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Transgaming releases "WineX" 4.0 "Cedega" 475

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the now-thats-a-strange-name dept.
visy writes "Transgaming has opened a new site at today and are announcing WineX 4.0, now dubbed Cedega after a unique variety of grape. Transgaming claims Cedega allows "Windows ® games to seamlessly and transparently run under Linux, out-of-the-box, with outstanding performance and equivalent game-play". Will we see a new era of game compatibilty?"
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Transgaming releases "WineX" 4.0 "Cedega"

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  • WINE (Score:4, Funny)

    by ChupaThePirate (752263) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:31AM (#9493674) Homepage
    does that mean that wine is now an emulator? ;-O
    • by essreenim (647659) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:10AM (#9494466)
      So my wuestion is about Avalon.
      In 05/06 Window$ will release a new OS with a brand nre API - Avalon - based on a completely new file system/table... WinFS (or whatever its called)

      I've no doubt they will make this the most convoluted file system ever seen with no chance of proper reverse engineering or even emulating.

      So, shouldnt we be pushing for new and smarer ways to develop more sophisticated OpenGL render engines faster and better so Linux can compete eith Window$ in gaming rather than living off M$ scraps? ...

      • by Doogie5526 (737968) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:27AM (#9494631) Homepage
        WinFS actually sits on top of NTFS (for backwards compatibility)... and I also think this was one of the many new technologies that are planned to be dropped from Longhorn (which is still many many years away).

        I think the point of this is to shut people up about, "The only reason I haven't switched is because I play games." After that, with more people on Linux, a Linux native version of a new game gets released, and it gains more support. Finally, more and more publishers look at making Linux versions.

        Hopefully, this will be set in to action before Longhorn is released (you know, right after Duke Nukem Forever).

        One more thing, I believe most games don't use too much anymore of the Windows API than the winmain() function (to run the app in windows). The rest is engine code or DirectX/OpenGL. So I doubt it will be that much of a problem when the day comes.

        I'm pretty sure it's still spelled "Windows" and "Microsoft." [penny-arcade.com] If they did change the name to "Window$," I'm pretty sure there'd be a Slashdot story on it.

  • New era (Score:4, Insightful)

    by PhilippeT (697931) <[philippet] [at] [gmail.com]> on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:32AM (#9493679)
    Will we see a new era of game compatibilty

    Or a new era of litigation
  • City of Heroes? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Anyone care to discuss how well City of Heroes runs under Wine and it's offspring?

    Some friends have been trying to get me to get a PC for this game, and I'd rather run Linux on it as opposed to Windows.
    • Yes, it does (Score:5, Informative)

      by SilentReproach (91511) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:41AM (#9494186)
      From the article:

      TransGaming's flagship Linux product, Cedega, supports hundreds of the hottest and most popular games on Linux, out-of-the-box, including hit titles such as Max Payne 2(TM), Battlefield 1942(TM), Battlefield Vietnam(TM), Medal of Honor(TM), Diablo II ®, EverQuest(TM), Star Wars Galaxies(TM), City of Heroes ® and many more. TransGaming has also ported such blockbuster titles as TRON 2.0 ®, James Bond 007(TM): Nightfire(TM), Law & Order(TM), Indiana Jones ® and The Emperor's Tomb(TM), just to name a few.


      I was a subscriber for many months, and quit my subscription. I cited that the only game I was interested in was SW Galaxies, and that until it was supported, I would no longer subscribe. I contributed a chunk of change, and now I'll have to put my money where my mouth is and re-subscribce to run the game I want.

  • I buy Codeweavers [codeweavers.com] products. They give back to the community, unlike Transgaming.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:35AM (#9493702)
      "The issue of contributing back to the community always shadows every open-source project. Transgaming does contribute back, but there are restrictions. You can see them in the statement from Transgaming's webpage:

      "The source code to TransGaming WineX (minus copy protection related code, for now) is available through VA Linux's SourceForge website. You can examine and modify it to your heart's content, you can watch the changes we make as we go, and you can participate in detailed development discussions on our mailing list. The only thing you can't do is redistribute WineX code for any commercial purpose. The WineX code is licensed under the Aladdin Free Public License, which prohibits commercial use of our work. If you wish to use WineX commercially, please contact our sales team to arrange for alternative licensing arrangements.

      Once we have reached our subscription goals, we plan to release all of the WineX source code under the Wine license, which will allow it to be directly integrated with the core Wine project code hosted at www.winehq.com. Until then, we will periodically submit selected portions of our code for integration with the Wine project.""
      • by etymxris (121288) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:41AM (#9493736)
        The only thing you can't do is redistribute WineX code for any commercial purpose.
        That's not software libre.

