Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Linux Software

Knoppix Tips and Tricks 496

Posted by michael
from the sweet-debian-goodness dept.
cosog writes "Robert Storey writes in a thorough review about Knoppix: 'Some people even take a Knoppix disk with them when they go shopping for a new computer, a clever way to ensure that the hardware will be Linux compatible before you purchase it.' His article discusses things like: booting, rescuing, installing on HDD, tips'n'tricks, etc... A nice read for everyone interested in Linux (and Knoppix in particular ;)."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Knoppix Tips and Tricks

Comments Filter:
  • Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by Cowclops (630818) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @09:52PM (#7877310)
    Knoppix + DD = ultimate way to mirror a drive from one to the other. Screw norton ghost.
  • BitTorrent link... (Score:5, Informative)

    by WIAKywbfatw (307557) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @09:56PM (#7877342) Journal
    Here's where to get it quickly, via the official BitTorrent: http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de:6969/ [uni-kl.de].

    The torrents are pretty fast; faster than the mirrors in my personal experience.
  • Re: Full text (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 04, 2004 @09:57PM (#7877359)
    In these modern times it seems that there is a product to suit every whim and fancy. Whether you need a miniature Statue of Liberty with a clock in her (its?) stomach or a stuffed alligator with a light bulb in its mouth, you can rest assured that somebody somewhere is marketing it.

    When it comes to software, much the same situation prevails. There are applications that do everything from psychoanalysis (in Emacs hit M-x and type "doctor"), to helping you contact alien civilizations (SETI@Home).

    Operating systems are not immune to this tendency towards specialization. Notepads, cell phones and perhaps your DVD player all have specialized operating systems. At the height of the dotcom bubble, there were pundits predicting that soon your online refrigerator would have an operating system, the purpose of which was allegedly to order milk when you needed it. Just why you couldn't buy your own damn milk was never explained to us.

    And finally we come to Linux distributions. There are different distros for different purposes. Desktop Linux (in many flavors), server Linux, embedded Linux, Linux routers, Linux BIOS, Linux on the Halfshell. And every so often, somebody comes up with a whole new use for Linux that just makes everybody sort of just stop in their tracks and say, "Cool!" Which brings me (you are still with me, aren't you?) to the topic of this article - Knoppix.

    Live From Germany

    Knoppix is a "live CD" distro - just boot it and use it. You do need a CD drive of course, but you don't need a hard disk. The implications of this are significant. It means you have a portable Linux that you can take with you wherever you go. This can be used in a number of innovative ways - as a demo disk, as a rescue disk, as a way to use Linux at your local Windows-only Internet cafe. Some people even take a Knoppix disk with them when they go shopping for a new computer, a clever way to ensure that the hardware will be Linux compatible before you purchase it.

    To be fair, Knoppix was not the first live CD ever created. Apple, for example, distributed MacOS (even before OSX) on a live CD. Linux has had DemoLinux, SUSE Live-Eval and Cool Linux, as well as some others. But none of these have come close to the functionality of Knoppix, which could justifiably claim the title as "first useful live CD." Even though Knoppix has inspired a number of clones (Gnoppix, Morphix, Freeduc, Quantian, to name a few), it still remains the most popular live CD distro by far.

    Most people are just awe-struck the first time they see a Knoppix CD boot. Probably the thing that blows them away is the hardware auto-detection. There is really nothing to configure - just boot the CD, and two to three minutes later you have a beautiful desktop system. This is remarkable, given the lack of standards (and lack of driver documentation) that exists in the PC world.

    Knoppix took the Linux world by storm in late 2002, but actually it's history is a little bit longer than that. Klaus Knopper of Germany started his experiment with "Knopper's *nix" about three years ago. As he tells the story, it wasn't his original intention to create a new Linux distro, but rather to learn how "el torito" (the booting mechanism on CDs) works, and how to get access to a whole CD from a minimal ramdisk system. However, his project soon attracted the attention of the LinuxTag association, which happily provided a mailing list and forum so that others could give their input. Though Klaus was (and still is) the solo developer of Knoppix, user feedback and bug-testing have helped make this distro the great success it is.

