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SuSE Businesses Software Linux

openSUSE Survey Results Online 173

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the liars-damn-liars-and-statisticians dept.
apokryphos writes "openSUSE have announced that the results from the openSUSE survey (PDF) are now online. The survey was live for almost 3 months and more than 27,000 users participated, making it one of the largest Linux distribution surveys ever."
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openSUSE Survey Results Online

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  • Why? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hemogoblin (982564) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:44AM (#18999087)
    I RTFA and even RTF-PDF, but I still don't know the point of this survey. For what purpose was it administered? As far as I can tell, it simply collected the characteristics of people who use openSUSE. Is some organization going to be using these results for something?
  • Luckily (Score:5, Funny)

    by Propaganda13 (312548) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:47AM (#18999097)
    OpenSuse user base doesn't reflect the world. Otherwise, only 2% of the population would be female.
    • by tftp (111690)
      It is almost that bad in China.
    • by houghi (78078)
      If they would talk to me, I would happily agree with those odds, but in the real world, none come down to my moms basement where I live.
  • Tools used (Score:1, Troll)

    by tftp (111690)
    It's always interesting to check PDF properties; this survey was printed from Mozilla on an Apple box. I just wonder why Novell could not spend 0.5 [wo]man-hour to actually make it nice.
    • t's always interesting to check PDF properties

      A perverse habit that I share. My guess is that only people familiar with desktop publishing would get what they're looking at, but it's worth pointing out that while PDFs can contain interesting information, the information is never as interesting (or incriminating) as what we'd typically get from folks who "publish" Word documents, employees of Microsoft included.

      this survey was printed from Mozilla on an Apple box. I just wonder why Novell could not spend 0.
  • KDE vs Gnome (Score:4, Insightful)

    by eklitzke (873155) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:48AM (#18999109) Homepage
    I know that Suse has long been a KDE-oriented distribution, but I was still surprised to see such a high percentage of respondents who used it. When I started using Linux several years ago, it seemed that most users were running KDE, but lately with the huge success of Gnome and Gnome-origented distributions, I was expecting to see a higher adoption rate of Gnome (yes, even among Suse users).

    Also, did anyone else think it was weird that among all the questions asked, they neglected to ask what geographic region respondents were from?
    • Re:KDE vs Gnome (Score:4, Insightful)

      by thatshawnguy (1096811) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:52AM (#18999145)

      Also, did anyone else think it was weird that among all the questions asked, they neglected to ask what geographic region respondents were from?
      Because "In my parent's basement" can't be found on a map.
    • Re:KDE vs Gnome (Score:5, Interesting)

      by WindBourne (631190) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:57AM (#18999181) Journal
      Considering that GNOME is the default on suse, it is amazing. It looks like the more that the distros push GNOME, they more that they shoot themselves in the foot. Hopefully, this survey will stop that crap, but I am guessing that Novell will disregard this part.
      • Re:KDE vs Gnome (Score:5, Informative)

        by sjbcfh (611594) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @01:23AM (#18999331)
        Considering that GNOME is the default on suse, it is amazing.

        Gnome is the default selection for SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop, but only in that the radio button for Gnome is preselected, rather than that for KDE. KDE is still the default selection for openSUSE.

      • by drgonzo59 (747139)
        the more that the distros push GNOME, they more that they shoot themselves in the foot

        Ubuntu's Gnome foot (Gnome logo pun intended) looks pretty good so far.

        I was an avid KDE user, used it exclusively on Redhat, Mandriva then SuSE. When I switched to Ubuntu, I promptly added the Kubuntu metapackage to get my KDE back. But then, after playing with a 1001 configuration preferences in KDE I wanted to revert back some settings, it took me a very long time to find them.

        Eventually I came to the seemingly p

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by phrasebook (740834)
          But then, after playing with a 1001 configuration preferences in KDE I wanted to revert back some settings, it took me a very long time to find them.

