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Novell Software Linux

Novell to Standardize on GNOME 599

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the rollin-with-my-gnomies dept.
Motor writes "In what must be one of the least unexpected announcements of recent times, Novell says that they are standardizing on one desktop rather than supporting two different codebases. From the article: 'Novell is making one large strategic change. The GNOME interface is going to become the default interface on both the SLES (SuSE Linux Enterprise Server) and Novell Linux Desktop line. KDE libraries will be supplied on both, but the bulk of Novell's interface moving forward will be on GNOME.'"
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Novell to Standardize on GNOME

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  • by bbrazil (729534) <brian.brazil@gmail.com> on Saturday November 05, 2005 @03:29PM (#13958656) Homepage
    http://www.kubuntu.org/ [kubuntu.org] is one option.
  • by saterdaies (842986) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @03:37PM (#13958718)
    Mandriva is still firmly standardized on KDE.
  • Re:Management (Score:5, Informative)

    by craXORjack (726120) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @03:45PM (#13958761)
    A company that stays in business does what is necessary to keep costs down. If you read the article:

    The GNOME interface is going to become the default interface on both the SLES (SuSE Linux Enterprise Server) and Novell Linux Desktop line.

    All that is happening is that the distributions they are pushing to corporations will use Gnome as the default. Big deal. SuSE Personal/Professional/whatever will continue as normal.

  • Re:nuts (Score:5, Informative)

    by diegocgteleline.es (653730) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @04:16PM (#13958912)
    How come gnome, which is not *that* much superior to kde (some would argue that it's inferior at the moment) is making all the headway?

    Usability. It's that simple.

    I mean, it's not the lack of a kparts equivalent, being programmed in a 70's language - c++ is a bad OO language, but C is much worse as "OO language" still gnome went with C (and you have to admit those even if you're a gnome zealot)

    Fortunately, KDE 4.0 is focusing in usability. The reasons that keeps many people away from KDE is usability, anything else. KDE is great, in some aspects their technology is ahead of other desktops and not just gnome (I love kparts). Bring usability to kde (ie: wait for kde 4.0) and you'll see lots of users switching to kde
  • by marchetta (875167) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @04:37PM (#13959020)
    Ximian originally founded by Ventures Capital + Sun contracts + IBM have a lot a hidden power PR guys smart engineers (Miguel Nat ) cool applications (beagle ifolder mono ecc ) cool gnome patches (gnome-panel with rounded edges stripe image into the menu and so on ) cool core gnome developers from nautilus (Dave Camp) to Evolution to bonobo ecc Novell has choosen Gnome as default desktop because they can lead the development thanks to theirs key developers.
  • by Qbertino (265505) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @04:51PM (#13959109)
    I'd pick KDE. KDE is more consitent than Gnome and does a better job at ridding the crappyness of the x86 Linux Desktop anachonisims, such as XFrees ancient non-existant Font management or the lack of XFree clipboard usage. Since 3.0 KDE just says "GIMME THAT! I'll take care" and gone are two major anoyances of the pure OSS Desktop. Be it that it weighs heavier than Gnome but if todays systems can take such behemoths as XP, Mac OS X, then they shure can handle KDE.

    I actually find Gnome prettier and less clutsy in apperance and I dislike the fact that default KDE apes the crappiness of Windows Keybindings, but on the other hand I love KDEs easy configurability. The utility libs are, afaict, more sophisticated (example: editor widget) and KWin has evolved from a joke of a WM it was to a solid foundation for KDE. Unlike Gnome the KDE people don't change their core WM every odd month - in the end it paid off.

    This is the general impression I've had about KDE/Gnome the last two years. I've actually wondered why Ubuntu uses Gnome as default. From what I can tell, the core Gnome team members are probably better at advocacy than the KDE people. That could be the reason.

    One last indicator makes the last solid point:
    The reality is that I miss an awfull lot in a pure Gnome enviroment, but I nearly miss nothing in a pure KDE setup.
  • Re:There were signs (Score:3, Informative)

    by canuck57 (662392) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @04:54PM (#13959131)

    Proprietary Qt libraries? I've got news for you: QT is GPL licensed as well.

