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Red Hat Software Businesses Operating Systems Software Linux

Fedora Core 3: What's in store? 29

Posted by timothy
from the lots-of-shots dept.
Chris writes "To give you a feel for what to expect in Core 3, we've done 120 screenshots of a full installation of Fedora Core 3 Test 3. Our screenshots include Gnome, KDE, and XPce interfaces. This is the last planned test release before the final release, scheduled for November 1."
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Fedora Core 3: What's in store?

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  • by i621148 (728860) on Wednesday October 13, 2004 @08:33AM (#10512907) Homepage
    what reason do we have for upgrading now? these rapid release schedules are TOO rapid. i have stopped even looking for binary rpms anymore.

    • Do you need to be on the cutting edge?

      I'm still using a nearly 1 year old setup of Debian. Other than some security updates, I haven't played with it much. Why bother? It's just a pure hassle.

      • I do play with it. I set up a local mirror at my home, in which I download every night the updates of the packages.

        I use this to automatically upgrade all my UML instances that I am running, and also to easily upgrade my portables and my father's computer (from my portable).

        I haven't seen much breakage in more than 6 months of mirroring, occasionally postfix which cannot be automatically configured, but that's all.

        I think that the community around Fedora should do the same, or maybe they do that already.

    • The use RHEL or one of it free counterparts [whiteboxlinux.org].
      6 moths or so schedule isn't that uncommon or rapid btw.
      • I installed Centos 3 on a two-way Xeon Dell server, which works perfectly. No license/support costs (and no support of course) but it works fine, running Oracle and Tomcat on one of our test systems. I had the CDs lying around, SuSE SLES8 wouldn't boot out of the box and I didn't have any time to fix it. Works like a dream and stellar performance. I know it is mainly due to Redhat team but I found Centos a very good replacement for it. We're supposed to replace it with the 'company' distro (SuSE) but I can'
      • Because it's a major pain in the ass to install many multimedia apps on RHEL. We support the AS and WS versions in my office. Some dude wanted Xine installed, and I couldn't shoehorn those apps in (with RPMs anyway) no matter how hard I tried. Library dependency hell in it's worst form. :)

        Too bad the FreshRPMS crew doesn't support at least RHEL WS, but I understand that they can only handle so much. Their Fedora Core2 support is awesome, though. A call to apt-get and I can can install xine and mplaye

    • what reason do we have for upgrading now?

      Perhaps you have no reason for upgrading now; apart from anything else it depends what you're running at the moment. Personally I'm running Fedora Core 1, and since I missed 2 am planning on installing 3.

      these rapid release schedules are TOO rapid.

      That doesn't follow: having more releases doesn't force you to upgrade more often. What it does do is give you freedom to upgrade at times you choose.

      You might only want to upgrade every couple of years, but at th

      • That doesn't follow: having more releases doesn't force you to upgrade more often. What it does do is give you freedom to upgrade at times you choose.

        Actually, it does. Did you know that FC1 is already going into legacy mode, meaning no more updates for it? That just blows my mind. Granted, these people aren't paid for their work, so I can't complain - but if I were running an open source project like this I would commit to updates for atleast 2.5 years after product release, and I would release a new
        • having more releases doesn't force you to upgrade more often. What it does do is give you freedom to upgrade at times you choose.

          Actually, it does. Did you know that FC1 is already going into legacy mode, meaning no more updates for it?

          The principle of having frequent releases doesn't force upgrades in itself; a distrubutor dropping support does that, regardless of release frequency, and it isn't a reason for stating that frequent releases are bad.

          Yes, I do know that Red Hat don't support Fedora 1 an

        • All of that is completely mistaken. It does not mean no more updates. It means essentially nothing at all to the end user and to anyone who's not a core developer. It simply means the distro version migrates to being managed by the Fedora Legacy [fedoralegacy.org] project for updates. Besides that, any product needs a feature freeze upon initial release anyway, or else it's not a product. So security and bugfix updates will come for a very long time. Absolutely nothing to see here.
    • what reason do we have for upgrading now? these rapid release schedules are TOO rapid.

      Another reason for frequent releases is to cope with new hardware. The reason I'm running Fedora at all is because there's no chance of Debian Woody installing on kit I bought this year.

      So even if there's no reason for any existing installations to be upgraded, having frequent releases helps those who are installing on to newly purchased hardware.

      Smylers
    • 'cause looks are the reason we upgrade distros
    • I guess a lot of these replies are right on target. I should have switched to SUSE at the beginning of the whole RH to Fedora migration, but I already had all my config files all tweaked out. I really like FC2. I think i am just going to stay with it on the main server and live in the OS X laptop environment. Now if only they would come out with OS X for x86 :)
  • Make that XFce, not XPce.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Number 3 [osdir.com] is definately the best.

    What did they do, go a screen grab every time the screen changed?

    • lol, it looks like it... The first 35 pics are of the setup process, and then you get a screenshot showing EVERY SUBMENU of the main menu... two for those submenus that scroll... BOOORING!
  • Personally, as a heavy Gnome user, I think the changes in Gnome 2.8 alone are worth the new version of Fedora. I've been waiting for "File Types" to be fully functional for awhile. When you want bleeding edge, you have to have a rapid release cycle.
  • Irony (Score:5, Funny)

    by MarkedMan (523274) on Wednesday October 13, 2004 @09:38AM (#10513453)
    OK, this will get me modded to troll, but isn't there something so... Linux-like... about someone very enthusiastically trumpeting an information page that consists of (drum roll) 120 unlabeled links...
  • Our screenshots include Gnome, KDE, and XPce interfaces.

    And people wonder "Why Linux isn't on the desktop?"

    The Linux kernel is _almost_ ready for the desktop, but someone needs to put a stop to this "Desktop" insanity of 2 main "desktop environments" with some unknown number of other widgets and toolkits.

    If RH, or some other company would just say we are only going to support Gnome or KDE or preferably something else besides a windows knockoff, then we will have progress. And then only progress.

    Someon

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