          Name them. Go on, I dare you.

          Refer to one of my earlier posts [slashdot.org] if you need some help.
          • by Curien (267780)
            The option that always pisses me off is the one that allows you to change from 'single-click activate' to 'double-click activate'. I end up looking through all the various "Look & Feel" panels to no avail. (Yes, I know where the option is, but I have to hunt for it every time.)

            The main problem, to me, is that KDE doesn't differentiate between per-user and system-wide System Settings, but the labels imply that it does. "Personal" and "Look & Feel" are obviously per-user, and "Computer Administration"
            • The option that always pisses me off is the one that allows you to change from 'single-click activate' to 'double-click activate'. I end up looking through all the various "Look & Feel" panels to no avail. (Yes, I know where the option is, but I have to hunt for it every time.)

              It took me 10 seconds to find, even though I didn't know it was there. How? Open KControl. Type "double" in the search bar. Select the first suggestion.

              Of course, this wouldn't work with the awful, awful configuration dialog that Kubuntu supplies. Deinstall it, it is not worth the bytes on your harddrive. I hear it is a clone from the Mac; if so I pity the Mac people for yet another reason.

              The main problem, to me, is that KDE doesn't differentiate between per-user and system-wide System Settings, but the labels imply that it does. "Personal" and "Look & Feel" are obviously per-user, and "Computer Administration" implies to me that those are system-wide. In reality, it's a mish-mash of the two. This is an important distinction for me, as my wife and I both use the same computer with different profiles.

              That's a good point. Is there a bug report on this on the bug tracker [kde.org]? Of course, you can infer it from the questio

              • by Weedlekin (836313)
                " I hear it is a clone from the Mac; if so I pity the Mac people for yet another reason."

                OS X's "System Preferences" dialogue has a search bar that works extremely well: it not only drops down a list of "hits", but highlights the applet(s) containing each term as one moves through them, and will take users to the correct page of the relevant applet when a term is selected. The Kubuntu configuration system you are describing is not therefore a clone of the Mac one, irrespective of what you may have heard.
                • " I hear it is a clone from the Mac; if so I pity the Mac people for yet another reason."

                  OS X's "System Preferences" dialogue has a search bar that works extremely well: it not only drops down a list of "hits", but highlights the applet(s) containing each term as one moves through them, and will take users to the correct page of the relevant applet when a term is selected. The Kubuntu configuration system you are describing is not therefore a clone of the Mac one, irrespective of what you may have heard.

                  So it has a dropdown list --- Kubuntu's config doesn't. I suppose that makes the apple version tolerable. I hate the lowlighting stuff: if something is irrelevant, removing it altogether (like KConfig does) is infinitely clearer and better. I don't understand the bit about "taking users to the correct page"... how else could it work? Anyway, good thing that part of Mac, at least, isn't screwy, even if it still have a way to come to be on par :)

                  • Actually, it may be better not to remove entirely, since this will make the UI jump about. Generally, if possible, the UI's positioning should remain constant. The true answer would need research... but don't assume that you are right because you have an opinion. My opinion is that the way Spotlight works is better than others I have tried on KDE and GNOME, but that doesn't make it universally true.
                    • Actually, it may be better not to remove entirely, since this will make the UI jump about. Generally, if possible, the UI's positioning should remain constant. The true answer would need research... but don't assume that you are right because you have an opinion. My opinion is that the way Spotlight works is better than others I have tried on KDE and GNOME, but that doesn't make it universally true.

                      Of course it's just my opinion :) Having tried both in KDE (Kubuntus vs KDEs) I find the one where the irrelevant ones are removed entirely better. Firstly, because the list doesn't "jump about"... it contracts, which is not (as) confusing. Perhaps a touch of animation might make it even better. Secondly, because when I'm searching, I'm usually eliminating most (4 of 5 at least) entries. Having all those deactivated items in the list doesn't help me. Maybe it works on the Mac because it is less powerful o

                  • by Weedlekin (836313)
                    "So it has a dropdown list --- Kubuntu's config doesn't. I suppose that makes the apple version tolerable."