    Deep Impact

    Knoppix is one of the most up-to-date distros around. This is thanks to the fact that it is based on Sid, the "unstable" branch of Debian. Some people might be put off by the word "unstable," or the word "Sid" (the name of the mentally unstable kid in the movie "Toy Story"). Fortunately, in everyday use Knoppix is considerably more stable than many other distros (and infinitely more stabl
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by Dark Lord Seth (584963) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @09:58PM (#7877366) Journal

    Really? DD is far slower because it makes exact copies down to the bits. Norton Ghost works by cloning files instead. Instead, think of dump + gzip instead of dd. Insert some netcat for networking and presto, one central server holding default installs for all OSes you want. Probably works nice with network booting, then selecting a configuration, start cloning and then reboot into a brand-spanking new & fresh OS installation.

  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by KrispyKringle (672903) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:01PM (#7877392)
    Norton ghost does so much more than this. Hate to say it, but I've spent plenty of time looking for Ghost replacements, and found none. There are a few (g4u, for example) which do networked dd-style copying, or partimage, which can actually read a partition table but can't deal with NTFS, but none that have the capabilities Ghost has for copying Windows NT/2K/XP installations (I use Ghost in deploying donated computers to schools and community centers; we don't feel Linux is managable for the target users).

    See, if you do DD, it works if all the hard drives are the same size. But if you want to make an image that will last a while, on multiple machines, you have to make it match the smallest drive (since dd simply copies the content and doesn't rewrite the partition table). So if you make it, say, 2GB, you throw away a lot of space on bigger drives. And like I said, partimage can't write NTFS properly.

    Not to mention Ghostwalker, which changes the machine's hostname and rewrites the SID's (I think that's what they're called; I rarely use Windows anymore) on the files so that they are unique and secure.

  • Slashdotted? (Score:0, Informative)

    by Aenb (737881) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:01PM (#7877393)
    Original server is getting slow, see http://24.174.81.26/review.php [24.174.81.26]
  • by nurb432 (527695) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:04PM (#7877416) Homepage Journal
    Its by far a much better setup then plain knoppix. Well thought out and 'professional'.

    Not to knock knoppix as Klaus has given birth to the *practical* live CD movement, but its still has the 'feel' of a toy..

    Hmmmmm or have some fun and boot one off cluster knoppix and PXE the rest of the building...
  • best (Score:0, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:07PM (#7877434)
    best tip/trick w/knoppix disk:
    mount -o dev /dev/hdaX
    chroot /dev/hdaX
    lilo -v

    used it many times, had to re-install lilo after windows got corrupt, forgot to run lilo, AFTER editing lilo.conf. A real life saver. Afterall, who REALLY makes linux rescue disks anymore?:)
  • Article Text (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:09PM (#7877461)
    Something For Everyone
    "Everything that can be invented has been invented."
    -- Charles Duell, Commissioner of US Patent Office, 1899

    In these modern times it seems that there is a product to suit every whim and fancy. Whether you need a miniature Statue of Liberty with a clock in her (its?) stomach or a stuffed alligator with a light bulb in its mouth, you can rest assured that somebody somewhere is marketing it.

    When it comes to software, much the same situation prevails. There are applications that do everything from psychoanalysis (in Emacs hit M-x and type "doctor"), to helping you contact alien civilizations (SETI@Home).

    Operating systems are not immune to this tendency towards specialization. Notepads, cell phones and perhaps your DVD player all have specialized operating systems. At the height of the dotcom bubble, there were pundits predicting that soon your online refrigerator would have an operating system, the purpose of which was allegedly to order milk when you needed it. Just why you couldn't buy your own damn milk was never explained to us.

    And finally we come to Linux distributions. There are different distros for different purposes. Desktop Linux (in many flavors), server Linux, embedded Linux, Linux routers, Linux BIOS, Linux on the Halfshell. And every so often, somebody comes up with a whole new use for Linux that just makes everybody sort of just stop in their tracks and say, "Cool!" Which brings me (you are still with me, aren't you?) to the topic of this article - Knoppix.

