Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Linux Software

Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Released 590

Posted by kdawson
from the have-at-it dept.
Lots of readers told us about the official release of Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn (screenshots here for Ubuntu and Kubuntu). Some readers report that the distribution servers are being hammered. Here is a review of Feisty Fawn. Reader LinuxScribe sends us to LinuxPlanet for the story on a pleasant Java surprise in the release.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Released

Comments Filter:
  • by cow ninja (306125) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:56AM (#18797159)
    Here is a quick mirror: (ftp also works) [indiana.edu]http://ftp.ussg.indiana.edu/linux/ubuntu-releases/ 7.04/ [indiana.edu] maintained by http://www.ussg.iu.edu [iu.edu]

    Go ahead, take our bandwidth :)
    • by didde (685567) * on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:59AM (#18797227) Homepage

      Let's not forget The Pirate Bay, people. They've had this up since 03:00 UTC.

      The .torrent [thepiratebay.org] is available here.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by ender- (42944)
      Get those torrents going folks :)

      They haven't finished downloading yet but I've got bittorrent going on a 10Mbit connection for the following two disks [torrent links from the mirror posted above]:

      Ubuntu Desktop i386 [indiana.edu]
      Ubuntu Desktop amd64 [indiana.edu]

      I'll leave them running for a day or two once they're finished downloading.
    • The release was officially announced on the mailing list moments ago. Here is the link:

      https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-announce/ 2007-April/000102.html [ubuntu.com]
    • by mattnuzum (839319) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:24AM (#18797597) Homepage
      Try the homepage now. We've simplified things and will update the mirror list frequently until the excitement dies down.

      Please note that if you use Ubuntu now, you can update very easily, but don't use dist-upgrade. Instead:

      Before you start

              * You can only directly upgrade to Ubuntu 7.04 ("Feisty Fawn") from Ubuntu 6.10 ("Edgy Eft") (see UpgradeNotes)
              * Be sure that you have all updates applied to Ubuntu 6.10 before you upgrade
              * The latest version of Update Manager (0.45.2) must be installed before you upgrade. Otherwise, you will receive an Authentication failed error. See [WWW] here for instructions how to check if you have the required version.

      Note: If you have a version of Ubuntu which was released before Ubuntu 6.10, please see http://wiki.ubuntu.com/Installation/UpgradeFromOld Version [ubuntu.com] for information on how to upgrade.

      Network upgrade for Ubuntu desktops (recommended)

      You can easily upgrade over the network with the following procedure.

            1. Open System -> Administration -> Update Manager
            2. A button on the top of the window will appear, informing you of the availability of the new release
            3. Click Upgrade
            4. Follow the on-screen instructions
      • by Spudds (860292) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:53AM (#18798095)

        You can easily upgrade over the network with the following procedure.

                    1. Open System -> Administration -> Update Manager

        There's a gui to upgrade the distro version???

        It seems that ubuntu is the first distro to really "just get it" when it comes to the desktop!
        All hail the New Hope for Linux on the Desktop!
        • by niteice (793961) <icefragment@gmail.com> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:08AM (#18798343) Journal
          Technically speaking, it's just the package updater (like Windows Update but less evil), which also is capable of updating the entire distro.
        • by bill_kress (99356) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:41AM (#18798929)
          Yes, very close.

          I've dipped into Linux many times (Since before CDs) but this is the first time I've installed it on all my computers.

          Yesterday, in fact, I got windows XP running within Ubuntu (My current project requires it) and it was easy, free and very slick. This means I can convert my last remaining dual-boot computers (because of games, mostly) over to Linux.

          I still run into things here and there that SHOULD just take 5 minutes but end up taking 2 hours of research, but much less often than with any other distro--and I haven't figured out how to get dual monitors working yet. Oh, and suspend/resume still doesn't work on any of the 3 laptops (I got my wife a MAC and the fact that suspend/resume always works, and does so quickly and smoothly makes me so jealous!)

          Every install worked flawlessly in each laptop. CD's, floppies and USB drives are automatically mounted, all resolutions are available on the screens (even wide-screens), and even my wireless internal lan adapter just worked out of the box.

          With the addition of Click And Go (I hope it's in this release) it'll be MUCH easier to acquire and install new software than it is in Windows.