                    Indeed.

                    "I hate the lowlighting stuff: if something is irrelevant, removing it altogether (like KConfig does) is infinitely clearer and better."

                    The problem with your preferred method is twofold:

                    1) People who leave a search term in place (or accidentally type some rubbish in that the system "thinks" is a search term) may be presented with an incomplete list of options, and not know why, or how to get the
                    • "I hate the lowlighting stuff: if something is irrelevant, removing it altogether (like KConfig does) is infinitely clearer and better."

                      The problem with your preferred method is twofold:

                      1) People who leave a search term in place (or accidentally type some rubbish in that the system "thinks" is a search term) may be presented with an incomplete list of options, and not know why, or how to get the full list back again.

                      Lowlighting doesn't help with this problem. In fact, it makes it worse... why are all those icons monochrome? They don't work, either. The correct solution to this problem is a clear marking (with text) that you are seeing a subset according to the search terms. Incidentially, removing the items altogether clears up space for this.

                      2) The whole desktop metaphor is based on spatial awareness, which is lost if items keep moving around, disappearing, etc. This is a major reason for so many users disliking the new UI in MS Office -- they'd learned _where_ things were on previous versions, and don't like the fact that they've not only moved, by keep doing so based on context.

                      Rubbish :p That argument is only relevant with something you do often. Configuring the system is hopefully not one of them, unless it is severely broken.

                      "Anyway, good thing that part of Mac, at least, isn't screwy, even if it still have a way to come to be on par :)"

                      While I agree that some things in KDE that are better than their OS X equivalents (and it has things that OS X doesn't have, although the reverse is also true) , UI elements that appear and disappear isn't one of them.

                      I'm not talking about

                    • by Weedlekin (836313)
                      "Lowlighting doesn't help with this problem. In fact, it makes it worse... why are all those icons monochrome?"

                      This is a problem with a particular Linux program, not the Mac, which as I have explained previously, highlights the icons that fit the search criteria. Linux is awash with examples of dreadful UI design (although both the Mac and Windows have their fair share of them too), and this sounds like yet another.

                      "That argument is only relevant with something you do often. Configuring the system is hopefu
                    • "Lowlighting doesn't help with this problem. In fact, it makes it worse... why are all those icons monochrome?"

                      This is a problem with a particular Linux program, not the Mac, which as I have explained previously, highlights the icons that fit the search criteria. Linux is awash with examples of dreadful UI design (although both the Mac and Windows have their fair share of them too), and this sounds like yet another.

                      Highlighting doesn't work with a narrowing search as everything matches initially. So either the Mac doesn't do this in a narrowing search, or, more likely, it does indeed lowlight them. Hence, the problem remains. Thankfully, since it also provides a dropdown list with only the matching items, the problem is mitigated. The linux clone is, as I started out saying, horrible, and I suggest any Kubuntu user instantly removes it from the system. KConfig is far superior, and the default KDE config anyway.

                      "That argument is only relevant with something you do often. Configuring the system is hopefully not one of them, unless it is severely broken."

                      Unfortunately, it may well be one of the things that people who are new to KDE have to do, so bad design choices here can sour the initial experience.

                      Huh?

                    • by Weedlekin (836313)
                      "Highlighting doesn't work with a narrowing search as everything matches initially"

                      I fail to see where this is different from a list, which would also initially contain everything in a narrowing search.

                      "So either the Mac doesn't do this in a narrowing search, or, more likely, it does indeed lowlight them. Hence, the problem remains."