    Live From Germany
    Knoppix is a "live CD" distro - just boot it and use it. You do need a CD drive of course, but you don't need a hard disk. The implications of this are significant. It means you have a portable Linux that you can take with you wherever you go. This can be used in a number of innovative ways - as a demo disk, as a rescue disk, as a way to use Linux at your local Windows-only Internet cafe. Some people even take a Knoppix disk with them when they go shopping for a new computer, a clever way to ensure that the hardware will be Linux compatible before you purchase it.

    To be fair, Knoppix was not the first live CD ever created. Apple, for example, distributed MacOS (even before OSX) on a live CD. Linux has had DemoLinux, SUSE Live-Eval and Cool Linux, as well as some others. But none of these have come close to the functionality of Knoppix, which could justifiably claim the title as "first useful live CD." Even though Knoppix has inspired a number of clones (Gnoppix, Morphix, Freeduc, Quantian, to name a few), it still remains the most popular live CD distro by far.

    Most people are just awe-struck the first time they see a Knoppix CD boot. Probably the thing that blows them away is the hardware auto-detection. There is really nothing to configure - just boot the CD, and two to three minutes later you have a beautiful desktop system. This is remarkable, given the lack of standards (and lack of driver documentation) that exists in the PC world.

    Knoppix took the Linux world by storm in late 2002, but actually it's history is a little bit longer than that. Klaus Knopper of Germany started his experiment with "Knopper's *nix" about three years ago. As he tells the story, it wasn't his original intention to create a new Linux distro, but rather to learn how "el torito" (the booting mechanism on CDs) works, and how to get access to a whole CD from a minimal ramdisk system. However, his project soon attracted the attention of the LinuxTag association, which happily provided a mailing list and forum so that others could give their input. Though Klaus was (and still is) the solo developer of Knoppix, user feedback and bug-testing have helped make this distro the great success it is.

    Deep Impact
    Knoppix is one of the most up-to-date distros around. This is thanks to the fact that it is based on Sid, the "unstable" branch of Debian. Some people might be put off by the word "unstable," or the word "Sid" (the name of the mentally unstable kid in
  • Re:DD != Ghost (Score:5, Informative)

    by shaitand (626655) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:11PM (#7877469) Journal
    True enough, DD != Ghost, but not what he claimed, he claimed that linux on a cd will supplant ghost and that is something different altogether.

    Now your not talking about ghost, your talking about a number of tools.

    mount
    partd
    mkfs
    kernel support for more filesystems than ghost will ever dream of.
    tar
    dd
    cp
    mkswap
    lilo/grub

    Between these utilities you can do pretty much everything ghost can and much much more. A knoppix cd (generally I use a customized one to take out the gui fluff) gives FAR more flexibility than any other software tool.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by BrookHarty (9119) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:18PM (#7877522) Homepage Journal
    Ghost supports EXT2 and EXT3, and if you use sector copy, you can use ReiserFS/UFS/HFS/etc.

    Personally, I use Barts Boot cdrom [nu2.nu], and ghost over tcp/ip to backup servers/workstations and laptops. I find ghost works great to backup a system that doesnt have an OS or a Partition over the network. Plus I can read .gho files with ghost explorer, incase I need a file off a backup.

    If ghost worked under winex or dosemu, then I'd run it under knoppix, but for now, Barts Cdrom does the job.

  • Re:Knoppix (Score:3, Informative)

    by fgb055639 (707256) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:24PM (#7877556) Homepage
    have you ever tried Mondo? www.mondorescue.org Handles all your needs...
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:27PM (#7877573)
    Ghost does several other things, and is a bit more space-efficient. Ghost parses filesystem structures and can restore to drives of different sizes.
    That said, there does exist a good free ghost-like tool or two for linux, which actually parse common linux filesystems:partimage [partimage.org] even has experimental NTFS support!
  • Knoppix and students (Score:5, Informative)

    by mokeyboy (585139) <mark.keir@gmail.com> on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:29PM (#7877577)
    Knoppix is a great distro to pass on to students who need to work in a *IX shell environment to do course work. I recommend it to EE and IT students when they want to get their feet wet but don't want to use VMWARE or go through a potentially destructive HDD repartition. The KDE interface is friendly to the Windows crippled, the harware detection is fantastic and running from the CD, a user can't break it. Many of the derivative distros are also great in niche areas (eg ClusterKNOPPIX). A great piece of work to help make Linux better appreciated and understood.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:4, Informative)

    by corian (34925) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:29PM (#7877584)
    Happily, there is also free software to do the same thing.