        Once we have reached our subscription goals, we plan to release all of the WineX source code under the Wine license, which will allow it to be directly integrated with the core Wine project code hosted at www.winehq.com.
        Yeah, they've been saying that they were going to release everything from the beginning. Remember the beginning? As soon as they got enough money, they were going to distribute it for free for everyone. Well, after many bought into that, the promise changed. They liked making a profit. Nothing wrong with that, but people don't like being deceived, even when the initial promises are so ill conceived.
        • by mahdi13 (660205) <icarus.lnx@gmail.com> on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:02AM (#9493884) Journal
          Are you saying that the CVS is incomplete? The only code that is 'removed' from the CVS is the CD-Copy-Protection code that is licensed and they are not allowed to distribute in a 'free source code' manner...

          Only the binaries that they distribute under their subscription includes this code. Is it so bad that
          A) they are trying to make ends meet (pay the bills)
          and
          B) keeping themselves from getting sued out of exisitance?
        • I like being deceived, especially by a company that makes producs that I have absolutely no use for (like someone who makes software that'll make my computer do things that are *way* cheaper and faster on a console game system).
        • by gavriels (55831) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @01:45PM (#9497117) Homepage
          Indeed, Cedega is not software libre. We've never claimed that it was. It's a commercial product that includes components dereived from Wine and ReWind.

          Despite that fact, and despite the fact that we have not yet reached the 20,000 subscriber number in our original plans, we have contributed and we continue to contribute to the Wine project in a number of substantial ways. These include major contributions or rearchitectures of: 2D DirectDraw, DirectSound, DirectInput, DCOM, RPC, the WIDL IDL compiler, and wininet code, including SSL support. Additionally, we continue to maintain the X11 licensed ReWind tree, we've contributed code for a DIB renderer, and the Shared Memory WineServer.

          Overall, we've contributed tens of thousands of lines of code under Open Source license term.

          In particular, our DCOM, RPC, and WIDL work - required for use of InstallShield based installer - is extremely substantial work, and we are actively continuing to contribute that work to Wine and ReWind. We have probably spent as much engineering efforts on this as we have on our closed source Direct3D support.

          If you want to see some of what we've contributed, just browse the wine-devel and wine-patches mailing lists.

          -Gav

          Gavriel State, Co-CEO & CTO
          TransGaming Technologies Inc
      • by AndrewRUK (543993) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:59AM (#9494376)
        The only thing you can't do is redistribute WineX code for any commercial purpose.

        While the license says that, consider what happened when Debian wanted to package it and include it in non-free. Transgaming asked Debian not to, with a threat to change the license to stop Debian distributing any future versions. Quoteth Gavriel State, Transgaming's CEO:
        If Debian goes ahead and packages WineX despite our request, we will have to evaluate how that is affecting our financial situation, and determine whether we should change our license to restrict any future binary-packaged redistribution, regardless of commercial or non-commercial intent. It would certainly be our preference not to have to do so.
        http://lists.debian.org/debian-devel/2002/05/msg02 463.html [debian.org]
        Gentoo removed WineX for similar reasons [gentoo.org].
      • by Greyfox (87712)
        I haven't been able to pull an update off the sourceforge web site in ages. Apparently they've moved the source code to their site and require you to agree to a license to get to the instructions on how to download it (CVS server names and passwords etc.)

        Winex used to run Lotus Notes better than the wine package Debian's unstable branch, but as of the last time I tried it, the one Debian had was about even. I'd like to think that by the time I end up on another IBM contract they'd have come to their sense

    • Support Wine (Score:2, Informative)

      by ospirata (565063)
      Codewearves gives back to community as much as Trasgaming: almost nothing.

      Don't forget that Codeweavers products are closed source, different from Transgaming.

      OK, Winex CVS version is not that compatible as commercial, but it is because of the proprietary parts.

      The only true OS project is Wine.
      • Re:Support Wine (Score:5, Informative)

        by Dave2 Wickham (600202) * on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:09AM (#9493926) Journal
        They have to release all of their changes to the WINE tree (under the LGPL - they use the current tree), and they do. They also hire developers to work on WINE, and this can get merged back into the public tree (depending on whether it's accepted into CVS).
        • Re:Support Wine (Score:3, Informative)

          by Zardus (464755)
          Transgaming doesn't use the current tree, though. They started out way before Wine was changed to LGPL and when the change happened, forked Wine to Rewind [sf.net] to avoid the LGPL. Since then they've been using the Rewind sources.

          I'm against what Transgaming is doing, but they are on sound legal footing open-source-wise, I think.
    • by SQLz (564901) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:30AM (#9494101) Homepage Journal
      I buy Codeweavers products. They give back to the community, unlike Transgaming.

      Go to Wine [winehq.com] website, download the full change log, and grep for @transagaming.com, then come back here and post an apology.

      • by Rushuru (135939) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:14AM (#9494496)
        Alright

        wget http://source.winehq.org/source/ChangeLog

        I count 14826 changelog entries
        $ grep @ ChangeLog | wc -l
        14826


        226 of which are from a transgaming employee
        $ grep -i @transgaming.com ChangeLog | wc -l
        226


        And 1701 for codeweavers
        $ grep -i @codeweavers.com ChangeLog | wc -l
        1701


        So Transgaming gave back a little after all. But not that much. I browsed the top transgaming changelog entries and they concerned relatively minor stuff, like fixes for alsa audio support.