          If you are considering installing Linux for the first time, I advise you scan this page first--I use it all the time now. It gives you a great summary of what can be done and how to do it. Most "Tasks" are simply a few entries on the CLI now--and most installs can be done from a decent GUI as well (the guide uses CLI because it's easier to describe) http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu_Edgy [ubuntuguide.org]

          Oh, and hey--one complaint (more of an observation actually), for those of you who complain about how often you must enter the root password on a PC, take a look at that page and see how often "SUDO" (the Linux equivalent) is required. Holy cow, it's like every single time you want to call apt-get (in other words, any time you want to install ANYTHING), you have to give up the root password. I believe this means that all install scripts are running as root--I don't know if this is a security hole, but it sure sounds like one. This is the exact equivalent to every windows program install requiring administrator access--something they have at least recognized as a flaw and begun to combat.

          But at any rate--seriously, it's now mainstream. Stick it on your grandma's computer. This from a Very Picky user.
          • by daveewart (66895) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:59AM (#18799271)

            Oh, and hey--one complaint (more of an observation actually), for those of you who complain about how often you must enter the root password on a PC, take a look at that page and see how often "SUDO" (the Linux equivalent) is required. Holy cow, it's like every single time you want to call apt-get (in other words, any time you want to install ANYTHING), you have to give up the root password. I believe this means that all install scripts are running as root--I don't know if this is a security hole, but it sure sounds like one.

            First, a correction: sudo requires you to enter your own password, not the root password.

            Requiring administrative/root privileges to install software is the whole point. You are installing programs that are to be used system-wide. You need root privileges (granted to you via sudo) to do that. It's not a security hole when implemented properly. The point is that, unlike many Windows desktop, you're not running with 'root' privileges all the time. This is exactly what most Windows XP desktops are doing. You never need to be prompted for a 'root'/admin password when doing that, because you're always admin! That's insecure.

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by kestasjk (933987)

              Requiring administrative/root privileges to install software is the whole point. You are installing programs that are to be used system-wide. You need root privileges (granted to you via sudo) to do that. It's not a security hole when implemented properly. The point is that, unlike many Windows desktop, you're not running with 'root' privileges all the time. This is exactly what most Windows XP desktops are doing. You never need to be prompted for a 'root'/admin password when doing that, because you're always admin! That's insecure.

              I think Linux distros would benefit a lot from making it possible to install apps under a user account. I always do this with custom compiled software, it seems logical to do it for possibly dubious (i.e universe repository) software that doesn't need to install things as admin. It would be reassuring to know that non-dependency/library, single user, non-system software never has admin permissions.

            • Pure FUD! (Score:3, Informative)

              by HalAtWork (926717)
              Um, in Ubuntu you're NOT always admin. There is no way to log in as root in Ubuntu. The first user you create gets sudo priveledges automatically, and the "root" account inherits the password of the first user account you create. From then on, any user you create does not have any escelated priveledges whatsoever. The idea behind this is that you use the first account you created to administer, therefore enforcing the idea that you should never log in as root or run anything unnecessary as root, and the
              • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

                by lahvak (69490)
                Um, in Ubuntu you're NOT always admin. There is no way to log in as root in Ubuntu. The first user you create gets sudo priveledges automatically, and the "root" account inherits the password of the first user account you create. From then on, any user you create does not have any escelated priveledges whatsoever.

                Ehm, actually, the root account does not inherit any password. You are correct that by default, there is no way to log in as root in ubuntu. The reason for that is that the root account does not h
          • by Jestrzcap (46989) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:10PM (#18799449)

            Oh, and hey--one complaint (more of an observation actually), for those of you who complain about how often you must enter the root password on a PC, take a look at that page and see how often "SUDO" (the Linux equivalent) is required. Holy cow, it's like every single time you want to call apt-get (in other words, any time you want to install ANYTHING), you have to give up the root password. I believe this means that all install scripts are running as root--I don't know if this is a security hole, but it sure sounds like one. This is the exact equivalent to every windows program install requiring administrator access--something they have at least recognized as a flaw and begun to combat.
            This not entirely true. (in an otherwise positive post). It's true, when you need to install something you will likely need to provide *your* password (there is no root password, just accounts with sudo privilege). However, sudo will only ask for your password once every 5 minutes (and that can be changed) so you can accomplish a variety of tasks with only one password entry. Having to be root to write to certain directories is essential for the security of linux.

            In the future if you think something is a hassle or annoying, do a little research on it, Linux is very flexible and odds are you can modify or change it.
        • by Eivind (15695) <eivindorama@gmail.com> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:07PM (#18799417) Homepage
          Yes there is. And it's very very grandmother-friendly too. My procedure:
          • Log in, as usual.
          • There's a message for me, indicated by a slowly pulsing alert-icon. It reads: "There are updates available for Ubuntu, click here if you want to install them. So I do.
          • I'm met with the familiar update-manager, only this time it has a new button: "There is a new version of Ubuntu available, 7.1 Feisty Fawn, click here to upgrade."
          • I click, and am informed that this required administrative priviledge, and would I please enter my password to proceed.
          • I do as told, wait half an hour, and that's it.