    ...which I might have correctly linked to, had I previewed my post.

    New SID [sysinternals.com]

  • by Stevyn (691306) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:30PM (#7877585)
    My best experience with linux is when I used knoppix a few months ago. My hard drive on my dell laptop crapped out again but I could still use my computer while the replacement was being shipped. I mean it wasn't perfect and I wouldn't want to use it full time, but it was a definate lifesaver that weekend.

    I like the idea of a live cd where if I fucked anything up, a simple reboot would fix everything. This is how linux should be taught to new users who are afraid of trying new things but still have some strange desire to use linux.
  • by Suppafly (179830) <.slashdot. .at. .suppafly.net.> on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:32PM (#7877600)
    52x Max (above might have been using a slow model) Hard Drive : Usually around 7200x

    These aren't comparable measurements at all.. The x in cdrom speeds is how many times faster it is than the original "1x" cdroms, and harddrive speed isn't measured in X's at all its in revolution's. You can't just add an X to the end of a harddrive speed and expect to compare it to a cdrom drive.
  • Article mirrors (Score:2, Informative)

    by ladislavb (551945) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:43PM (#7877665) Homepage
    If you find it hard to access the main site, please use one of these mirrors:
  • Mini Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by Cyno01 (573917) <Cyno01@hotmail.com> on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:47PM (#7877682) Homepage
    Try morphix [sourceforge.net], its knoppix without the kitchen sink, fits on most USB drives. I havn't used it pesonally, but i've heard good things.
  • Re:Need bootable USB (Score:5, Informative)

    by moosesocks (264553) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:48PM (#7877689) Homepage
    Easy solution to this:

    Boot off of knoppix CD, but place your home folder on your USB key. Knoppix readily supports this, and in most instances will automatically detect the key and the home folder without any special paramaters.

    An even bigger plus is that you probably won't need much more than a 32mb key for day-to-day use.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:3, Informative)

    by DJStealth (103231) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:53PM (#7877724)
    DD will copy the data in the unused space on the HD, not just the data within the files. (the advantage to this is that you can make exact copies, reguardless of what filesystem, partition type, etc.. the downside is that you cannot restore the image to a different sized partition later)

    Ghost will read file by file and write to the new disk. (advantages is that you can resize partitions, it'll be faster because it copies less data; disadvantage: it must support the file system; it may miss hidden/meta data you want copied)
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by Saint Stephen (19450) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:56PM (#7877744) Homepage Journal
    There's a solution called "Windows PE" (Windows Preexecution Environment), part of the "OEM Preinstallation Toolkit" specifically designed for the Dells and Compaqs of the world to preinstall the OS on the factory floor. I don't think it's publicly available. It is especially designed to boot from Readonly media, and it's supported.
  • by Daath (225404) <(lp) (at) (coder.dk)> on Sunday January 04, 2004 @10:57PM (#7877753) Homepage Journal
    FYI a 1X CD will revolve 210 times per minute at the outer edge, whereas it will revolve app. 539 times per minute on the inner edge.
    Hence a 52X speed CD-ROM will revolve 10920 and 28028 times per minute on the outer and inner edge respectively - What makes CD-ROMs slow is the spin-up and spin-down. Hence random access reads are extremely slow.
    Also a 52X is only 52 times faster than a 1X CD-ROM in theory and never on the entire disc. Most new CD-ROMs use CAV (constant angular velocity) and will revolve with the same speed on the entire disc, but will have different transfer rates depending on where on the disc you read.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by aking137 (266199) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:04PM (#7877794)
    Just FYI: I used Partimage on a 130-computer school network, where all machines were NTFS and ran either Windows NT or 2000, and it was always successful. so I recommend giving it a go. Kernel was my own compiled 2.4.18. 2.6.0 is stable write support too. Mail me if I can help.
  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:09PM (#7877820) Journal
    I read about it on CPU magazine. No its online otherwise I would link it.

