.0
          7.1
          8.0
          8.1
          9.0
          9.1
          10.0
          10.1
          10.2
          11.0
          12.0

          (I don't know how many releases there were before 3.5.)
    • by d12v10 (1046686) on Monday July 02, 2007 @11:57PM (#19726325)
      Oh my lord, did you just end a sentence with a preposition?
  • by drpimp (900837) on Monday July 02, 2007 @09:20PM (#19724751) Journal
    Once you go Slack, you never go back!

    Well that used to be my motto, at least for my servers. But I really just got tired of having to compile things that I could not get with slackpkg or slapt. I have switched to Debian for my servers I alleviated my headaches with compiling apps (those not included or available). Mind you if you needed something that WAS available with slackpkg or slapt then it was a great system. And even still a better system to have a locked down tight server. I would rank it up there with Gentoo in certain aspects (of course not installation).

    Since I will probably quest to install Slack again someday, does anyone know if it comes with a GUI installer yet? I have not installed since Slack 10 so maybe my question is obviously dated, but it is a valid one at that!
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by PenGun (794213)
      Yeah ... but it's a curses GUI. Same as always.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by person132 (986809)
      Still text based, AFAIK. No reason to go graphical.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Megane (129182)

      Since 3.6 or so, it's really the only Linux I've used. But it helped that I was already a Mac user and had no interest in X Windows. In fact, Xfree86 setup was so much crap back then because it wanted to create custom modelines (instead of using VESA standard modes) which would never work right if you didn't have a big name brand monitor and video card, so I avoided using anything but text mode for Linux.

      One of the reasons I used Slackware in the first place was that it was basically the last distribution

    • by richlv (778496)
      compiling your own packages also got a little bit harder with removal of checkinstall for slack 12.
      it didn't work quite well with recent coreutils.

      hopefully, checkinstall will get updated and included back, but in case somebody just wants it to get working fast, replacing 'chmod' from slack 11 made it so much happier.

      changelog recommended monitoring http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/ [asic-linux.com.mx], so that's probably something i'll do for some time :)
    • But I really just got tired of having to compile things that I could not get with slackpkg or slapt

      Often as not, converting .RPMs works fine.

      Since I will probably quest to install Slack again someday, does anyone know if it comes with a GUI installer yet?

      I don't think that's high on Pat's probability list (wasn't as of 11, doubt it's in this one). On the up side, it's probably the same as you remember, so it shouldn't cause you any problems.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by m3gatr0nX (1066120)

      Once you go Slack, you never go back!

      I'd have to agree with that statement. I've gotten too used to the Slack way of doing things and really appreciate its simplicity and the fact that I can keep it nice and lightweight. Ubuntu / Fedora / Suse are all nice, but I find them way too bloated for my needs on the desktop and as a server. Slack as a server works best. Sure you'll have to compile a lot of packages from source, but that's the only way you can be sure the software is configured correctly for

  • by bersl2 (689221) on Monday July 02, 2007 @09:21PM (#19724761) Journal
    I have work to do tonight! Don't make me choose between that and upgrading to 12.0!
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by pilbender (925017)
      AAAAAHHHH Damn it! I was thinking the *exact* same thing. I have to just put it out of my mind because I've got code to release tomorrow and we're down on devs by 60% :-(

      I'm going to take a stand. I'm going to take charge. I'm *not* going to let the Slackware upgrade dominate my thoughts! I will fight the urge! I will write my code so I can keep my job and my house and my wife. I will make the right choice.

      There! I don't feel any better and it doesn't make it okay. I still want to upgrade my Slack
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Skapare (16644)

      Call in sick. You know it will make you sick if you can't get your Slack.

  • The problem with slackware i found was i had to find and compile every single stupid dependency out there. Some people might find it "l33t" but i would suggest they haven't had enough experience with that kind of crud to be completely over it.

    if it still lacks a ports or packaging system that allows easy to update packages and conflict resolution, it's not worth the time.

  • by tgd (2822) on Monday July 02, 2007 @10:04PM (#19725295)
    Cleaning out my garage a week or two ago I was going through an old box and ended up tossing a set of Slackware A floppies... That was such a refreshing change from downloading a boot disk and bootstrapping a system starting with compiling GCC.

    I know its only peripherally related to the article, but man. V12 of Slackware? Time has flown, and things sure have changed.