          I've never seen anything even close to this smooth. It's not just a Linux-best. It's quite simply the best I've ever seen.

          Oh, and did I mention I lied above ? You see, all the messages mentioned was nicely localized into my native written Language, nynorsk, the least used variant of Norwegian, which perhaps half a million people in the world write. I'm impressed.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by therevan (312663)
      Thanks for posting those mirror links. For the KDE and educational users out there, here are the links to Indiana University's mirrors for the Feisty versions of:

      Xubuntu (the Xfce variant for low-end machines) is up on Ubuntu's official image servers:

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:56AM (#18797163)
    Does that mean they removed it?
    • by Kirth (183) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:08AM (#18797361) Homepage
      They bundled it. Except on 64bit machines, where it still does not work correctly and still does not have a browser plugin; because the bug-report for this is only two years old.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by geschild (43455)

        Lets get the facts right, here. It's not a bug-report, it's an RFE, a Request for Enhancement.

        AND IT'S BLOODY FOUR YEARS OLD!!!

        See for your self: http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id =4802695 [sun.com]

        To add insult to injury, when the status of this 'RFE' only very recently changed (January 16th 2007), IT WAS TARGETED FOR THE NEXT RELEASE. In other words it'll be another 18 months.

        And the first person who tells me I should use a 32-bit browser anyway, I'm going to strangle with Java-code.

        Excuse me for l

  • torrents (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:56AM (#18797177)
    Don't bother with the official sites - I think they must be running Ubuntu Sluggish Slug Server Edition! Kidding aside, there are a myriad of torrent options.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:59AM (#18797223)
    Yes Linux has come a long way in desktop features and the other things that make up a desktop environment, but I just don't understand how Linux desktop UIs still can't manage to get spacing, font/text placement and alignment, shading, and all the other details that make OS X so instantly appealing to so many people, regardless if they want to are able to pay for Macs of their own to use.

    Just compare:

    http://shots.linuxquestions.org/scaled/Ubuntu%207. 04/11.gif [linuxquestions.org]

    vs

    http://images.apple.com/macosx/leopard/images/inde xdesktop20060807.jpg [apple.com]

    I just don't understand how there can remain such a huge gap in the attention to detail and refinement with Linux desktops and apps. Have Linux developers never used Interface builder and it's alignment spacing tools or ever really sat down with a Mac and gone over the various OS X UI parts to understand how and why the feel and work so well?

    • Funny, aside from the dijointed menu drop down on the Ubuntu screen shot, I find the Ubuntu looks much better. (Actually, KDE doesn't have that problem, just as a comparison - Actually, I'll take the look of KDE over OSX any day). I'll also keep my menu bars with my windows and not at the top of the screen, thanks.

      There were no menu drop downs on the mac screen shot, but I know what those look like, and I know they are better done.
    • by Mattintosh (758112) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @01:00PM (#18800317)
      First off, I don't think your post is flamebait. Screw the mods.

      Second of all, I like the look of Ubuntu's default Gnome environment almost as much as the Mac OS X 10.4 UI. But here are the differences I notice:

      First of all, the bad:
      - Look at the buttons on the window title bars in Ubuntu. Especially that annoying catch-all menu on the left side. Notice how the space around the button is wider on the top and left than it is on the bottom. That just looks sloppy. Mac OS has never had this sort of problem in a final release.
      - Where is my quick-access-but-not-a-desktop-icon method of launching an app? Mac OS has had one for over a decade. There were pop-up folders (tabs), tabbed launch apps, and now there's the Dock (though I prefer the old categorized tabs, myself). Even Windows, that paragon of UI anti-design, has Quick Launch bars. I guess you could call the hierarchic menu a "fast launch" menu, since it's still faster than manually navigating to the folder and running the app or typing the path/app into a CLI. But I never considered that a quick-access method on Mac OS even when you could stick stuff into the Apple menu. Hierarchic menus are just too finicky... OH WAIT. There it is. Sorry, but there's a reason that the Mac mouse was one-button for all those years, even in the face of heavy criticism. Relying on a right-click for what should be basic system functions is just poor practice. I've been running Ubuntu for a while now, and this screenshot was the first I'd seen of the aforementioned feature.
      - A system-wide menubar is really a nice thing. You can't click another app's menus without switching to that app anyway, so why even give the option? Plus, it frees up screen real-estate for other things. You'd be amazed how much space is wasted by all those menubars, especially the ones that consist of just File, Edit, View. Move all that crap to one place. And yes, I do understand that it takes some getting-used-to and that people are resistant to change. Especially Linux geeks. Try it for a month and I'll guarantee you won't go back. It's the same challenge we all issue to Windows users, and what's good for the goose...
      - And one final note: thank goodness the Apple folks have finally realized that brushed metal looks like ass. Now if we could just get back to a standardized look and feel...