                      The Mac "lowlights" the items that _don't_ fit the search criteria along with the surrounding page, so the ones that do fit stand out because they're not only much brighter and
          • by drgonzo59 (747139)
            As a presumed KDE user you should be the one naming them and listing why would every single user need to have that particular option. I on the other hand, don't use KDE anymore, I forgot all the options as I don't have to worry about remembering them .
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Considering that GNOME is the default on suse, it is amazing. It looks like the more that the distros push GNOME, they more that they shoot themselves in the foot. Hopefully, this survey will stop that crap, but I am guessing that Novell will disregard this part.

        Obviously, Novell pushes Gnome because Novell does not have nearly the same level of control of KDE as they do of Gnome, where a number of Gnome poster boys are on payroll. Ahem, and it is no exaggeration that Microsoft is now paying part of those
        • by 51mon (566265)

          What I do not like is Novell tilting the playing field, turning it more into a political competition and deep pockets competition than an honest features, performance and usability competition.

          Not just Novell, seems SUN, IBM, Nokia, Canonical, Intel, Redhat, are all trying to tilt the field by giving money, or staff, or other resources to the GNOME project. Or possibly it is these companies actually like the GNOME project, and see it as adding value to their businesses.

          I'd accept the commercial interest in

      • by houghi (78078)
        Uh. The reason it is default is because they want to take as many steps away as possible for the SLES and SLED version.

        It is only default. If you wish, you can still install KDE, XFCE, Windowmaker or whatever you like. You can even make your own SUSE based distribution [opensuse.org] for your company, including your own logo's and software (Eat that RedHat and CentOSS)

        Also openSUSE still leaves you the choice as what you want to install.

        So So saying that Novell is pushing GNOME is mere FUD. I would say they worked hard to
    • I've long thought that distros generally prefer GNOME (probably for license and looks-better-out-of-the-box reasons) but users have different criteria about desktop environment choices (looks better after tweaking, does everything you want, fast, and otherwise remains very much out of your way, etc). It is interesting that distros and users should have wants driving them to opposite choices, though, and probably goes to show that Linux has already spread far, far beyond the demographic of geeks that take pa
    • SuSE customers were very pissed when those "Novell desktop strategists" tried to push for their GNOME technology and break the distribution. That was unethical and many Suse employees left the company. The Survey shows that the Ximian crowd failed.
  • The survey data isn't really telling us anything we don't know already about linux users. Linux users are technophiles who still cannot accomplish everything without having to resort to a command line. This means that linux ain't ready for the Windoze using masses. Almost all of you are men, which makes me feel left out again. Many of the applications that linux is deployed in, even in the home, are still not the primary workstation type-uses - router, firewall, web server, print server. You download
    • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

      by sqrt(2) (786011)
      Have you tried Ubuntu? It's probably the most refreshing experience with Linux I've ever had, everything really is done just as well if not better than with Windows. That's not to say that it doesn't have it's hiccups every now and then, but honestly so does Windows. I'm probably more capable of fixing problems on Windows, but the support from the experienced Ubuntu user base is amazing, and fast.
    • by kebes (861706) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @01:21AM (#18999311) Journal

      who still cannot accomplish everything without having to resort to a command line
      Hold on a second... where are you drawing that conclusion from? Is it because 64% of respondents answered "Yes" to the question "Do you use non-graphical tools when installing or administering your Linux operating system?" ??

      I don't think that's the correct conclusion to draw. The 64% merely shows that alot of Linux users prefer the commandline, because it is quite powerful and efficient. If anything, the fact that 36% of users are able to install software and administer their box without ever touching the commandline is evidence that you don't need to touch the commandline in a modern Linux distro. (Unless you think that 36% of openSUSE users never install software or make changes to their system?)

      I agree that many Linux users are technophiles and love the commandline (I know I do), but in a modern Linux distro, there are graphical tools to do just about everything. So can we stop propagating the myth that only UNIX-gurus can run Linux?
      • by renoX (11677)
        >64% merely shows that alot of Linux users prefer the commandline, because it is quite powerful and efficient.