        Sorry but I'm still convinced that Transgaming has been a bad wine citizen (the fact that the licence permitted it doesn't change my opinion), and that they were deceiving the community when they said they'd give back everything to wine after they reach a certain number of subscribers. I guess they have reached that number since they have not yet filed for bankruptcy.
        • by dubious9 (580994) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @12:46PM (#9496289) Journal
          Sorry but I'm still convinced that Transgaming has been a bad wine citizen (the fact that the licence permitted it doesn't change my opinion),

          Transgaming is a commerical venture. They need to secure a line of income. They do this by restricting access to precompiled binaries, amoungst other things. To get it easily you have to pay a nominal subscription: $60 a year. Now that's not alot. Without this subscription they wouldn't have a profit model and would probably desinagrate.

          Would you rather have them not do this venture at all? Or do you have another profit model that would alleviate what you criticize? For me the community benefits from their work: I can run Windows games under Linux. The OSS'ers may complain that they don't have full/libre access to the code, but if they had that, there wouldn't be a transgaming anyway. What do you want them to do?

          and that they were deceiving the community when they said they'd give back everything to wine after they reach a certain number of subscribers. I guess they have reached that number since they have not yet filed for bankruptcy.

          So just because they haven't yet, they're not going to? And they lied about it? Face it a pure software company just doesn't have a OSS profit model. Name one. Red Hat? Services, not software. Mozilla? Not a commerical entity, but backed by them. Come on, what would you have them do?
        • by Eskarel (565631)
          Transgaming provides a service. The question is whether that service is worth the money or not. Wine could quite easily have added directx support on their own, they didn't, anyone else could have gotten a group together and worked on getting it done, no one did, transgaming provides the ability to play most windows games on Linux, no one else has done so. If they want to charge a little bit of money for that, and people are willing to pay for it, good for them.
    • by dewke (44893)
      How is this "interesting"?

      Transgaming gives back. You're free to download their cvs product, install it, play games. If that isn't "giving back" I don't know what is. Hell you can read the source code if you wanted to.

      Oh, I get it, because you actually have to *pay* for the licensed version, that's not "giving back". Well, welcome to the real world. Everything is not free.
  • Too bad (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:34AM (#9493697)
    It's really a shame I won't ever get to use this, since Transgaming forced Gentoo to pull the packages for WineX from their distro.

    Will Transgaming ever learn to work with the open source community instead of mearly tolerating its existance as an annoying necessity to business?
    • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Insightful)

      by strange_harlequin (633866) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:39AM (#9493722) Homepage

      To be entirely fair, Transgaming didn't force gentoo to pull the packages, they asked them to pull the packages and gave their reasons. The gentoo developers respected that and complied.

      You (and I) may disagree with Transgaming's reasons, but saying that they "forced" gentoo to pull the packages is unfairly implying harsh measures on Transgaming's part.

      • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Insightful)

        by jarrettwold2002 (601633) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:53AM (#9493821)
        I just have this feeling of eerie double standard when it comes to open source. Microsoft sends a cease and desist letter (which is corporate for 'would you kindly remove 'x'') and the mighty winds of geek fury are raised. An open source developer does functionally the same thing, and it is laid in the 'it was justified' category.

        Am I the only one that thinks that many corporate giants are not evil's kinsmen and don't ride a pale horse, and occasionally get things correct?

        This is my observation and is only tangentially related to the parent.

        • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Too bad they didn't do "functionally the same thing" - if you'd taken the trouble to have a browse through Wine's source code, you'd see a slew of contributions from Transgaming.

          This is *my* observation, and *directly* related to the parent in the interests of clearing up an instant judgement/misconception.
        • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Insightful)

          by G-funk (22712)
          Am I the only one that thinks that many corporate giants are not evil's kinsmen and don't ride a pale horse, and occasionally get things correct?

          Here? Pretty much.
        • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Informative)

          by SQLz (564901) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:35AM (#9494142) Homepage Journal
          The main problem was that people were downloading the CVS version (which did not contain any of the main features of WineX) and then giving others the wrong idea about WineX, namely that it didn't work. Not to mention, CVS is a developers tool for version control, not a method of mass distribution.

          Hardly any games ran with the CVS version at all anyway. You need the commerical version to do anything.
        • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Insightful)

          by gaijin99 (143693) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:50AM (#9494296) Journal
          I think you're misinterperating, and making a C&D sound nicer than it is. A C&D is not a polite request to stop, it is a statement that if you do not immediately comply with their demands then they will sue you. Essentially its a threat, not a request. When you get threatened by a corporation known to use lawsuits to crush competition, not to mention a legal budget that is bigger than you really want to think about, I'd argue that its different from getting a non-threat letter saying "would you please stop that? Here's why we don't want you to keep doing this".
          Am I the only one that thinks that many corporate giants are not evil's kinsmen and don't ride a pale horse, and occasionally get things correct?
          I don't think that they're evil necessarially, but they are powerful, and mostly uncontrolled. If you get in the way of their profits they will do everything they can to crush you (see entries under MS's use of SCO against Linux for a nice example). That isn't evil, any more than its evil for a polar bear to eat a penguin. But the penguins don't like it.