    Closer to QPL, read the following to understand more...

    http://www.ofb.biz/modules.php?name=News&file=arti cle&sid=364&mode=&order=0&thold=0 [ofb.biz]

    The short if it is:

    A smooth roadmap ought to include licensing and other non-technical concerns along with the technology. Unless KDE can get Trolltech to release Qt/X11 under the LGPL, or at least get a guarantee that Qt/Commercial licenses will never go above a certain price and never have any more restrictions in usage than the present EULA has, the roadmap will always have a certain air of uncertainty to long-term enterprise decision makers.

    By Timothy R. Butler Editor-in-Chief, Open for Business July 05, 2005, 22:32:41 EDT

  • Re:Management (Score:3, Informative)

    by kayen_telva (676872) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @04:56PM (#13959139)
    heres the deal: it says the novell linux desktop, which is a distinct product from SuSe Pro or OpenSuSE

    here is a tip, NLD has always been Gnome. So basically, SLES is going gnome. BFD.

    kde is not going away in OpenSuSE (the replacement for SuSe Pro)

    holy crap, the GP is modded interesting.. its like talking to a wall

    "The entire KDE graphical interface and product family will continue to be supported and delivered on OpenSuSE," said Mancusi-Ungaro.

    wtf has happened to reading comprehension in the 21st century ?
    or, a better question, why do I even try talking to slashbots even more ?
  • by moranar (632206) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @05:38PM (#13959359) Homepage Journal
    Your post is correct except for the part about mandriva being firmly standardized on KDE.

    Mandriva offers both KDE and GNOME (and a host of other WMs) and molds both to its particular interface, "galaxy" using themes, patches and other stuff. The Mandriva tools (Drakxtools) are written using GTK. So I don't see it as "standardized on KDE".
  • KDE must-have apps (Score:5, Informative)

    by billybob2 (755512) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @05:59PM (#13959492)
    I think a lot of Suse customers will not be so pleased.

    Of course SUSE customers won't be pleased. There are many must-have desktop apps built on the KDE framework that don't have any good gtk equivalents:

    AmaroK music player [kde.org] -- Steve Jobs' nightmare, the single greatest threat to Itunes on the Free Software platform.

    DigiKam [digikam.org] -- The most feature-rich application for digital photo management.

    Konqueror File Manager" [konqueror.org] -- Embeded image/PDF/music/video viewing (via KMPlayer [kde.org]) and a tree-view arrangement of the filesystem familiar to Windows users (Nautilus doesn't come anywhere close)

    Seamless, transparent network file access [kde.org] on SMB, FTP, SSH and WebDav networks from _any_ KDE application.

    Kaffeine [sourceforge.net] -- The most polished FOSS movie player.

    Baghira [sourceforge.net] -- A native QT style that faithfully imitates OS X eyecandy, aimed at new users coming from the Mac world.

    KDE and QT also make up a technically superior platform for developers, drastically lowering the learning curve for programmers new to FOSS development. KDE apps can be built from the ground up using the best development tools in the Free Software world (which also happen to be built on QT/KDE):

    QT designer [trolltech.com] for GUI development

    Kdevelop [kdevelop.org] for syntax highliting, application templates, and project organization.

    BKSys environment [freehackers.org]for a complete replacement of the autotool chain (libtool+automake+autoconf+make) that will make dependency a whole lot more simpler and efficient.

    Gnome is way behind KDE with regards to these features. The only reason Redhat's doing so well with Gnome is because they're targeting geeky sysadmins who don't care about having a good-looking desktop. The other 99% of the world does care, and gnome just doesn't fit the bill.
  • by poofyhairguy82 (635386) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @08:29PM (#13960202) Journal
    Why isn't using several monitors a Xorg issue instead of Gnome or KDE?

    It comes down to Xinerama support. I personally believe Gnome's window manager (metacity) does a little better with two screens than KDe's (kwin) but that just my opnion. They both do a million times better than Window XP's (which loves to maximize things over both screens).