    • by colmore (56499)
      Cleaning out my garage a week or two ago I was going through an old box and ended up tossing a set of Slackware A floppies... That was such a refreshing change from downloading a boot disk and bootstrapping a system starting with compiling GCC.

      well between the four digit user ID, and the old timer war stories, what are you up to these days? just chasing the rest of us off of your lawn, cane in fist?
      • by Dicky (1327)
        Bah, kids of today!

        And yes, until I emigrated last year, meaning a major home clear-out, I also had old floppy boxes with stacks of a*, d*, n* disks in them. I'll have to grab me a Slack 12, although I had been thinking of trying Gentoo next, for a sheer seat-of-pants setup...

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Nimey (114278)
      It hasn't been that many versions. Patrick skipped from v4 to v7 because IIRC Redhat at the time was v7, and so was Mandrake.
  • To my new hardware! At least I was still burning it in and hadnt put too much into configuring it yet. Time to flush and reload once again!

    tm

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by pilbender (925017)
      What the heck!? Slackware makes it very easy to upgrade versions. I haven't had to do a fresh install on *any* computers once I put Slackware on them initially. There are a couple of docs included on the distro to help with upgrading. You should follow those and learn how to do it. You can also tar up Slack and move it to a different hard disk. No need to ever reinstall Slackware.

      I highly recommend building confidence in the upgrade process. This way you will never have to worry about reconfiguring y
      • by Richy_T (111409)
        Why bother upgrading a fresh install? It's not like you're throwing any work away and it's just inviting unexpected problems.

        Rich
  • but I thought Patrick was dying?

    **duck**

    Seriously though, anyone know?
  • I used slackware on my desktop for many years (I started with 2.3 and kernel 1.0.8). A few years ago I decided it was just too much trouble, between regularly updating the kernal for security patchs (involving recompiling, redoing lilo, etc) and other system maintence, I was spending more time administering my system than using it.

    Are things that different with linux now? (I'm not bashing slackware here, I tried many distros and always found slackware to be the best)
  • Back then, they touted Linux as having 50,000 users!
  • by deimios666 (1040904) on Tuesday July 03, 2007 @01:01AM (#19726779)
    If you learn Ubuntu, you know Ubuntu. If you learn Slackware, you know Linux.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by fractoid (1076465)
      Any time I have to spend f$%king with my OS instead of playing games, reading web pages, checking and answering my email is wasted. It's this spending-time-on-your-OS-is-your-ultimate-goal mentality that's holding Linux back from more mainstream adoption. The perfect OS would 'just work', let me run applications, and not require my attention in any way.
      • by phiwum (319633)
        Any time I have to spend f$%king with my OS instead of playing games, reading web pages, checking and answering my email is wasted. It's this spending-time-on-your-OS-is-your-ultimate-goal mentality that's holding Linux back from more mainstream adoption. The perfect OS would 'just work', let me run applications, and not require my attention in any way.

        Then choose a different distro. The tinkerer who wants to learn about Linux can use Slackware while you use something else.

        What's the problem?
      • by Richy_T (111409)
        Fortunately, the obsession some seem to have with Linux achieving mainstream adoption is not holding it back from getting serious work done.

        Rich
    • by Lumpy (12016)
      Incorrect.

      If you know slaclware you know linux and almost all System V based unix systems. You even know enough about solaris to be dangerous and look like you know what you are doing.

      Slack teaches you things that the others dont and there is one tiny difference between slack and the others.

      you can grab a random source package, untar; ./configure; make; make install
      and most of the time it will work. Under CendOS, fedora, ubuntu and others that is not always the case. Many time very useful but old and no
  • by CCFreak2K (930973)
    Really, it was great. I even submitted the Slackware 11 release story. I got turned to it right when 10 came out because I wanted to try Linux. The problem was, I got tired of spending hours configuring everything. For example, getting everything ACPI-related on my laptop was possible, but getting something like the lid to work was a real pain because I had to A) figure out what was wrong (which would entail finding people with similar problems usually with DISsimilar distros), B) find the necessary softwar
  • by rg3 (858575) on Tuesday July 03, 2007 @03:40AM (#19727655) Homepage
    First off, excuse me if I'm going a bit off-topic here. While the Slackware team was preparing version 12.0 I worked on a new package/update manager for Slackware, called SlackRoll [sourceforge.net]. I can't think of a better place to mention it than the Slackware 12.0 announcement thread in Slashdot, because it's probably going to be read by hundreds if not thousands of Slackware users.