          To totally sidetrack, and leave animal analogies behind, I simply think that corporate power is being alowed to run amok, the current trend towards more and bigger mergers is probably a bigger threat to capitalism than communism ever dreamed of being. I view any concentration of power as a potential threat to individual liberties. Government concentrations of power were pretty closely monitored (until 9/11 and the USA PATRIOT act anyway, these days it seems as if anything goes), but corporate power is largely ignored by those who worry about liberty; despite the fact that corporations can trounce your liberties as much as the government can. On a total side note, I'll add that corporations aren't the only group to worry about, guilds, unions, etc are also potential threats. A group has more power than an individual, thus any group can *potentially* be a threat to individual liberty. There are occasional extremely powerful individuals, but they're the exception not the rule. I'm not a fear case who goes around seeing threats to my liberty everywhere, I just have a healthy degree of concern.

          • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Funny)

            by silicon not in the v (669585) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:45AM (#9494809) Journal
            That isn't evil, any more than its evil for a polar bear to eat a penguin. But the penguins don't like it.
            Don't say penguins preciousss. It hurts us, yes it doesss. Say...shark eats fish--yessss, nice fisssshhhh.
          • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Dalcius (587481)
            You make sense, but I think your comparison fails:

            "the fact that corporations can trounce your liberties as much as the government can."
            1) Corporations don't back up their threats with guns, as the government does. They can attempt to stomp on your 'rights' on the scale that the government can, but they are not able to force you to do anything.

            "Government concentrations of power were pretty closely monitored (until 9/11"
            2) Not really. Look back to McCarthy, et. al. and the big name court cases. It
          • Re:Too bad (Score:4, Funny)

            by sydb (176695) <michael@wELIOTd21.co.uk minus poet> on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @02:07PM (#9497391)
            That isn't evil, any more than its evil for a polar bear to eat a penguin. But the penguins don't like it.

            Not evil, but definitely unlikely.

            Polar Bears - Arctic. Penguins - Antarctic!

    • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Insightful)

      by xoran99 (745620)
      Just because you can't emerge it doesn't mean it can't be installed the old fashioned way, right?
    • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Informative)

      by gspr (602968) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:41AM (#9493741)
      I understand what you're saying, but Gentoo hasn't pulled all WineX packages from Portage. Transgaming forced them to remove the packages that fetched the open part of WineX from CVS and built it. If you are a Transgaming subscriber and use their binaries, there are still ebuilds for you.
      I see your point though.
    • Re:Too bad (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      It's trivially easy to grab the WineX CVS sources with a custom ebuild. Just search forums.gentoo.org and it'll be in your face in less time than it took you to write that gimmie, gimmie, gimmmieeeee MOOMMMY message *sighs*.
    • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Informative)

      by srwalter (39999) * on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:43AM (#9493754) Homepage Journal
      Transgaming only forced Gentoo to remove links to their CVS archive, which is publicly accessible. Their business model is based upon selling subscriptions to end users who want their product. The CVS repository is only there for developers, and they encourage developers to use it. Transgaming's argument is that having an ebuild that pulls from their CVS undermines their business model by giving end-users a free (as in beer) option to get releases.

      Now, if they really wanted to be jerks, they could have just shut down their public CVS access. Seems to me, however, that politely asking (they didn't sue or anything) Gentoo to remove the ebuilds in question was a much nicer alternative. Could you explain what's wrong with this, exactly?
      • They Didn't Sue? (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Inhibit (105449)
        Excuse me, but how on earth would you sue someone for accessing a public CVS archive for the purpose of downloading a CVS build? Remember now, you (the user) access it with an ebuild, not the Gentoo group.

        What would the argument be, exactly? "You're honor, we only meant that CVS tree for people that wanted to do free work, not everyone else. That's why we made it publicly available"? They essentially threatened to pull the CVS tree if Gentoo didn't remove their ebuild. Real nice. HUGE believers in OS
    • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Insightful)

      I've been wondering... IF Wine is a LGPL-ed product, then how can WineX exist without source code? I might be horribly wrong here, but doesn't the LGPL, like the GPL, force the creators of derivative works to make the source code available? I know they can just sod it all and only include sources with every CD they sell, that'd their right. But the person receiving that source code has the right to distribute it then, iirc.

      Then again, it's the LGPL, so there might be something involved here that I'm not

      • Re:Too bad (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        The original wine licence was more like the bsds, so when they got pissed off with people not contributing back they changed it.