    Anyway, the EU is about to vote on software patents and treaties with things like clicking on a file menu is owned by someone.

    Knoppix is European and can not afford the costs of software letigation. Just like to spread the word.

  • by ageitgey (216346) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:16PM (#7877864) Homepage
    He didn't say "at the same time". He should have said "210 times per minute when reading the outer edge and 539 times per minute when reading the inner edge". That would have been more clear.

    The drive spins the entire disk faster when it is reading the inner edge to maintain a constant read speed.

    But like the original poster said, this is no longer true in most modern "52x" drives that just read data more slowly along the inner edge of the disk as compared to the outer edge.
  • by tchuladdiass (174342) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:42PM (#7877992) Homepage
    I did the same thing. Told the sales guy to get his manager, and explained that I was going to buy a laptop that day, and the store that would get my business is the one that would let me verify the laptop with my boot cd. I also hinted that I liked their extended warranty options. Dollar signs lit up in the sales manager's eyes, he let me boot with Knoppix, and I left with a laptop, a grand less cash, and without the extended service plan :-)
  • by automatic_jack (181074) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:44PM (#7878005) Homepage
    I've been playing with Knoppix a bit recently and enjoying it, but it has pissed me off with two systems.

    One has a Biostar motherboard with a Via Rhine network card on it. For some reason, though Knoppix will load the Via Rhine module for it, the card won't come up. It works fine in Debian with the same module, and I've seen posts that the module is somehow compiled slightly wrong in Knoppix. But to fix it, I need to install the Knoppix kernel to a hard drive and then recompile the module! No thanks...

    The other is my laptop which has a Senao pcmcia wifi card. Again, in Debian with wlan-ng I can make the card work fine using the prism_cs driver, but Knoppix seems to really, really want to use the orinoco driver for the card. So much that, no matter WHAT I do, I can't get it to use the prism_cs driver. Highly irritating!

    Oh well.
  • by damiam (409504) on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:50PM (#7878039)
    No more hassles of "I got this great movie I want to show you, do you have the SPANKME Codec?" -- just burn a Knoppix CD set up to play the movie on boot.

    Already been done [sourceforge.net]. Also, Morphix [sourceforge.net] can fufill most of your other requests, although it's not point-and-click customizable quite yet.

  • Re:Knoppix (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 04, 2004 @11:52PM (#7878052)
    DD is far slower because it makes exact copies down to the bits.

    If you specify a larger block size dd goes much faster:

    $dd bs=1024 if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdc

    I heard you should try to have the two hard drives on separate IDE channels for best performance.
  • Re:DD != Ghost (Score:4, Informative)

    by Avihson (689950) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:10AM (#7878141)
    I have it on a mini CDRW. All the utils mentioned plus a minimum Xserver to run qt_parted.
    Check out System Rescue CD [sysresccd.org] They even have a PPC version.

    I compare the price and license of the rescue CD to that of Ghost. I can give the CD away to anyone without a worry, I can't do that with Ghost.
  • System Rescue CD (Score:3, Informative)

    by Avihson (689950) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:15AM (#7878172)
    You have to load the 72mb of OS into ram. That should be no problem with the system requirements of any post Windows 98 OS. Check my above post for the link to the System Rescue CD. Saved my bacon a few times in the last couple of months.

    A happy user of QTParted
  • Re:Being put off (Score:2, Informative)

    by certron (57841) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:17AM (#7878180)
    Well, suppose you are one of those people. Can I tell you that Sid can also be expanded as "still in development" or "Sid is dangerous"? You can be put off as much as you want, it does not change the product itself.

    If you want to not use debian, that is fine. I think someone in the debian team used to work at Pixar, so they are making their releases named after Toy Story characters for a while (bo, rex, hamm, woody, sarge, others).
  • by po8 (187055) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:30AM (#7878284)

    Whether BT is faster for grabbing KNOPPIX depends on where you are. My office box is on the INET2 backbone, and I've found that grabbing from an INET2 mirror via HTTP or FTP is about 100x faster there than grabbing via BT. YMMV.

