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I prefer my peppers ...

Displaying poll results.
... completely sweet (0 Scoville Heat Units)
  899 votes / 4%
... only very mild (under 1000 SHU)
  1890 votes / 10%
... fairly spicy (1000-5000 SHU)
  4892 votes / 26%
... very spicy (5001-30,000 SHU)
  3997 votes / 21%
... extremely spicy (30,001-100,000 SHU)
  2016 votes / 11%
... ludicrously spicy (over 100,000 SHU)
  1338 votes / 7%
Nothing milder than Bhut Jolokia, please.
  1087 votes / 5%
... to be on someone else's plate.
  2162 votes / 11%
18281 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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I prefer my peppers ...

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  • Common Examples (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nightwraith (180411) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:03AM (#46573993)

    Boy, I might have included examples (Jalapeno, Habanero) of said peppers in the Poll instead of only one at the very end of the scale.

    • Re:Common Examples (Score:5, Informative)

      by Chrisq (894406) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:52AM (#46574507)

      Boy, I might have included examples (Jalapeno, Habanero) of said peppers in the Poll instead of only one at the very end of the scale.

      But this is for geeks! Here is a useful table [wikipedia.org] for you

      • by Tiger4 (840741)

        Thanks for that link! Habanero is about my limit, but I had no idea where it fell on the scale. For me Tabasco is just mid-range warm.

        • Re:Common Examples (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Drishmung (458368) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @10:28PM (#46580693)
          Peri-peri is about my limit, though Habanero stuffed with cream cheese is tolerable (and delicious).I also really like the taste of peri-peri, which is quite different from the somewhat smokey taste of Habanero.

          That seems to put me at the ludicrously spicy level, yet that is only 'hot' according to the local shop.

          It also depends on the cook. I'm not just into endorphin rush, I like food to taste rather than inflict. I've had 'medium' curry that was literally painful and not much else; the hottest curry I ever had was so perfectly balanced it didn't taste particularly hot at all---and then I swear my eyeballs were melting! I kept eating the delicious meal through the streaming tears and then enjoyed the buzz afterwards. And no ring of fire either.

          • by marsu_k (701360)
            I really recommend you give Bhut Jolokia a try. Yes, it is very, very, very hot, but obviously you don't use that much of it on a meal. Personally I prefer it to Habaneros - they have a bitter taste to them IMHO, while Bhut is really quite sweet and fruity, once you get past the heat. However it's advisable to use gloves when handling it (picking your nose or rubbing your eyes can be an experience afterwards). Also to get rid of the initial "shock", try frying it in oil for a while before adding anything el
        • Re:Common Examples (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Capsaicin (412918) * on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:44PM (#46581181)

          Thanks for that link! Habanero is about my limit, but I had no idea where it fell on the scale.

          T'was not too long ago the the Red Savina Habanero fell at the very top of the heat scale (scoring a 10+) or ca. 250,000 SU, with the other Habaneros just behind. [Correction: I note the abovementioned table has the Red Savina at 350K+ (in contradistinction to the caption)]. This was dwarfed when the ghost chillies (your Bhut Jolokia and friends) arrived on the scene and again when your Trinidad Scorpion vars. emerged. I suggest searching 'Trinidad Scorpion pod test' on youtube for some light family viewing. :)

      • by pspahn (1175617)

        I suppose it is at least useful as some kind of chart that describes what those peppers might be on a certain day. Anyone who has grown their own peppers knows that there are freaks that will defy any chart that exists. I've had jalapenos that were much hotter than habaneros and couldn't be differentiated from ghost pepppers (aside from flavor). The habaneros we had last year were milder than a typical Anaheim.

      • by JTsyo (1338447)
        after seeing the list I would like to change my answer from fairly to very please.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:03AM (#46573995)

    Nominating for hottest pepper: the Chocolate Bhutlah
    Nominating for the Darwin Award / funniest video (of guy eating said nominated hottest pepper): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvdjBtw-XbE

    • by butalearner (1235200) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @05:33PM (#46577987)
      How long until somebody gets their hands on straight capsaicin, then drinks it on camera? That person would automatically win forever.
      • Re:best pepper? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by klevin (11545) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @10:37PM (#46580779) Homepage Journal

        Or, somebody chowing down on some Resiniferatoxin [wikipedia.org].

      • by Drishmung (458368) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @10:39PM (#46580797)
        FOAF story:

        My friend was in a restaurant where a diner was complaining LOUDLY that the curry was not hot enough, and the chef didn't know how to cook.

        The chef emerged from the kitchen with a bottle of clear liquid and a spoon.

        "Your curry not hot enough sir? That's OK sir, we can make it a bit hotter if you like sir. I can put some extra heat in sir. Here sir, try this and see how much you think you need."

        Hands teaspoon of clear liquid to customer.

        Customer (egged on by drunken mates) sips liquid.

        Customer is carried out of restaurant by his friends—to the applause of the rest of the patrons!

        As the chef returns to the kitchen, my friend intercepts him and asks what is in the bottle.

        "Pure Capsaicin. We use it to make the curry as hot as we need to" says the chef with an evil grin.

