Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Linux Software

Seven Essential Tips For Using Ubuntu Feisty Fawn 282

Posted by Zonk
from the hard-to-wrangle dept.
Ed Albro writes "Matthew Newton, a columnist at PC World, has a great article up on seven things you'll want to change as soon as you start using Feisty Fawn. Some are as simple as making sure the Alt key works right, another gives you step-by-step instructions for turning on the impressive Beryl interface. 'I could spend a whole 'nother column telling you about all the great packages that are not installed by default, but for now I'll just leave you with this bonus tip: If you're running Ubuntu on a laptop and your Wi-Fi card is not detected or supported, try installing the Ndisgtk package (listed as such in Synaptic, but as 'Wireless Windows Drivers' in Add/Remove Applications). Then select the new System, Administration, Windows Wireless Drivers entry in Ubuntu's menu bar.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Seven Essential Tips For Using Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Comments Filter:
  • Automatix? Ugh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by joe_cot (1011355) on Friday April 20, 2007 @12:52PM (#18813289) Homepage
    Don't get me wrong: I'm glad Ubuntu is getting the publicity. What bothers me the most about this article, though, is that he suggests that one of the first things you should do is install Automatix

    Automatix is simple, and easy to use. It'll automatically install a lot of important stuff -- but it does so in a bad way. Overwriting files, removing dependencies, messing up the ubuntu-desktop metapackage -- name a brute-force method to deal a low blow to your package management system, and Automatix does it in ways that make developers cringe.

    This is not usually a problem initially, but eventually you end up paying the piper; when it's time to update to the next version, things break, and it's Automatix's fault. A large portion of problems people experienced moving from Dapper to Edgy were caused by Automatix; Automatix refused to support those problems, and claimed it was our fault. I don't have a problem with Automatix existing, but until they take responsibility for the problems they cause, I'm not going to go recommending it to users. It does more harm than good.
  • by zborro (591127) on Friday April 20, 2007 @12:58PM (#18813351) Homepage
    Nice to see tips for the newbies to help them set up the system in the way they like best,
    but I feel that the system just after installation is already really usable and reliable.
    If you are not an expert and you start to turn on Beryl and to play with Synaptic...
    I believe that a lot of people will be going back to windows because their system has become
    unusable.

    Once you're ready to take off, you will discover by yourself these great features.

    Just my idea.
    marco
    • by Knuckles (8964)
      Recommending Automatix to newbies is irresponsible, especially since they won't need it.
    • My computer was up and running with the default install. However, it was running at a less than optimum resolution. So, I used a Ubuntu's new tool to install the proprietary NVIDIA drivers.

      So, of course, my 8800GTS does not work with Ubuntu's version of NVIDIAs drivers and xorg crashed. Which is total BS since Nvidia's latest drivers (which have been around for at least a month) work with the 8800GTS.

      Why alienate users?! They should have delayed the release.

      (Also, where is the Fiesty Install Guide? The
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by _Sprocket_ (42527)

      If you are not an expert and you start to turn on Beryl and to play with Synaptic...

      I'm curious as to the issue with Synaptic. I just started using Kubuntu and find myself using Synaptic, Adept, and apt-get interchangeably. On my Debian desktop, I've done the same with apt-get and Synaptic for years without negative impact. Is there something subtle that I'm missing?

      I agree with Beryl. It's quite spiff but when it breaks, it does so in rather annoying ways. Right now it works fairly reliably for me a

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 20, 2007 @01:05PM (#18813469)
    there is a show stopper bug in either the kernel or driver for the ata2 interface.

    it's confirmed now that on many laptops the kernel has to restart the ata2 interface intermittently and thereby lock up your system for up to 30 seconds at a time essentially rendering your laptop useless.

    stay on lts or edgy for the time being until this bug is fixed:

    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux-so urce-2.6.20/+bug/107271 [launchpad.net]
    • from what i've heard, keeping a CD in the cdrom resolves this.
      • by MagicM (85041) on Friday April 20, 2007 @01:44PM (#18814071)
        And gluing a penny to the top of your PC lets you use imported software.

        It's true! Try it!
        • And gluing a penny to the top of your PC lets you use imported software.

          It's true! Try it!