        WineX is a fork of the old code.
      • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Interesting)

        by gaijin99 (143693) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:01AM (#9494394) Journal
        Since its the Lesser GPL, they have a bit more leeway. Under section 2 of the LGPL they must distribute all modifications to the LGPLed libraries under the LGPL, but they are allowed to simply use the LGPLed libraries alongside closed source work. Additionally, until March 2002 WINE was distributed under the MIT license [1], so as long as they never used any post March 2002 WINE code they'd be perfectly free to modify and not release their changes.

        Brad

        [1] Side note to the snarky BSD poster: which is basically the same as the 3-clause BSD license. So much for the inate superiority of the BSD license, huh? Not that I don't like the BSD license, but claiming that its a panacea is just so much nonesense. I think the world needs both licenses, personally.
      • Re:Too bad (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Turmio (29215) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @10:05AM (#9494426) Homepage
        Wine hasn't been under the LGPL from the beginning (which dates far far back to the 90's). WineX is derived from Wine from the era it was still licensed under the X11 license that allows this. The main Wine tree was re-licensed under LGPL partly due to TransGaming's actions (they promised to contribute all their changes back to the main Wine tree but they didn't) and some of the Wine developers wanted to prevent similar from happening from in the future and thus they changed the license to LGPL under which, as you stated, that couldn't happen. Not all developers agreed that Wine should be under LGPL so another fork, ReWind [sourceforge.net] was made that continues to use the X11 license. Interesting is that the LGPL'ed main tree can pull patches from ReWind but not vice-versa. Most contributors to Wine however dual-license their patches so that both trees can benefit from the efforts (and also WineX since TransGaming can use source from the ReWind tree if they want to).
    • Re:Too bad (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Ender Ryan (79406)
      Yeah, many people agree with you about Transgaming, and I understand and mostly agree. However, the original Wine license allowed them to do this, so there's really no point in complaining.

      Transgaming has chosen a business-model that requires them to keep their source closed. I'm not sure they have a viable alternative for running a for-profit business.

      So, I think the answer is absolutely no, they will never work with the open source community. They will continue to sell useful software to those will



  • Cedega (Se-day-gah) - [noun] - a unique variety of grape used to make some of the finest Port Wines in the world;

  • I got here with only 4 postings and transgaming was already /.ed... good work team!
    • I managed to see the newsletter and check it out before Slashdot posted it...phew!

      Of course, they are probably not down...most likely too many people clicked at once cloging their pipe.
      They should be fine by now or soon
      If I offered $50 to whoever asks, I sure as hell know that I'd physically get Slashdotted in seconds!
  • by ktulu1115 (567549) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:40AM (#9493729)
    I was curious as to what was going on at Transgaming - they had a large banner on their site yesterday with today's date on it and "Where will you be?". Had a funny feeling something was brewing. :)
  • by neilmoore67 (682829) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:41AM (#9493732)

    Will we see a new era of game compatibilty?

    Yes, as soon as games are compatible with platforms other than Windows, not before.

  • Impressive, but... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by 91degrees (207121) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:41AM (#9493734) Journal
    How seamless is it?

    My main problem with games in X is that I have to change the screen resolution myself. Most applications I'm quite happy with seeing in a window, but games I want full screen, often at a much lower resolution. I also want cutscenes to be displayed fullscreen.

    Does this solve that problem?
  • Shared Wineserver (Score:3, Interesting)

    by meridian (16189) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:42AM (#9493745) Homepage
    When are we going to see a shared memory wineserver. This would be the best way to see a significant speed increase in Wine, rather than it having to launch a new Wineserver process for each application run. Transgaming were working on this some time ago but seem to have ditched the idea.
    • Re:Shared Wineserver (Score:5, Informative)

      by Papineau (527159) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:49AM (#9493794) Homepage

      Currently, there's only one wineserver process launched to serve all Wine threads for a given user. What happens though, is that there are at least two context switches for each request to the wineserver. A shared memory wineserver architecture allow a Wine thread to access some data without any context switch, by only reading part of the shared memory of the wineserver. Thus the speed increase.

      At the last Wineconf in January, Gavriel State (of Transgaming) showed a short demo of American McGee's Alice with a partial shared memory wineserver, and the increase in the fps was about two fold (yes, double of what it was with the current design).

      • Re:Shared Wineserver (Score:5, Informative)

        by Joel Carr (693662) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:06AM (#9493907)
        At the last Wineconf in January, Gavriel State (of Transgaming) showed a short demo of American McGee's Alice with a partial shared memory wineserver, and the increase in the fps was about two fold (yes, double of what it was with the current design).

        Just thought I'd mention that this game is one of the corner cases that is drastically affected by reducing the number of context switches. A shared memory wineserver would not automatically give this sort of performance boost to any game/application. Not that you were implying it would, but just so people know.

        ---
    • Well what you are saying is sort of wrong.

      Wine[X]/Cedega uses only one wineserver for a single user (under normal situations) no matter how many wine programs are running. That has always been the case.