        Note that it can be because the commandline is efficient or because the GUI tools provided by the distribution sucks: a long time ago, Mandrake's upgrade tool was quite good in the commandline version, but the corresponding GUI shell sucked big time, which made me loose quite some time because while the GUI was easy to find, its commandline counterpart was "hidden"..
      • > Hold on a second... where are you drawing that conclusion from?

        Well me personally I would take it from experience. It has come a long way but there are still a lot of things that require you to have some knowledge of the command line to get it working at all.

        It is quite annoying and it will turn off the non-tech savvy user.

        Saying there is graphical options to do things as well doesn't always mean it is easier. For example I have openSuse and I had to change network settings. Did I use the icon in the s
        • by jZnat (793348) *
          I'd rather follow carefully written instructions by copy/pasting some text into a terminal than blindly click on pretty widgets until I find the configuration dialogue(s) for my particular problem.

          Of course, that's just me (and many, many other people). This is especially true on a laptop when you have the choice of a touchpad (meh), clit mouse (meh), another mouse (kinda makes it a little less portable), or using its keyboard so conveniently placed for you. If you're a hunt'n'peck typist who types at 5 W
          • > I'd rather follow carefully written instructions by copy/pasting some text
            > into a terminal than blindly click on pretty widgets until I find the
            > configuration dialogue(s) for my particular problem.

            I would agree with you except that 9 times out of 10 the instructions are far from carefully written.

      • by houghi (78078)
        For me it is the right tool at the right time. Some times I edit files directly with vi. Other times I use the YaST GUI.. It is as if you ask a carpenter what he uses, a hammer or a screwdriver.

        They are not realy OR/OR questions, they should be AND/AND questions.

        Oh and using YaST can be done form the CLI as well. ;-)
    • """
      The survey data isn't really telling us anything we don't know already about linux users. Linux users are technophiles who still cannot accomplish everything without having to resort to a command line. This means that linux ain't ready for the Windoze using masses.
      """

      I'd honestly like to know how you got from A to B on this one i.e. Just b/c the techie's /prefer/ the command line does _not_ mean a GUI doesn't exist or is crap. It just means that they don't typically use it. So what?

      """
      Almost all of you
    • by pembo13 (770295)
      Do you have a problem with or phobia of men? I ask because I don't understand why the gender of others would cause you to feel left out.
    • by jgrahn (181062)

      Almost all of you are men, which makes me feel left out again.

      It should make you feel special.

      Or better, you should try not to think too much of the relation between yourself and some piece of non-scientific, badly laid out statistics.

    • Linux users are technophiles who still cannot accomplish everything without having to resort to a command line.
      As opposed to Windows users, who cannot accomplish the same tasks because the tools to perform those tasks do not exist. Unless you count cygwin, or compilers so that you can create those tools.
    • That makes .conf files look pellucidly clear... at least .conf files have human-readable comments in them.

      There is indeed too much CLI stuff involved with Linux, but it's going away year by year.

      Setting up your network used to be command line, now just about any modern distro will find the LAN and hook up to it automatically.

      You used to need it to run multimedia, now run Automatix or an equivalent for another distro and it's running. Palm PDAs used to require a command line session, now, just open
  • by gnu-sucks (561404) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @12:59AM (#18999187) Journal
    What really surprised me (besides the large number of female users... haha) is that 36% of the users survayed DO NOT use "non-graphical tools (e.g. YaST text mode, console) when installing or administering your Linux operating system"

    Either desktop linux tools have changed a lot in the past few years, or these people aren't digging that far into their systems.
    • 36% of the users survayed DO NOT use "non-graphical tools (e.g. YaST text mode, console) when installing or administering your Linux operating system"
      Either desktop linux tools have changed a lot in the past few years, or these people aren't digging that far into their systems.

      Actually YaST and the other GUI tools are pretty good. You *can* do pretty much everything you need to for normal (and quite often advanced) administration tasks if you want to.