          It works, but make sure Lincoln is facing UP. If you glue the coin heads-down, ol' Abe gets pissed and sends gamma rays thru your RAM, randomly causing errors and crashing. ECC RAM helps, but eventually the wailing of the damned will get to you. The only way to fix this without prying off the penny is to 'apt-get install van-helsing'. The van-helsing package will take care of your undead problem, but will probably
          • by Tumbleweed (3706) *
            >And gluing a penny to the top of your PC lets you use imported software.
            >It's true! Try it!

            It works, but make sure Lincoln is facing UP.


            Unless you're in the southern hemisphere, then you make him face DOWN. C'mon, people, not everyone lives in the USA! *sheesh*

            • by Minwee (522556)
              That wouldn't be a problem if you were using a drive manufactured in the southern hemisphere. The discs spin the other way there.
              • by Tumbleweed (3706) *
                That wouldn't be a problem if you were using a drive manufactured in the southern hemisphere. The discs spin the other way there.

                Spinning discs? What century are you living in? You need to move to the solid state!
    • I have this problem on a desktop computer, too. :(
    • Some nice FUD there. My laptop works fine - upgraded yesterday without a hitch. All laptops aren't useless with 7.04. Windows has some bugs too, shall we keep that off laptops (or mod some Microsoft laptop FUD to +5)?
    • Nice job linking to an unconfirmed bug. How do we know this isn't your fubared hardware causing this problem? And based on your sample of one you conclude that all folks with laptops should avoid Feisty? That's a load of bull.

      Feisty has worked fine on my laptop for one month since I installed the beta release. These people work very hard testing the kernel on many different systems, including laptops.
    • There's a new note in that thread that there's a work around available at the end of this thread [launchpad.net]
    • The new release works great on my Asus M3N laptop; this is a rare case and appears to be fixable. The fix is mentioned on the bottom of that bugreport:

      Bug 84603 is the same problem and has a workaround. The new ata-piix driver doesn't play nicely with HAL, so use the old piix driver instead.

      To hazard a guess you'd modprobe -r ata-piix and modprobe piix. To make this fix 'permanent' you'd add piix to your modules list and blacklist ata-piix. Don't take my word for it though, discuss it in the forums or IRC.

    • Make that some laptops. I'm running 7.04 on a ThinkPad T30 and I've had no problems at all.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by RedBear (207369)

      it's confirmed now that on many laptops the kernel has to restart the ata2 interface intermittently and thereby lock up your system for up to 30 seconds at a time essentially rendering your laptop useless.

      Wow. That's fantastic. I used to use Linux in various incarnations as my main desktop OS. I root for it every day to continue improving. And it has improved, in so many ways. But it seems to be approaching true polish and usability on an asymptotic curve rather than a more linear progression. When even wha

  • Tip #8 (Score:5, Funny)

    by EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) on Friday April 20, 2007 @01:06PM (#18813477)
    "Wanna play with my Fiesty Fawn?" should never be used as a pick-up line.
    • by Lumpy (12016)
      I agree.

      the one that works for me is ...

      Hey, you wanna play with my Wii?

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      What about "Can I install my Randy Rhino into your Slippery Snatch"
  • but I just upgraded to Feisty and my system is borked now. Not sure what's wrong. But I'll do a backup and do a fresh reinstall rather than an upgrade.
  • If you're running Ubuntu on a laptop and your Wi-Fi card is not detected or supported, try installing the Ndisgtk package (listed as such in Synaptic, but as 'Wireless Windows Drivers' in Add/Remove Applications). Sucks be to you if your only connectivity is Wireless...
    • by Blakey Rat (99501)
      Yeah, I had that exact same problem when I tried to install the last version on my iBook.

      Installing networking drivers, especially wireless ones, should never require a network connection. And every open source developer should be forced to read Catch-22.
  • How do I use APT to upgrade from my Edgy install to Feisty?
    • What's wrong with using the update manager?

      It used to be that the apt method was:

      "apt-get dist-upgrade" or something close to that. That method doesn't seem to be recommended for this upgrade.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by i.r.id10t (595143)
        Definately not good to apt-get dist-upgrade.... my home machine's IDE drives suddenly got referenced as scsis, all sorts of heck broke loose and there was much wailing and gnashing of teeth.