      What TransGaming have been working on is a shared memory wineserver, so there isn't so much overhead with context switching and stuff like that.

      Anyhow, it has been done, and is now available/active in Cedega 4.0

      From the release notes:
      * The previously slow path for client to server communication
      has
  • by illuminata (668963) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:43AM (#9493752) Journal
    The only way that we'll see a new era of Linux gaming is with direct support from all of the big boys. As long as Linux users have to jump through hoops to get their game running, as long as those games are less than 100% compatible, you won't see much changing.

    People want their games to work, not to pay for something (or deal with cvs) to get their stuff to partially work. Most people with a computer good enough to play DX9 games have a Windows disc anyways and a hd big enough to keep both. Transgaming will never be anything more than a niche company servicing a very small niche.
    • Not necessarily... (Score:3, Interesting)

      by StressGuy (472374)
      Right now, I'm looking at building a new computer and taking my existing one and making it into a computer for the kids. My children are very young so I'm kinda waiting for KDE to do some more work on this "Kiosk" mode. It would be great if Transgaming's software would support thier windows games "Finding Nemo", "Freddy the Fish", "Blues Clues", "Hot Wheels", etc. My son also likes TuxKart, TuxRacer, Frozen Bubble, Tux Pinball, and Pingus. He's kinda into penguins nowadays....I'm sure that's just a coin
    • Does "cedega" sound like a Final Fantasy spell to anyone else? Stronger than Cede and Ceda...

      But anyway, I used to think things like WINE would hinder "true" GNU/Linux game development, and while that may be true, the games are going to be proprietary anyway, so really what's the difference between running a locked-up native binary and a locked-up WINE-translated one? And in the case of WineX, even the program doing the emulation/translation is non-Free. Folks who don't care that PC games aren't open-so
  • by StressGuy (472374) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:43AM (#9493756)
    X-gamings site seems to be more fluff than substance. Having a hard time determining what games they support. I've got a couple of little ones and, if I can get games like "Freddy the Fish", "Reader Rabbit", "Blues Clues", that would make it worth looking into for me.

    However, I'm also looking at Crossover Office (or the SuSe "Wine Rack") for office compatability. Can I install both this and Transgaming's software or will they stomp on each other?

    Thanks,

    • You can install both. Infact, you can install and run multiple revisions of the WineHQ Wine at the same time.

      ---
    • by adam.skinner (721432) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:58AM (#9493857) Journal
      I set up MDK10 w/ cvswinex for my daughter's computer. She was able to run Pajama Sam, but not a couple of her other games. So it's pretty much a crap shoot when seeing if a game is going to work with winex or not. However, that's not to say that we haven't seen significant improvements with Winex 4.

      Btw, if you want to get cvswinex up and running, follow the instructions at linuX-gamers.net [linux-gamers.net]

    • by ecliptik (160746) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:11AM (#9493943) Homepage
      I run (and pay) for both of these, and they do work well together. Transgaming wine's binary is 'winex3', soon to be winex4 more than likey, and Codeweavers Crossover's binary is just plain 'wine'.

      I am using Debian unstable, and installed winex with their provided .deb and Crossover with ther install sh/rpm package.

      Both wonderful projects and make my GNU/Linux use almost seamless with windows progs.
    • I have Wine, WineX (3 different versions), CrossOver Office and CrossOver Plugin
      They were smart enough to give each directory their own path and commands in /usr/bin/ so nothing stomps on each other at all
  • by MarsDude (74832) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:44AM (#9493763) Homepage
    "Windows ® games to seamlessly and transparently run under Linux, out-of-the-box, with outstanding performance and equivalent game-play"
    They forgot to mention that small detail about all the bleeding-edge hardware you need to run the latest games.... THAT will give you the biggest part of the oustanding performance....
    • This is not at all true for most games unless the game requires the same under Windows.

      I have played a number of games that actually had improved framerates under WineX 3. It seems all that Windows backend stuff puts a higher tax on the system than most people realize, since the dev team for Windows focuses on making things feel responsive at the cost of overall performance. When it comes time to do purely heavy computations (such as in games), this approach costs CPU time that would otherwise have gone
  • Is it ok? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Apreche (239272) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:48AM (#9493784) Homepage Journal
    I'm still torn as to whether or not to pay for winex. I tried using the free/cvs version and it kind of worked. Of course, I didn't actually get any games to work correctly, not even simple ones, so it didn't work at all. First off, if I pay for winex and I get version 4.0 can I just never pay again and keep using 4 forever? I mean, as long as there aren't any games that come out for windows that I want (very very few lately) it shouldn't be a problem right? Also, is there a computer limit on winex? If I pay for version 4 once can I install it on 3 linux boxes without paying 3 times?

