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Debian Software Linux

Ubuntu Beware: Installing Debian with Anaconda 43

Posted by timothy
from the hey-we're-all-in-the-same-gang dept.
Chris writes "Progeny Linux does Debian one step better. If you like Ubuntu you'll love Progeny. A slick GNOME desktop, a solid Debian core, and the Anaconda installer have made Progeny my new desktop of choice. Progeny has also recently become part of the Linux Core Consortium (LCC) to implement Linux Standard Base (LSB) 2.0. Watch your back Ubuntu for Progeny's new 'Progeny Debian 2.0 Developer Edition RC1' release. At OSDir we just had to install this distro, and take some screenshots. Our screenshot tour will take you from boot, through the installation, to the desktop. Then we'll have a look at the taskbar, menus, system configuration, and a few of the newly added features of this great distro."
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Ubuntu Beware: Installing Debian with Anaconda

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  • pleasures of OSS (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ilyaa1 (831859)
    Looking at those screenshots, it's interesting how the installer, for instance, is essentially copied from RedHat. I suppose that's the pleasure of OSS - you can take the best of what's around, and if you know a better way to put it all together - do it.
    • Looking at those screenshots, it's interesting how the installer, for instance, is essentially copied from RedHat. That may be true, but that installer is based on GNOME anyway, so it's not as if RedHat had done anything truly original with it anyway. They simply applied the widely used desktop environment to their installation.
    • Looking at those screenshots, it's interesting how the installer, for instance, is essentially copied from RedHat.

      Did you even read the article headline?
      • To clarify, Anaconda is Red Hat's installer... Check the Wikipedia article here [wikipedia.org]. Note that the article actually mentions Progeny, as well as a Gentoo distro using the installer. The inspiration for the name was pretty cool, as well. Some other child of the grand-parent implied that Anaconda was 'Gnome based', and I believe they meant GTK...
      • ok, good point...
  • Difference much? (Score:4, Informative)

    by jgaynor (205453) <[jon] [at] [gaynor.org]> on Monday November 22, 2004 @11:40PM (#10895017) Homepage

    Pardon me but I don't see much of a difference here . . .

    1) Debian
    2) Gnome
    3) Easy installation
    4) Profit?

    So it's got LSB standardization - Yay. With an hour of work I bet you could turn either into the other. Why the hard sell? I'm not a fanboy of either but bickering about distros does nothing but fragment the userbase at large.

    In other news, by the time I'm done writing this someone will probably have posted why gentoo is superior to both of these.

    • Re:Difference much? (Score:5, Informative)

      by theantix (466036) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @02:07AM (#10895792) Journal
      You're right, the two projects have seemingly a lot in common with either other. So long as they both contribute bugfixes and upgrades back to Debian proper, does it really matter that the userbase is fragmented? If someone using Progeny Debian Gnome files a bug report that gets fixed back to Debian, which is also fixed in Ubuntu -- does it really matter to me that they weren't using Ubuntu?

      The fact is, these new Debian/Gnome distros (UserLinux too) are all working together. Any extra engineering and quality assurance that these distributions all provide should be appreciated by all the parties involved.
  • From Ian Murdock (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Jacked (785403)

    Not necessarily relevant, but, I find it interesting that Progeny was founded by the creator of Debian: Ian Murdock.

    Their web site: http://www.progeny.com/ [progeny.com]

  • Progeny seems like it's a fairly good distro, but for me, I'd rather stick with Ubuntu if I'm going to stray from a pure Debian install.

    Progeny's site (btw, a link in the article would have been nice, it's Progeny [progeny.com]) calls themselves "the linux platform company" and has a very conservative, professional (in a business sense) look. That's not for me. Ubuntu, on the other hand, is very human oriented. Looking at their site (Ubuntu [ubuntulinux.org]), the first thing they do is explain the name as, ""Ubuntu" is an ancient Africa
    • by reallocate (142797) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @07:37AM (#10896822)
      >> "This isn't like your standard corporate system where you have to root for your competitors to lose. With this diversity, we all win."

      Geez, I bet you feel so warm and fuzzy all over. Remind me never to hire you.

      Get a clue: Ubuntu is a product of the Canonical Corporation, as in "Corporation". It is backed by South African Mark Shuttlesworth, a rather wealthy guy you may have heard about when he bought a $20 million joyride to orbit. I have no reason to doubt his sincerity about all this "ubuntu philosophy" stuff, but it is a common advertising hook in South Africa.

      Linux distributions should be judged on their technical and aesthetic merits, not on the pseudo-philosophical image they project for PR purposes. (You do understand that Progeny's site is designed to appeal to the market they want to sell to, and that Ubuntu's site is designed to appeal to people like you? You're being manipulated in either case.)
      • Geez, I bet you feel so warm and fuzzy all over. Remind me never to hire you.

        Yes, I do feel "warm and fuzzy all over". Most of my personal use of computers is because I *ENJOY* it, not because it's some tool that I *must* use.

        As for hiring me, don't worry about it, if you're such an asshole, I'd quickly correct any such mistake if it were ever to occur.

        Get a clue: Ubuntu is a product of the Canonical Corporation, as in "Corporation". It is backed by South African Mark Shuttlesworth, a rather wealthy gu
        • >> Most of my personal use of computers is because I *ENJOY* it, not because it's some tool that I *must* use.

          Most people use computers for the same reason they use cars and refrigerators: as a means to an end, i.e., a tool.

          >> (Ubuntu) is designed and run in a human-centered fashion. I don't care if it's backed by a corporation as long as that corporation is run by people who want first and foremost to change the world for the better, and only secondarily want to bilk that world

          Ignoring
          • Most people use computers for the same reason they use cars and refrigerators: as a means to an end, i.e., a tool.