      I personally prefer the command line for a lot

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by thrawn_aj (1073100)

      these people aren't digging that far into their systems.

      Hmm, perhaps they are, oh I don't know, busy folks who have barely enough time to USE their machines towards the purpose for which they bought it :P?

      [sarcasm]

      You know what? I'm a physicist, and I am seriously offended at people who show no curiosity whatsoever about the quantum mechanical theory of the semiconductor (which after all, is the basis of the whole shebang) when they use their computers every day.

      [/sarcasm] Oh wait, that's rather stupid isn't it?

      I have just as much contempt for this flav

      • by jgrahn (181062) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @03:15AM (#18999745)

        I have used the Linux commandline in numerous stages of my life (as also DOS and even VMS) and I wasn't impressed. Memorizing arcane commands to do simple things (vi as a text editor is an extreme example of its absurdity) is on par with memorizing Clebsch-Gordon coefficients :P.

        You are wrong, or at least wired differently from me and other command-line people.

        It's not about memorizing arcane commands. It's about being able and willing to research the tools while using them. "How can I use the find command to list all files larger than a gigabyte? *browses the man page* Oh, that's how. *back to work*" If you still know how two weeks later; fine. If not, you simply read the man page again.

        And seriously, how is a GUI better? Take the MS Word preferences which I battled yesterday. A tiny window filled with twelve tabbed screens which jump around at random, each containing more than a dozen settings and frequently sub-dialogues. And no useful reference documentation which explains what these bloody settings actually do.

        Above all, why it's become fashionable to run these tasks in your own personal RAM (*points to brain*) when the mindless computing machine in front of you can handle them quite easily is a mystery to me.

        It's not fashion; many of us seriously believe the command-line way is superior for most tasks. I truly cannot see how not doing that way somehow offloads work from your brain to the computer. My experience is exactly the opposite -- pointless memorizing, futile searching and mindless repetive tasks is something I associate with non-commandlines (i.e. using Windows and GUI applications).

        • Sorry, but no. Just no. I bet you're glad this is all happening over the internet because there's no way you could've kept a straight face when you were writing that.

          You are wrong, or at least wired differently from me and other command-line people.

          It's not about memorizing arcane commands. It's about being able and willing to research the tools while using them. "How can I use the find command to list all files larger than a gigabyte? *browses the man page* Oh, that's how. *back to work*" If you still know how two weeks later; fine. If not, you simply read the man page again.

          I bet he's wired differently. As am I. As are the vast majority of people on this planet. We see computers above all else as tools to do things, not something to be investigated in and of themselves. Sure, plenty of people such as myself might be interested in how they work might even program them, but the primary reason to use a computer is

          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by greenbird (859670)

            I bet he's wired differently. As am I. As are the vast majority of people on this planet. We see computers above all else as tools to do things, not something to be investigated in and of themselves. Sure, plenty of people such as myself might be interested in how they work might even program them, but the primary reason to use a computer is to complete a task of some kind, even if that task is just playing a game and having fun. We don't want to research the tools while using them, we just want to use them.

            So I guess knowledge just magically jumps into your head. Must be nice. I know whether it's a GUI tool or the command line I have to research how to configure and do things on my computers. I find a set of clear concise documented tools much easier to use than a maze of undocumented menus, windows and tabs.

            No regular person wants to read a manual either. How would you feel if your power drill disassembled itself each month and you had to read a manual of randomly arrowed diagrams and Korean instructions, would you still appreciate "researching tools while using them"? Because that's what man pages are to the common computer user: an absolute mess of technical terms and presumed prior knowledge that can only be half understood unless you're willing to take your computer use up from casual user to demi-expert. Most users aren't willing to do that, and there's absolutely no reason they should.