        My work machine I followed the process of using the update manager, and all is well.
      • If I recall correctly you just need to make sure Eft is completely up to date before dist-upgrading to Fiesty. Apt changed sometime in Edgy so you need to make sure you are using the latest version of Apt before you begin grabbing Feisty packages.

        I'm sure a search on the Ubuntu Wiki [ubuntu.com] will turn up more specific details.
      • by Doc Ruby (173196)
        The current dist is Edgy, so I don't think the sources.list file will update from the Feisty material, unless it's changed.
    • by physicsnick (1031656) on Friday April 20, 2007 @01:45PM (#18814075)
      Here is the official guide from ubuntu.com: http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/upgrading [ubuntu.com]

      First make sure your computer is fully up to date (with Edgy). Then follow these instructions:

      1. Open System -> Administration -> Update Manager
      2. A button on the top of the window will appear, informing you of the availability of the new release
      3. Click Upgrade
      4. Follow the on-screen instructions

      That page also has a link on how to upgrade manually from a command-line, but it's not recommended.
      • by sgtrock (191182)
        Did they fix it so it works for Kubuntu this time around?
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by physicsnick (1031656)
          The procedure's a bit different, but (assuming you stuck with the default KDE), then yes, it's essentially the same thing with Kubuntu; run K -> System -> Adept Manager, enable edgy-updates, update everything, then restart Adept Manager and a version upgrade will be offered.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by kuzb (724081)
        and then hope it doesn't break, lock up your system or outright die because all the mirrors are overloaded. Even on the fastest DSL right now, an upgrade is probably going to take hours. It might be a really good idea to wait a few days before trying this.
    • by Knuckles (8964)
      How do I use APT to upgrade from my Edgy install to Feisty?

      Assuming you mean apt-get or aptitude: preferably not at all. Read http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/upgrading [ubuntu.com]
      If you insist, click the link at the bottom of the page.

      Nitpick: APT is the Advanced Packaging Tool, and you always use it automatically when upgrading a Debian-based system, even when you don't use apt-get/aptitude but update-manager, as recommended at the above link.
      • debian predates apt-get and neither it nor the apt libraries are strictly nessacery for updating though they do make it much easier.

        i'm not sure what the apt libs do cover though i do know it includes at least some networking stuff but the actual installation removal and upgrading of packages is always performed directly or indirectly by running dpkg.

        • by Knuckles (8964)
          You are right that the APT tools use dpkg to perform the actual local removal/installation of packages, but nevertheless you always use APT when upgrading the distro, which was what I talked about (not updating a single package). Sure you can do it with dpkg -- email me in 2010 when you have manually resolved the dependencies of a few thousand packages.
  • by oxfletch (108699) on Friday April 20, 2007 @01:20PM (#18813671)
    So the article is basically "How to install a bunch of shit that wasn't installed by default for good reasons". Not a good idea.

    Binary drivers that are completely unsupportable.
    A package manager that conflict with the default one.
    3D whiz-bang eye candy that's unstable, and requires yet more binary drivers to get 3D.

    Magic.
    • I agree that binary drivers are a bad idea and the package management works best in a unified way. However, I like the 3D wiz bang graphics. Please note that they do not require binary drivers to do 3D, at least not if you get intel graphics. Why Linux users continue to buy products that don't work with free software is beyond me.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by oxfletch (108699)
        Intel graphics chips, whilst commendable, are not available as an add-in card for any existing system. Else, yes, I'd buy one.

        There is no solution for 3D with dual-DVI.

        "Why Linux users continue to buy products that don't work with free software is beyond me." ... ummm ... some of us keep our systems for a couple of years. That's longer than the intel product has been available. And ... AMD systems?
    • by Knuckles (8964)
      +1 Insightful. I wish these people would either go away, or at least don't call their broken ideas "essential" (Automatix?). That, or hang out in ubuntu-users afterwards, to help the users they have led into breaking their systems.
  • Huh? (Score:2, Funny)

    by creimer (824291)
    The right-hand alt key is not configured... does anyone actually use the right-hand keys (alt, windows, menu context, ctrl, and shift)? I have never ever used that part of the keyboard.
  • In all honesty.. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Mockylock (1087585)
    What are the new features of the latest version of Ubuntu aside from the 3D desktop toggling? I haven't read much about it, and wondered if there were any breakthrough tools or features.
    • Re:In all honesty.. (Score:4, Informative)

      by mhall119 (1035984) on Friday April 20, 2007 @03:32PM (#18815647) Homepage Journal
      * Automatic codec installation is new and very helpful for multi-media.
      * Restricted driver manager, helpful for those who need proprietary drivers (helped me with nvidia).
      * Upstart, makes boot time much faster.
      * Upstream upgrades for Linux Kernel, Gnome, Evolution, OpenOffice, Xorg, Gaim (I think) and many others.