      And the good:
      - As I mentioned before, a standard look and feel. Ubuntu has that. Given, it's baby-turd brown, but at least it's consistent. And I'm sure there are themes to change the colors (and given my first criticism above, hopefully the layout). Note that the "themes" issue is another failing of the Mac OS in its current incarnation. It's also quite a sore issue with Apple, I fear, so any official resolution is unlikely.
      - The shut-down button is awesome. On a Mac, you can just bonk the power button and invoke the "sleep, restart, shut down, or cancel?" dialog, but on generic PC hardware, you can't always do that. Often, the case's faceplate is gone, exposing little sharp plastic nubs instead of a nice power button. Sometimes the damn thing is under your desk and just out of reach. Sometimes it's in a server locker 1000 miles away. Being able to shut down the OS using an always-accessible power button icon is just really damned nice.
      - Multiple desktops. Windows doesn't have it. Mac OS doesn't have it. (Third-party add-ons don't count.) Nothing more needs to be said. And the UI to switch between them is pure gold.

      And the Ugly? Just about everything Windows does. I would like to take this opportunity to beg the Linux/GNU/Gnome/KDE/whatever devs and contributors not to copy Windows. It's an ethical thing, really. Mistreatment of eyes is a horrible crime. Won't someone please think of MY EYES?!
  • Upgrade from 6.10 (Score:4, Informative)

    by raffe (28595) * on Thursday April 19, 2007 @09:59AM (#18797235) Journal
    I have just update my 6.10 vmware image running on my win xp to 7.04. Runs great. If you want to try to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04 open a terminal and enter
    gksu "update-manager -c -d" and follow instructions. As always, back up your computer fist. :-D
  • by moranar (632206) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:01AM (#18797265) Homepage Journal
    Help alleviate the load: use the torrents.
    • In fact, I'm using the torrents now. I love it when a release announcement on Slashdot goes up -- the more people downloading using the torrents, the faster it is for everyone.
  • Old news! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Otter (3800) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:02AM (#18797283) Journal
    I already heard this from Michael Dell.
  • Finally! (Score:3, Funny)

    by tygerstripes (832644) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:04AM (#18797295)
    At last, Ubuntu are all set to work on the release they really wanted to push: Generic Gnu!

    (Of course, it'll be a Gazelle, but hey.)

  • Thanks Mark (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:10AM (#18797385)
    Whatever we think about this man, we should thank him to have launched the Ubuntu Project. This is the first Linux distro that have the potential to succeed on the Desktop and to get some decent market share beside Windows and MacOS.
    • It's been my plan to replace Windows on my second PC with this Ubuntu release. The only problem I can forsee is setting up MythTV to work with my Radeon AIW. Either way it should make for a fun weekend project!
      • The only problem I can forsee is setting up MythTV to work with my Radeon AIW. Either way it should make for a fun weekend project!

        If by "fun weekend project," you mean "experience that will make you curse computers, question your own sanity, and shake your fist at God for not having struck you down with a well-placed lightning bolt before you set forth on this foolhardy endeavor," then yeah, sure, it might be a fun weekend project.

        But seriously, if you want MythTV to work, and work well, get hardware that'
  • System Requirements? (Score:3, Informative)

    by 2008 (900939) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:11AM (#18797409) Journal
    Based on the review this is worth upgrading to - but what are the system requirements like? 6.06 is just usable on my 196 meg RAM laptop, will this push it over the edge?

    Incidentally, how come SAMBA isn't included by default? This bit me recently when trying to move files between 2 networked (but not on the internet) computers.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by SomeGuyTyping (751195)
      on SAMBA, just begin to set up a share and synaptic will download and install the SAMBA components.


    • if you've a rt2500 based wireless card you might wanna get something else..

    • by Skye16 (685048)
      Possible security reasons? It's about the only thing I can think of.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mbrod (19122)
      Have you tried to run Xubuntu [xubuntu.org]? It runs xfce [xfce.org] as the window manager and is suppose to have lighter hardware requirements. I would wait a bit on trying to get that distro or even access their site as the entire Ubuntu world is getting slammed right now.
    • It uses shared libraries to better effect than Gnome. The result is a far lower memory requirement. It's also faster when it comes to display updates for some reason.