  • by opkool (231966) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @08:37PM (#13960229) Homepage
    Mandriva, of course.

    KDE is the "default GUI" for a basic install, although Mandriva also comes with Gnome, IceWM and others.

    I use Mandriva/Mandrake since it has always provided such a great support for KDE, "everything just works" approach for hardware, easy system administration (both GUI or command-line) and urpmi, the best package manager for rpm. As good as "apt-get".

    Everybody seems so "Ubuntu" centric today, singing praise to Ubuntu's "new stuff"... when all that "new stuff" has been in Mandrake/mandriva since version 8.0 (and we've had 8.1, 8.2, 9.0, 9.1, 9.2, 10.0, 10.1, 10.2 and now 2006.0; one release every 6 months). So, you see, all that "new" stuff is "old news" for the Mandrake crowd.

    And then, KDE is an almost alien part of Ubuntu (Kubuntu)

    Ubuntu is all hype.

    Anyway, back to my boring Mandriva (yes, boring as all works, and all has been working for so long...)

    Peace
  • by a.ameri (665846) on Saturday November 05, 2005 @08:58PM (#13960331)

    Correct you are my friend. Honestly, what did Ximian bring to Novel in terms of actual products? What happened to Ximian Desktop, that lovely modified Gnome with a devilish monkey wallpaper? Have you heard anything about it? No, it's been discontinued. Do you remember their Red Carpet? That usless shi!t that was supposed to unify software deployments? What happened to it? It turned out that Novel already had a similar product, and so RC has been discontinued. And you know what, as lovely as that crashoholic buggy Evolution is, and Mono (which is going for a long catch-up phase with the releaasse of C# 2.0 and the new .Net framework) these are bringing a total of $0.00 in terms of revenue for Novel.

    Buying Ximian was a terrible mistake that Novel made during their hurry to jump into the Linux bandwagon. As if that was not enough, it seems that the Ximian guys now hold major positions in Novel, and have been put into positions to be able to kill SUSE's especial relationship with the KDE community. As other's have mentioned, SUSE was only strong in Europe, and in Europe, desktop Linux means KDE. I know that the Munich municipality is definitly going to have a strong word with SUSE about this.

    I'm sure this won't affect KDE much. KDE just gets better with every release, and with 4.0, it will put all those usability criticisms to rest once and for all. But I do know that this will affect SUSE. The whole YAST2 is written with Qt, and it will be a massive redundant job to rewrite the whole thing in Gtk+. Also, this probably means that SUSE 10.0 was the last release that I bought, and I know I am not alone in this boat. Happy gconf hacking SUSE!

  • by digidave (259925) on Sunday November 06, 2005 @12:16AM (#13961024)
    It's a shame to see KDE become such an outcast because they have done many things better than Gnome.

    1. KParts
    2. Kate
    3. Konqueror (file manager)
    4. KHTML (browser)
    5. KControl and its new System Settings replacement
    6. Integrating Super Karamba into desktop

    While Gnome has made some colossal errors in judgement.

    1. Removing the menu editor (just back in newest version)
    2. Forcing 'spacial' Nautilus as the default before anybody could even try it.

    Luckily, Kubuntu is still great :)

    I doubt KDE will die quickly, but it does seem the writing is on the wall. If major distros are really standardizing on Gnome I think KDE is too big a project to keep all the developers it needs. I hope KDE 4 + Plasma aren't affected by this move by Novell because it looks like KDE is much closer to an OS X-level desktop than Gnome is.
  • by subsolar2 (147428) on Sunday November 06, 2005 @12:52AM (#13961147)

    Correct you are my friend. Honestly, what did Ximian bring to Novel in terms of actual products? What happened to Ximian Desktop, that lovely modified Gnome with a devilish monkey wallpaper? Have you heard anything about it? No, it's been discontinued.


    Mostly true ... XD is pretty much not needed since those changes have gone into mainstream Gnome.


      Do you remember their Red Carpet? That usless shi!t that was supposed to unify software deployments? What happened to it? It turned out that Novel already had a similar product, and so RC has been discontinued.