  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by great throwdini (118430) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:37AM (#7878340)

    Hmmm... what to think of a post scored as +3 Funny that simply summarizes a bit by the Dead Alewives [deadalewives.com] without giving credit where credit is due [reference.com]?

    Funny. Sad. Whatever. Listen to the original routine should you be so inclined.

  • by CedgeS (159076) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:41AM (#7878360) Homepage Journal
    Knoppix is excellent for data rescue and recovery work. This data recovery howto [shockfamily.net] for Knoppix has proved invaluable for many of my friends. It has also been translated into Polish [7thguard.net]
  • Knoppix firewall (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:54AM (#7878440)
    Knoppix is very cool, but even though it only offers two services in default mode(x11 and bootpd)I would feel naked without a firewall. The default iptables policies are all ACCEPT. You can easiely fix this by adding just two rules. The simpliest rules you could add are "iptables -P INPUT DROP" then "iptables -A INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT" . Now you have statefull firewall that lets you establish any kind of outgoing connection you wish and the returning packets are let back through the firewall.
  • Re:Rescue (Score:2, Informative)

    by binarytoaster (174681) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:54AM (#7878441)
    It's gotten me out of rm -rf, too - reiserfsck --rebuild-tree --search-empty (or something like that) will recover accidentally deleted files on ReiserFS. :)
  • colleges do this (Score:3, Informative)

    by iamhassi (659463) on Monday January 05, 2004 @01:18AM (#7878564) Journal
    " Probably works nice with network booting, then selecting a configuration, start cloning and then reboot into a brand-spanking new & fresh OS installation."

    Campus computers were setup like that. The drives were wiped when restarted, and on boot it'd load a cloned OS over the network onto the hard drive.

    Kept the geeks from installing viruses and required no maintance, since the OS for every PC on campus was all on one server, just had to be sure every PC was similar so the drivers could be the same.

  • Re:Need bootable USB (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 05, 2004 @01:41AM (#7878660)
    It's an easy way to avoid paying rental fees for computer usage.

    I work at a net-cafe and we had add BIOS passwords and remove CD and floppy booting from the startup routine to keep people from coming in with thier own bootable media.

    The last straw that caused that was when I caught some kids with a Knoppix CD poking around the system, luckily we use ntfs so they werent able to install cain or any other password sniffers.
  • by Clockwurk (577966) on Monday January 05, 2004 @01:48AM (#7878695) Homepage
    and had some mixed success. The install was pretty painless (other than figuring out the formatting utility) and the OS itself isn't bad.

    I ran into a couple of problems though. Sndconfig refuses to work with my sound card. I have an audigy and the emu10k1 (or whatever the hell name it was) installs by default. Running the sndconfig command (after struggling to find a way to close x windows without shutting down) I was greeted by a "module is not in the specified search path"... No information was given as to which path was the search path nor any information as to how to change the search path.

    Knoppix also installs by default close to every program ever written for linux including both KOffice and OO.o perhaps a little bit of an overkill.

    The other problem I have with knoppix is changing the refresh rate and screen resolution. When using the live CD, the refresh rate and the screen resolution are some of the "cheat codes" you can enter. In the hard-disk install, no oppurtunity is offered for the entering of such codes. I'll probably end up having to edit some .conf file :'-(

    The final minor annoyance (and it is minor) is that the CD version boots using both color and a nice resolution (1024x768) for the streams of console text that appear during booting. The hard-disk install does not. It's pretty minor, but the colored text and resolution was really nice and made reading the text much easier.

    Knoppix is a really good live CD, but the harddrive install leaves a little to be desired. Hopefully that changes with new versions.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:5, Informative)

    by redback (15527) on Monday January 05, 2004 @02:01AM (#7878741)
    Ghostwalker is not nessacaray, there is a microsoft tool called SysPrep that does this for you.

    You run it on a machine to reset the name and SID's, then on next boot it asks you for a machine name and recreates the SID's.