       
    • by bhsx (458600) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:59AM (#18798203)
      I've not tried 7.04 yet, but I have Xubuntu (the XFCE version) running just dandy on a 200MHz, 96MB RAM Toshiba Satellite 4010CDS. It does take a bit(39-60 seconds) to launch some apps, OO.o and Firefox specifically; but once launched they work just fine. Installation could have been smoother, but again, this is some pretty old hardware. I use it as a second web terminal on the coffee table when someone (wife, step-daughter) is on the main PC. If I were you I'd wait for the Feisty version of Xubuntu.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:12AM (#18797415)
    On freenode,

    #ubuntu = 1600 users
    #ubuntu-release-party = 850 users

    In the last hour, these have both gone up by around 100-200 each. 24hrs ago, #ubuntu-release-party had 20 people.

    Apparently this is a new record for the freenode IRC network!

    Forget whether or not ubuntulinux.org can remain online, everyone start praying for the poor folk at freenode :)
  • UbuntuStudio (Score:2, Interesting)

    by SomeGuyTyping (751195)
    I'm excited about this release mainly because UbuntuStudio was supposed to come out with Feisty. I'm looking forward to having a maintained and stable realtime kernel for audio work
  • by Rik Sweeney (471717) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:33AM (#18797737) Homepage
    and the next one...

    Bring on Version 9: Hungry Hungry Hippo!
  • I might wanna try this on my WinXP laptop as dual-boot.
    Can anybody tell me if it's possible to remove Ubuntu from the dual-boot later?
    Just like to have a backup options. Otherwise I'd have to go through the pain of imaging my harddisk first.

    Also, I currently use Outlook Express on both laptop and desktop, with the laptop install pointing to a shared folder on the desktop. Is there any Linux application which is able to natively work with an Outlook Express e-mail folder. Or would I be able to share e-mail i
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by staticsage (889437)
      If you download the Alternate Install CD, you can choose where to install grub. Install it to a floppy or usb drive and you can use that file with the windows boot loader. This way if you want to remove the Ubuntu partitions in the future you won't have to worry about fixing the boot loader. It's been a while since I've done this, but this looks about right: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=56723 [ubuntuforums.org]
  • Java (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Vexorian (959249) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @10:49AM (#18798041)
    I don't like Java too much but I really think that although ubuntu may be rushing it (since Java has not been GPLed yet) linux and Java may make a great alliance, let's face it, linux has the issue that windows programs don't work on it, even with WINE there are issues sometimes, and Java's main selling point (cross platform-ness ) doesn't quite work with the current operating system monopoly situation. The only thing we needed to start improving the situation was a distribution that comes with sun's Java installed by default, these are great news.
  • What's new? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by digitalderbs (718388) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:09AM (#18798351)
    I always find it difficult to get a summary on the new features to help me decide if I should upgrade. These are the results from my searches :

    1. 18 month support term
    2. Better installation, includes migration tools for mail and such from Windows and linux partitions.
    3. Improved wireless support with Avahi
    4. Easier third party codec/firmware/driver installation, including Nvidia and ATi proprietary drivers and mp3 codecs.
    5. Two new games : glches and soduko
    6. Compiz/Beryl support for desktop 3D effects (not default)
    7. Beagle (search indexed), Tomboy (note tacking program, sticky notes) and F-Spot (photo management.. alternatively called G-spot, depending on the type of photos).
    8. java

    sources : blog 1 [sabza.org], blog 2 [blogspot.com]
    I already have all of these setup on Edgy, so I won't upgrade.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by ror (1068652)
      You can just "upgrade" by changing a word in a config file somewhere, there's no reinstallation involved; You'll just be bumped with a few programs to download and you're done, there's little reason *not* to.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      The improved wireless support comes from network-manager not avahi, avahi is a service for automatically discovering network services on your local network.

      Tomboy and f-spot at least, were included in Ubuntu 6.10.

      There are *lots* of small incremental improvements in Ubuntu, that's the benefit of 6 month release plan. Some of them are detailed here: http://philbull.livejournal.com/34930.html [livejournal.com] There are also a list of improvements from Gnome 2.18 here: http://www.gnome.org/start/2.18/notes/en/ [gnome.org]

      I imagine the new
  • Livecd goodness (Score:4, Informative)

    by elmartinos (228710) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @03:11PM (#18802581) Homepage
    I am posting this from the same computer on which currently Ubuntu is installing. Beat that, windows!

1 Mole = 25 Cagey Bees

Working...