    Well Red Carpet basically just got renamed "Zen for Linux" the product still exists.


    And you know what, as lovely as that crashoholic buggy Evolution is, and Mono (which is going for a long catch-up phase with the releaasse of C# 2.0 and the new .Net framework) these are bringing a total of $0.00 in terms of revenue for Novel.


    FUD ... the devlopment version of mono already implement 99% of C# 2.0.


    Buying Ximian was a terrible mistake that Novel made during their hurry to jump into the Linux bandwagon. As if that was not enough, it seems that the Ximian guys now hold major positions in Novel, and have been put into positions to be able to kill SUSE's especial relationship with the KDE community. As other's have mentioned, SUSE was only strong in Europe, and in Europe, desktop Linux means KDE. I know that the Munich municipality is definitly going to have a strong word with SUSE about this.


    Well currently Gnome is *better* than KDE for Enterprise use especially with it's Accessibility features which are a requirement for government use. The licensing of the core libraries is much more GNOME friendly for integration with proprietary enterprise apps also. For their target audience, corporate & government organizations (not hobbyist), it's a better choice than KDE.

    I very much doubt that Munich will say anything to Novell.


    I'm sure this won't affect KDE much. KDE just gets better with every release, and with 4.0, it will put all those usability criticisms to rest once and for all. But I do know that this will affect SUSE. The whole YAST2 is written with Qt, and it will be a massive redundant job to rewrite the whole thing in Gtk+. Also, this probably means that SUSE 10.0 was the last release that I bought, and I know I am not alone in this boat. Happy gconf hacking SUSE!


    I'm sure your wrong .... with Novell sponsering less KDE development and more GNOME it's likely that the situation will go the other way. My guess is that they will replace YAST2 with something completely different, probably written in Mono that integrates with eDirectory/LDAP.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 06, 2005 @01:39AM (#13961277)
    You're joking, right? Not only does Pango provide amazing internationalization support, GNOME is ahead in accessibility support.
  • by billybob2 (755512) on Sunday November 06, 2005 @02:18AM (#13961361)
    Some more must-have KDE/QT desktop applications:

    K3b [k3b.org] -- Best CD and DVD authoring program with intuitive wizards, on the fly transcoding between WAV, MP3, FLAC, and Ogg Vorbis, normalization of volume levels, CDDB, DVD Ripping and DivX/XviD encoding, Save/load projects, automatic hardware detection/calibration and much more.

    Klik [atekon.de] -- Gives non-expert access to bleeding edge versions of apps without requiring any compilation or permanent installation.

    KDE Control Center [kde.org] -- Centralized location for desktop control. Controls _all_ common aspects of the KDE applications: language, power settings, special effects, icon and window themes, shadows, shortcuts, printers, privacy, etc. This is what makes KDE so well integrated -- all KDE apps respect changes made here, so they all have the same feel. SUSE has even made YAST a module of the KDE control center so users can access distro-specific settings from here. Compare this to the dismembered approach Red Hat (and other gnome distros) have been forced to adopt in the absence of a centralized gnome control center. (ie. a bunch of individial programs named redhat-config-**** that nobody can ever remember)

    Wireless Assistant [kde-apps.org] -- Most user-friendly app for connecting to wireless networks. Managed Networks Support, WEP Encryption Support, Per Network (AP) Configuration Profiles, Automatic (DHCP, both dhcpcd and dhclient) and manual configuration options, Connection status monitoring, etc

    MythTV [mythtv.org] -- The most advanced analog and digital TV viewer/recorder in the Free Software world (built using QT).

    KDE Education [kde.org] -- Educational (Science, Literature, Geography, etc) programs for children. Could play a big role in whether school districts decide to use Free Software in their classrooms.

    Quanta [kdewebdev.org] -- Rich web development environment for PHP, CSS, DocBook, HTML, XML, etc with advanced context sensitive autocompletion, internal preview and more.

    Cervisia [kde-apps.org] -- User-friendly GUI frontend for CVS.

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