    One of the defining points of Slackware is the small set of official packages it features. On top of that, the native package management tools don't track depencencies and don't have the notion of remote repositories. All together, this doesn't adapt very well to users who want to try new software all the time and spend their days installing and removing packages. Doing that is hard with a vanilla Slackware, so people have created tools like swaret or slapt-get to simplify the process and be able to use remote repositories like the one at linuxpackages.net and similar, where they can download many unofficial packages that sometimes include dependency information slapt-get can use. I don't think that's "right". Let me explain. It's cool that Slackware is flexible enough to let you do that, but your system ends up in a very chaotic state after some time, in my experience (specially if you use slackware-current instead of slackware-stable). You can manage your system that way if you want, and maybe you're careful enough to do it, but it's very hard. That type of users would probably be happier with Arch, Gentoo or even Debian (I never understood the rivalry between Slackware and Debian; I've used both and both are great in their styles).

    Patrick Volkerding probably thinks that way too, because he doesn't include those tools in Slackware. If I recall correctly, swaret was included for some time but in the end it was removed. He includes, however, a tool called slackpkg, which is clearly targetted at more "classic" Slackware users, because it lets you use one official mirror and manage systems composed of official packages for the most part, and includes some mechanisms to let you have some custom packages without being a headache (maybe downloaded from linuxpakages.net or slacky.eu or built with your own slackbuild scripts that you can also download from sites like slackbuilds.org). The problem is that slackpkg is slow (it's a big shell script), and doesn't let you track many corner events that happen frequently in slackware-current, so that's the starting point of slackroll.

    Think of it like slackpkg on steroids. I specifically designed it to detect situations which are frequent in slackware-current, but it can also be used for slackware-stable without any problems. By design, it can:
    • Detect packages being added to the remote tree.
    • Detect upgrades and reverts.
    • Detect packages being deleted from the remote tree.
    • Give you the chance of choosing which package version to install if there are several available (main, extra, testing, etc).
    • Be told which packages are not official.
    • Detect when an unofficial package gets an official version.
    • Detect when a package with a custom build is removed from the remote tree.

    And more stuff. Like I said, slackpkg on steroids. It's much faster, uses less bandwidth, detects more events and it's probably more flexible. I'm pretty satisfied with the result, so I wanted to invite people to read the program's webpage and try it if you think you fall into the target audience. It would be fine if I was the only user, but more eyes mean less bugs and I think it's always a shame when you create a tool which you are proud of and SourceForge only shows 20 downloads because people do not actually know it exists. Its main problem is that the initial setup may be more complex than usual and you need to read a bit more to know how it works. Howev

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by kv9 (697238)

      I can't think of a better place to mention it than the Slackware 12.0 announcement thread in Slashdot, because it's probably going to be read by both Slackware users.

      there, fixed that for you.

    • by neersign (956437)
      it was interesting reading about your project. I must say that I was personally hoping to see slackware package management emulate FreeBSD Ports. I haven't used slackware in a year now and I left it because I was getting tired of creating my own slackbuild scripts. I am amazed that slackbuilds.org is still running and still current. When I was using slackware (for 3 months or so last year), I hung out in #slackware and I came up with the idea for the central repository. I stayed long enough to give my o
  • because I just installed 11.0 last friday and spent a while customizing it on this decTOP/PIC (366MHz with no DMA support in the default kernel takes a while to compile linux 2.6)
    • by Bandman (86149)
      You can change the target and compile it on a faster box.

      (or just use the kernel you just compiled, since you know it works)
  • Ah, Slackware. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by jnelson4765 (845296)
    I'm working for a company that had Slackware as its primary server OS. Until I showed how much time it took to operate and maintain.

    Slackware is great for many things - single-purpose machines, getting that old P1 running, etc. It has a few major flaws that make it unusable in businessland:

    1: too #$%) hard for a new admin. It requires a lot of arcane skills to get set up properly - skills that don't come cheap, and are hard to find in the marketplace.

    2: No dependency management. Debian- and RH-based dis
    • by Bandman (86149)
      You make very good points. Strangely enough, only one of them is among the reasons I'm moving our servers from Slack.

      We need commercial support for some of the drivers we're going to be using for our fiber array, and Slack isn't among the choices (big surprise). RHEL is, and that will solve another problem that we've been running into.

      There is no possible way to do a universal login / user management system with Slackware without rolling your own solution. And it is SO aggrivating.

      I'm tired of telling my us

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