    All I really want to do is to play Steam and all of the mods and stuff that go along with it, in linux. If I can do it for a really low one time fee and never pay again, then I think this is a good deal.
    • Re:Is it ok? (Score:5, Informative)

      by mahdi13 (660205) <icarus.lnx@gmail.com> on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:19AM (#9494019) Journal
      Yes, it $15 for the first 3 months (minimum) and $5/month afterwards.

      You are free to cancel after those first 3 months anytime

      You are free to browse and download as often as needed during that time. I don't have a copy of the license available, but I believe it is a per-user license. But I'm not sure...I have it on two of my machines at least
  • by CrosseyedPainless (27978) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @08:51AM (#9493805) Homepage
    Based on my experiences with winex, not fcking likely. I suppose if you bought games you knew worked with winex, you'd be happy. Picking games you like, and trying to get them to work with winex is another problem altogether.

    Of course, I haven't tried this grape thing yet, but I have a month left on my Transgaming membership. Maybe I will be bitchslapped by reality, but I am low on optimism....
  • Well I suppose we can't complain.... much.
    I suppose the transgaming crowd put a lot of work into this.

    I have noticed though, that games are the one area where open source/FSF hasn't really made inroads. They're aren't a lot of high quaility games for linux and the emulators on it seem to be almost always inferior to the win32 application from whence they came?

    I suppose this is due to the high cost and workload associated with making a modern game. Makes you wonder though? How long until the cost and workl
    • Re:Too bad it's not (Score:4, Informative)

      by Chris_Jefferson (581445) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:09AM (#9493930) Homepage
      The problem with designing most styles of games is that they don't lend themselves to open source tactics.

      Having worked in a few betas, often a 90% finished game is still quite unplayable. Also for a good game you really need a group of people to decide what the goals are for the game and then reach these and release.

      Open source does lend itself to simpler more open ended games like nethack, but games more than anything really aren't much good until they are almost totally finished, and also most people won't play a game through more than a couple of times no matter how good it is
  • Got it (Score:5, Informative)

    by Dreadlord (671979) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:03AM (#9493889) Journal
    I was lucky enough to grab the new version before the /.'ing, TG says that this version adds support for some DirectX 9 features, like Pixel Shaders.

    I've tried a couple of new DirectX 9 games, and so far I'm quite happy with the results, first game is Far Cry, it used to work with the previous version, but now the performance is much better, with less artifacts and more effects.

    The other game is PainKiller, it runs quite well too, I had all kinds of problems trying to get this game running with the previous version.

    I know I'm going to be flamed for this post, but I wiped my Windows partition a while ago, and WineX (Cedega whatever) is doing a very good job giving me my gaming needs, it's still much better than having a Windows gaming partition.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:25AM (#9494066)
    [posted as AC to avoid karma whoring]

    Toronto/Ottawa -- June 22, 2004 -- TransGaming today unveils the milestone release of version 4.0 of its flagship product, WineX, which has been renamed to Cedega. Cedega allows Windows ® games to seamlessly and transparently run under Linux, out-of-the-box, with outstanding performance and equivalent game-play. Cedega 4.0 includes support for Microsoft ® DirectX ® 9.0, significantly broadening the scope and availability of the latest triple "A" titles for avid Linux gamers. The landmark release of Cedega 4.0 adds support for new blockbuster DirectX 9.0 titles such as EA's(TM) Battlefield Vietnam(TM), Eidos'(TM) Hitman: Contracts ©, and LucasArts' © Star Wars(TM)Galaxies(TM), bringing the total number of games supported under Cedega to well over 300. Furthermore, Cedega features unprecedented support for NCSoft's ® recently released massive multiplayer online game, City of Heroes ® and Blizzard Entertainment's ® unreleased but highly anticipated World of WarCraft ®.

    Cedega (Se-day-gah) - [noun] - a unique variety of grape used to make some of the finest Port Wines in the world; an innovative portability technology developed by TransGaming that allows Windows games to run on Linux.

    "Cedega 4.0 represents an amazing evolution of our Linux product. Thus, it was only fitting to give it a new name; a name that is representative of our product's maturity, complexity, sophistication, and elegance. The new name, Cedega, is meaningful and reflects the significant growth that both the product and TransGaming have enjoyed over the last few years," comments Vikas Gupta, Co-CEO and President of TransGaming Technologies.

    From a technical standpoint, this release sets a new benchmark for the support of games on Linux. "The Cedega 4.0 release contains more technological innovation than any previous TransGaming release and truly represents a milestone in game software portability. Cedega 4.0 supports titles that make use of the DirectX 9.0 API as well as advanced Pixel and Vertex shaders. Cedega 4.0 also includes a new advanced inter-process communication architecture that can double the speed of games which make heavy use of Win32 kernel synchronization primitives," remarks Gavriel State, CTO & Co-CEO of TransGaming Technologies.

    To keep pace with the growth of Linux worldwide and to more effectively meet consumer demands internationally, TransGaming is also pleased to announce the European launch of Cedega 4.0. European customers and subscribers can now pay in Euros, a feature that has been much anticipated and will cater specifically to the rapidly growing Linux community in European countries. Cedega 4.0 includes an updated version of its user friendly interface, Point2Play, with multiple language support for English, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese and German.