    So sysprep, ghost, startup and put in name and your done.
  • by freeweed (309734) on Monday January 05, 2004 @02:17AM (#7878816)
    Click the Knoppix CD icon on the task bar. There's an option to save Knoppix settings, tell it to save to your USB key. During this process, it tells you just what you need to do to load those settings. You have to type in a command at the boot: prompt (the next time you boot, natch), something like "knoppix home=/dev/sda1". Done. It loads from there.

    I've just started playing with Knoppix tonight, and I gotta tell you, I'm sold. THIS is what Linux should be.
  • by redune45 (194113) <slashdot.redune@com> on Monday January 05, 2004 @02:57AM (#7878977) Homepage
    Sadly Broadcom 802.11g cards are not supported officially in linux.

    However, check out Linuxant's Driverloader [linuxant.com] It loads the Windows driver and allows it to drive the wifi card in linux.

    In fact I'm using it right now - great stuff. Although I don't know how you would be able to integrate it into a Knoppix CD
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 05, 2004 @03:03AM (#7878993)
    Stop the taxs, Gates TAX is evil..

    They give insentives to OEM builders that meet certain goals to give loawer OS $prices for the more systems they sell with there product. This is great and i am sure with in there right. but makes it harder to push alternative OS for a big company. say I am not as big as DELL or HP and I have a computer store that sells a small amount of systems. If I give into there sell more and get it less Am I not breaking there legal contract if I load linux on some systems I sell.

    DELL don't they get a discount deal as long as they sign something that says that they can not sell without a XP OS.. how do i avoid paying the MS TAX?!
  • by AlXtreme (223728) on Monday January 05, 2004 @04:35AM (#7879322) Homepage Journal
    Not yet, we've been working on this, however having good scripts to autobuild knoppix-based modules and livecds has a higher priority (the fancy UI's will come afterwards, there already is a prototype though). There's quite a large community and a large number of projects working on livecds, we're trying to make our lives as easy as possible.

    Having said that, Knoppix (still) rocks :-)

  • dd and speed (Score:2, Informative)

    by TA (14109) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:27PM (#7881538)
    'dd' is slow only when you don't specify a blocksize. The default is just 2048 bytes, which makes it really slow. Just specify a larger blocksize, e.g. dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb bs=131072
    If you want to make an exact copy of a disk full of data then there is no faster way than this.
  • Re:Knoppix (Score:2, Informative)

    by gertsenl (719370) on Monday January 05, 2004 @12:41PM (#7881656)
    It's actually Mordenkainen's. It's a 5th level Conjuration/Summoning, according to the 1st edition AD&D player's handbook, and I really ought to be shot for looking it up and posting.
  • by Duchamp (8770) on Monday January 05, 2004 @01:50PM (#7882365) Homepage Journal
    I'm building a Myth based PVR using KnoppMyth. http://mysettopbox.tv/knoppmyth.html [mysettopbox.tv]

    It's quite amazing how easy it is to get running.

    Before you try it, I recommend you cruise the discussion forum to be sure your hardware is supported.

  • by jubei (89485) on Monday January 05, 2004 @03:26PM (#7883287)
    1x cd-roms transfer 150 kilo BYTES a second, not bits.

    Remember that a typical mp3 (which is compressed) is 128-196 kilobits a second.
  • by shaitand (626655) on Monday January 05, 2004 @10:21PM (#7887178) Journal
    Just to debunk (not by any means denying that's the official microsoft voice on the issue), as usual that is mostly microsoft trying to scare people away.

    Mainly this, Sysprep works perfectly well on OEM versions AND upgrades.

    Basically all sysprep REALLY does is, change the pc name and SID + knock out motherboard and ide drivers.

    It's kind of like performing the first half of a win98 install, then ghosting that to different systems, you will get clean hardware detection every time and simply cut the install time down (since copying everything with ghost or knoppix at that point takes about 2 min where the installer takes 20).

    Activation issues are not an issue.

    So most of those things work (especially the big ones), just don't expect microsoft to help you with them. Have you ever called microsoft anyway? and if so, did ever make the same mistake (of calling) again?

Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves. -- Lazarus Long

Working...