      Maybe not as big a difference as there is upgrading from WinXP to Vista, but then again Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy) was only released 6 months ago, not 6 years ago like XP.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by miro f (944325)

        * Upstart, makes boot time much faster.


        well, I'm looking at /etc/event.d and I see they still have the old sysvinit compatibility scripts there. So upstart hasn't actually changed anything to do with boot time, the boot process is still exactly the same.
  • by Hoplite3 (671379) on Friday April 20, 2007 @02:07PM (#18814411)
    Save yourself sanity. Don't use devices that only have windows drivers running through NDISwrapper. You'll get only a tiny fraction of the functionality, it'll break all the time. My experience has been that devices with in-kernel drivers are worth whatever premium. Always get the intel wireless on your laptop.

    NDIS is the lowest level of hardware "support" in Linux. If Stallman warns about binary blobs or nonfree drivers because you don't know what the code is and the drivers stop working after the company stops maintaining them ... just image how terrible it is when you are using another OS's buggy binary-only driver. You have that mental image. Now add demons pouring acid down your throat. You're approaching the reality of NDISwrapper. I think half-broken internet access is worse than no access. You just get tempted to believe that you can really get whatever from the net, only to find that when you count on connectivity, it breaks.

    Who is this PC World joker, anyway?
  • If you're using an RT2500-based wifi card (it's a pretty common one), get the Windows driver and install it using ndiswrapper. If your wifi card is the only way your PC can access the Internet, make sure you get everything ready before you install Feisty.

    My RT2500 worked fine on 6.x as long as I wasn't using WPA (which had to be set up manually and crapped out every hour), but the card won't connect at all with 7.x. From what I can tell it has something to do with Feisty using newer RT2500 drivers, which se
  • My problem with upgrading recently was how Ubuntu handled my Grub menu.lst. The box I am referring to has /hda1 as a FAT drive with the system restore junk for WinXP. /hda2 is WinXP. /hda3 is Linux. One of the late alpha (or was it early beta) updates redid the menu.lst to map to UUID numbers instead of the more user friendly /hdX series.

    The problem is that it thinks /hda1 is Linux, and /hda2 is WinXP. Naturally, the latter is right, and I haven't the time to go back and correct the box so that it points to
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by halovaa (774219)
      UUIDs are less likely to get changed than the /dev/hd* or /dev/sd* letters. These are sometimes assigned randomly, depending on how your system is set up, or get shuffled in interesting and non-intuitive ways when partitions are changed. My real-life example: I had an IDE controller PCI card in my system. What would happen is that it would sometimes take hda->hdd, leaving my real boot drive as hde, and other times it would take hde->hdh. If I had known about UUIDs, I could have just accepted the c
      • by Dausha (546002)
        Thanks. That makes sense. I suppose my uses have been too pedestrian to encounter that problem.
  • VMware Tip (Score:4, Informative)

    by yoshi_mon (172895) on Friday April 20, 2007 @03:00PM (#18815221)
    After installing the VMware tools the scroll wheel on most mice will become disabled. To fix this:

    1. sudo -i (To become root.)
    2. nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf (Or with what ever text editor you wish.)
    3. In the Section "InputDevice" for your mouse change the line under "Protocol" that says, "ps/2" to "ImPS/2".
    4. Restart X. (ctrl-alt-backspace, reboot, etc)
  • Automatix (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Ash-Fox (726320) on Friday April 20, 2007 @04:21PM (#18816429)
    I disagree with using 'Automatix'. If you just installed the package ubuntu-restricted-extras you would of achieved the same result (flash, mp3, sun java6, dvd etc support).

Somebody ought to cross ball point pens with coat hangers so that the pens will multiply instead of disappear.

Working...