    About TransGaming Technologies Inc.

    TransGaming Technologies is a global leader in the development of software portability products that allow game developers and publishers to develop games for one system and deploy them across multiple platforms - faster, cheaper and better than anyone else.

    TransGaming's flagship Linux product, Cedega, supports hundreds of the hottest and most popular games on Linux, out-of-the-box, including hit titles such as Max Payne 2(TM), Battlefield 1942(TM), Battlefield Vietnam(TM), Medal of Honor(TM), Diablo II ®, EverQuest(TM), Star Wars Galaxies(TM), City of Heroes ® and many more. TransGaming has also ported such blockbuster titles as TRON 2.0 ®, James Bond 007(TM): Nightfire(TM), Law & Order(TM), Indiana Jones ® and The Emperor's Tomb(TM), just to name a few.

    TransGaming has a research and development center in Ottawa, Canada, with business, strategy, and operational activities conducted at the Toronto, Canada office. TransGaming was recently honored with inclusion on the Branham300 List of top IT companies in Canada for the second consecutive year. More information abou
  • It's Slashdotted (Score:4, Informative)

    by ciryon (218518) on Tuesday June 22, 2004 @09:56AM (#9494349) Journal
    Here's the info from the site:

    Toronto/Ottawa -- June 22, 2004 -- TransGaming today unveils the milestone release of version 4.0 of its flagship product, WineX, which has been renamed to Cedega. Cedega allows Windows ® games to seamlessly and transparently run under Linux, out-of-the-box, with outstanding performance and equivalent game-play. Cedega 4.0 includes support for Microsoft ® DirectX ® 9.0, significantly broadening the scope and availability of the latest triple "A" titles for avid Linux gamers. The landmark release of Cedega 4.0 adds support for new blockbuster DirectX 9.0 titles such as EA's(TM) Battlefield Vietnam(TM), Eidos'(TM) Hitman: Contracts ©, and LucasArts' © Star Wars(TM)Galaxies(TM), bringing the total number of games supported under Cedega to well over 300. Furthermore, Cedega features unprecedented support for NCSoft's ® recently released massive multiplayer online game, City of Heroes ® and Blizzard Entertainment's ® unreleased but highly anticipated World of WarCraft ®.

    Cedega (Se-day-gah) - [noun] - a unique variety of grape used to make some of the finest Port Wines in the world; an innovative portability technology developed by TransGaming that allows Windows games to run on Linux.

    "Cedega 4.0 represents an amazing evolution of our Linux product. Thus, it was only fitting to give it a new name; a name that is representative of our product's maturity, complexity, sophistication, and elegance. The new name, Cedega, is meaningful and reflects the significant growth that both the product and TransGaming have enjoyed over the last few years," comments Vikas Gupta, Co-CEO and President of TransGaming Technologies.

    From a technical standpoint, this release sets a new benchmark for the support of games on Linux. "The Cedega 4.0 release contains more technological innovation than any previous TransGaming release and truly represents a milestone in game software portability. Cedega 4.0 supports titles that make use of the DirectX 9.0 API as well as advanced Pixel and Vertex shaders. Cedega 4.0 also includes a new advanced inter-process communication architecture that can double the speed of games which make heavy use of Win32 kernel synchronization primitives," remarks Gavriel State, CTO & Co-CEO of TransGaming Technologies.

    To keep pace with the growth of Linux worldwide and to more effectively meet consumer demands internationally, TransGaming is also pleased to announce the European launch of Cedega 4.0. European customers and subscribers can now pay in Euros, a feature that has been much anticipated and will cater specifically to the rapidly growing Linux community in European countries. Cedega 4.0 includes an updated version of its user friendly interface, Point2Play, with multiple language support for English, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese and German.

    About TransGaming Technologies Inc.

    TransGaming Technologies is a global leader in the development of software portability products that allow game developers and publishers to develop games for one system and deploy them across multiple platforms - faster, cheaper and better than anyone else.

    TransGaming's flagship Linux product, Cedega, supports hundreds of the hottest and most popular games on Linux, out-of-the-box, including hit titles such as Max Payne 2(TM), Battlefield 1942(TM), Battlefield Vietnam(TM), Medal of Honor(TM), Diablo II ®, EverQuest(TM), Star Wars Galaxies(TM), City of Heroes ® and many more. TransGaming has also ported such blockbuster titles as TRON 2.0 ®, James Bond 007(TM): Nightfire(TM), Law & Order(TM), Indiana Jones ® and The Emperor's Tomb(TM), just to name a few.

    TransGaming has a research and development center in Ottawa, Canada, with business, strategy, and operational activities conducted at the Toronto, Canada office. TransGaming was recently honored with inclusion on the Branham300 List of top IT companies in Canada for the second consecutive year. More information about the c

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