            So? My post didn't tell others what to pick, it stated what *I* pick.

            Ignoring the fact that a phrase like "human-centered fashion" is devoid of meaning,

            That you don't understand it, does not make it devoid of meaning. A "human-centered fashion" is one where, when a choice is presented, one would ask, "how does our choice benefit people?" instead of "how does our choice benefit [something o
            • >> ...instead of "how does our choice benefit [something other than people, like profits or delivery time, etc]?"

              Profits benefit people. That's why we want to make a profit. The only alternative is loss.

              >> also have a distro which has choices made that are things a person (namely, me) wants, instead of the types of choices a business wants.

              Fine. Although I've been using Ubuntu and don't see any of their choices leap out as significantly different than any other Debian-based distribution. Be
              • Profits benefit people. That's why we want to make a profit. The only alternative is loss.

                I never said profits are bad. In fact, I've already said they are good. Profits, however, are not the always best thing for people, which is what your simple Ayn Randian notion implies.

                Some profits are not good to take. Ford, for example, should have either taken a complete loss on the Pinto (and not released it), or taken *less* profits (there goes your premise) and fixed the exploding gas tank problem.

                Please tell
      • Linux distributions should be judged on their technical and aesthetic merits, not on the pseudo-philosophical image they project for PR purposes.

        And Ubuntu has many good technical merits to stand on. Its a wonderful mix of Fedora (easy to install, gnome based) and Debian (many packages that work, fast). If its not your thing, fine, but don't bite off someone's head for it.


        You do understand that Progeny's site is designed to appeal to the market they want to sell to, and that Ubuntu's site is designed t

  • The only benefit I see in this is maybe an easier install, for new users, but for those who already have a distro they're happy with, it certainly isn't a reason to switch.
  • Anyone hosting a torrent of this?
  • features ? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by kayen_telva (676872) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @12:26AM (#10895308)
    any humans install this yet ? the screenshot borgs dont dole out any real info ;) j/k
    does it have nice "control panels" like mandrake,
    suse and mepis have to setup various hardware and service options ?
    selinux ? support options ? apt-get and debian source compatibility ?
    visit the site right? already there. I'll let you know what I find..
  • by kayen_telva (676872) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @12:40AM (#10895376)
    from the progeny website:
    "aims to provide an unmatched "out of the box" environment for software
    developers building applications for the Java, Mono/.NET and LAMP platforms.
    "
  • Anyone who's installed Debian Sarge should realize that now Debian has the BEST tui in open source software. It was easy to use, gave me customizable options.

    No WAY would I give up the power of the new debian-installer to get the feel of anaconda.
  • I installed debian this way when it with the first time progeny was mentioned on slashdot. it made it easyer to install than using the old installer, and you had a full os installed in no time.

    With the new debian installer constantly being updated, i am starting to think progeny has missed it's chance. the new installer is far better than the old installer.
    though debian does not have a good graphcal wizard based installer like anaconda, it is rapidly improveing, with a gtk+ based installer underway. making
  • by dasunt (249686)

    With all the griping about Debian's installer, I wonder how many times one actually installs a new distro on bare metal.

    I have the same debian installation going for the past three years. Sure, I've upgraded the distribution to the latest stable release, but it didn't require a reinstallation, only an apt-get dist-upgrade.

    The debian installer may not be the easiest installer around, but it works on all the platforms out there, and the main objection -- dselect -- isn't difficult if you RTFM [debian.org]

    • Depends. If you are working as IT technician in a company, you might find yourself installing something on a box reasonably frequently. On the other hand you would be installing it "for a reason" so you probably will end up with SuSE/Redhat for Oracle or (insert commercial product here). Same for desktops.

      If you are installing it for home, you might find (like you) you don't have to wipe your workstation so often but I have a spare PC for just this reason, installing new stuff, tinkering around. So I instal

      • Depends. If you are working as IT technician in a company, you might find yourself installing something on a box reasonably frequently. On the other hand you would be installing it "for a reason" so you probably will end up with SuSE/Redhat for Oracle or (insert commercial product here). Same for desktops.

        For debian servers in an IT environment, my impression is that most people skip dselect and install what they want through apt-get. Its trivial to make a quick list of packages you want on every ser

  • A little more info (Score:4, Interesting)

    by JavaRob (28971) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @02:56AM (#10895976) Homepage Journal
    I jumped over to the Progeny Linux website [progeny.com] and found no mention of much of anything useful... you click on Products and Services and they just mention they provide security fixes for old RedHat distros. Okay...
    Here's their actual download page for the ISOs, [componentizedlinux.org] and the distro description page [componentizedlinux.org]. It mentions a bit more about what you're getting -- for one, this is RC-1 (not the release yet). More detail:
    Progeny Debian 2.0 Developer Edition aims to provide an unmatched "out of the box" environment for software developers building applications for the Java, Mono/.NET and LAMP platforms. Progeny Debian 2.0 Developer Edition also serves as a showcase for Componentized Linux and includes all Componentized Linux technologies. As such, it is also an excellent development platform for builders of Componentized Linux based custom distributions.
    I'm probably going to try it out (I'm a Java and LAMP developer..); I might wait for the release, though.
  • Vs. Ubuntu (Score:3, Interesting)

    by dorward (129628) on Tuesday November 23, 2004 @01:46PM (#10900113) Homepage Journal
    Ubuntu has a pretty transparent development process (yeah for mailing lists and development sources lists for apt) and is promising a regular (and reasonably frequent) release cycle.

    I don't see mention of anything like this for Progeny yet. So its less attractive then Ubuntu to me right now.

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