            When's the last time you used your drill for to track your expenses or edit a picture or do your taxes or research refrigerators? You know what? I think a computer just might be a just little more co

            • So I guess knowledge just magically jumps into your head. Must be nice. I know whether it's a GUI tool or the command line I have to research how to configure and do things on my computers. I find a set of clear concise documented tools much easier to use than a maze of undocumented menus, windows and tabs.

              It does jump into my head. Not using magic though, using the wonder of sight. Any menu and option/control is labelled so you can quite easily follow a logical path to find the option and what it does. A little more intuitive than a blinking command prompt, don't you think?

              When's the last time you used your drill for to track your expenses or edit a picture or do your taxes or research refrigerators? You know what? I think a computer just might be a just little more complex than a drill. Kind of makes your comparison a little fallacious.

              How does that make my argument fallacious? It just proves my point precisely. A more complex machine means even more confusing manuals, meaning all the more reason not be expected to memorise the means to correctly operate it without hav

              • 428 lines, not pages.

                Stupid typo.
      • by Dhalka226 (559740)

        I have just as much contempt for this flavor of arrogance as I do for the macho idiots who sneer at you if you get an oil change at a shop rather than do it yourself

        So much so, it seems, that you explode even when there is no arrogance demonstrated.

        "Either desktop linux tools have changed a lot in the past few years, or these people aren't digging that far into their systems." That's all he said. There was no value judgment. He didn't declare that these were clearly a lesser breed of human being beca

      • by ChrisMaple (607946)
        Every day, using vi, I accomplish in seconds things that would take minutes or hours in a GUI editor. Occasionally I do things that would take days, weeks, even months in a GUI editor. The power available from memorizing about 30 commands and learning regular expressions is astounding, provided, of course, that you actually have a use for such power.
      • Wait, you mean some computer users just want a computer to assist them in their daily business? They don't want to be computer experts, and they don't care about having the latest updates to every package simply because the previous version worked just fine for them? Not everyone enjoys tweaking their machines to get that last 1% out of it??? The horror!!! I bet these l0sers also don't modify their Honda Accord's exhaust system for an extra 2-3 horsepower and probably don't have any sort of home automation
  • they need to conduct the same survey across ALL the distros at the same time. Perhaps set it up again, but get the others to link to it. It would be interesting to see how they all stack up.
  • Conclusion (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Nick_taken (1090721) on Saturday May 05, 2007 @01:01AM (#18999199)
    Everyone got an email
  • I've used it on and off. I actually bought the retail packages for the 5.x and 7.x releases and always went back to debian. I also gave 10.x series a shot, and for me it's been yast that has sucked compared to apt. Maybe I'm just not patient enough, but yast is slow. As far as I'm concerned, debian based releases are just far easier to maintain. SuSE on the other hand does seem to support more hardware out of the box, (for the most part) and the UI is a tad better from the system/hardware point of view.
  • by navyjeff (900138)
    Is anyone else wondering how they managed to get 21,171 e-mail address responses when they had only 21,165 respondents to the survey?

    Seems like some restaurant math to me.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 05, 2007 @06:55AM (#19000479)
    15. Where do you usually get Microsoft[R] Windows Vista[TM]?

    Steal it from computer or software shop 7%
    Download from thepiratebay homepage 70%
    "Free CD" from friends (hey, they said it's free) 10%
    I actually bought it. 3%
    Other (please specify) 10%
  • You can get those with SUSE now [blogs.com]; not sure what the 2K version gets you, but seems like a reasonable price for a starter workstation...
  • #23L What should be changed in future versions of openSUSE? (Multiple answers possible)

    Tear up and renounce Novell's deal with Microsoft

    (Former SuSE user since version 6.0 came out)
  • %2 of the respondents are women... There certainly is something wrong with the community, if it cannot attract almost any women...
  • For the price of five 1 GByte USB sticks and one 80 GByte portable hard disc from Teac, you can give 25,000 Linux users give you their email address.

NOWPRINT. NOWPRINT. Clemclone, back to the shadows again. - The Firesign Theater

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