        • by 6Yankee (597075) on Friday March 28, 2014 @05:04AM (#46600751)

          When I worked in McJail, we once had a promotional chilli burger. God only knows what was in that sauce, but if you breathed at the wrong moment while cleaning the gun you'd quickly find yourself curled up on the floor gasping for air. Each burger was meant to get one shot of the stuff. Some of the hardasses on shift claimed to have eaten one with four, but nobody could remember having seen any of them actually pull it off.

          Anyway. Customer comes up to the counter with a mostly-eaten burger - funny how the only ones worth complaining about were always mostly-eaten - and proclaims loudly and profanely that it's not hot enough. Demands a better one. Now.

          The customer is always shite, I mean right. Yes sir. Right away sir.

          Fourteen shots, we put in that thing. We had to build it in the box to stop everything from sliding off everything else, and fifteen just wouldn't fit. What a mess. We quickly squashed the lid shut, handed it over to Front before it exploded, and then rested our folded arms on the production bin to watch the show.

          His first mistake was licking up all the sauce that ran down to his elbows. Bad call. Before he'd even taken a bite his eyes were streaming and his large Sprite was gone. A quarter of the way in, he noticed us watching and grinning - as he rushed to the counter to buy another Sprite. We were still grinning as we gave him three more Sprites after that. To his credit, he finished the damn thing. He left without saying a word (largely because he couldn't), suitably chastened.

          Damn, I miss that job sometimes.

  • Depends on the dish (Score:5, Interesting)

    by I'm New Around Here (1154723) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:12AM (#46574069)

    I make scrambled eggs in the morning, with mushrooms, onions, and red bell peppers. I consider them to be sweet, but have no idea of where they are on that scale.

    When I eat chili, I like the chili powder on it.

    Sometimes I have jalapenos on a sandwich, but they usually give me hiccups for some reason.

    I avoid the hotter peppers, because they make my mouth burn and then I can't enjoy the flavor of the food. Why would I want to spend 20 minutes breathing quickly and chugging cold water, rather than enjoying the food I paid for? (But for people who enjoy hotter foods, more power to them.)

    Now, as for my wife, Taco Bell's Mild Sauce is too hot for her. I keep saying that to balance the Fire Sauce they now have, Taco Bell should release a Bland Sauce for her. It would basically be chopped tomatoes with a little onion.

    • by racermd (314140)

      I'll do you one better. My mother could never eat Heinz ketchup because, to her, it was too spicy. I think it might have been the garlic or onion flavors in it. We always had Hunts in the fridge.

      Until I finally moved out on my own (a few decades ago), I hadn't realized food was supposed to have so much actual flavor! My mom's cooking was clearly centered around her sensitivities. I wouldn't say my brother, father, and I suffered, per se, but I can appreciate a much wider variety of foods now that I kno

      • Yeah, that was my house too. No Heinz ketchup, no black pepper, no cinnamon flavored anything, no garlic, no peppers of any kind ( including sweet bell peppers). Taco meat was ground beef seasoned with ... nothing not even salt. Taco bell meat by itself was too spicy. KFC was too spicy. Ginger bread was made ... without ginger.

        Life is much more flavorful now, but the transition to "spicy foods" was kind of traumatic. Friends watched in delight as I reacted violently to the most mild of spices

        • by Lumpy (12016)

          your first experience with Indian Cuisine must have been hilarious to watch.

      • by jbengt (874751) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @02:29PM (#46576095)

        Until I finally moved out on my own (a few decades ago), I hadn't realized food was supposed to have so much actual flavor

        Those who routinely eat extremely spicy food also don't realize that food is supposed to have so much actual flavor.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by jellomizer (103300)

          Actually after you get use to the spiciness, then you are able to get the other flavors as well.
          I call the heat of a dish is the 6th form of taste
          Sweet
          Sour
          Salty
          Bitter
          Umani
          Heat

          To the people who are not use to it, it feels like their mouth is on fire, after you get use to it, and train your brain to say this is actually healthy food, it stops sending the panic and you no longer focus on the heat but all the other flavors in the food, the head just adds to the total taste.

        • by kramulous (977841)

          Not true, at all. Typical of sweeping generalisations.

          It is a spice. Like any other. When in combination with other spices and flavours, it can enhance. Example, a sweet dish with a dash of spice can completely change the flavour journey.

          You also learn to become tolerant to capsaicin. After a while, the burn no longer occurs and you enjoy the flavour it has, the taste sensation. Like building a tolerance to all the other spices.

        • by Nidi62 (1525137)

          Those who routinely eat extremely spicy food also don't realize that food is supposed to have so much actual flavor.

          There is a wing place near me that recently changed owners. I used to love their hot marinade-it was housemade, had great flavor, and you could see the chunks of peppers in it. When they changed, the hot had way too much black pepper in it (you could see the grains there were so many). I stepped up to their next-level hot marinade and found that it isn't much hotter (and in fact the burn doesn't last as long) and has much better flavor.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      to balance the Fire Sauce

      Balance heat with plain yoghurt, or a glass of full-cream milk if you have no yoghurt handy. Far more effective that water.

    • by NoImNotNineVolt (832851) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @12:20PM (#46574733) Homepage
      Protip: Never, ever drink water if you just ate something that was "too spicy". Capsaicin isn't water soluble, so you're just spreading it around with the water, making it burn even worse. Try whole milk or ice cream instead. Much, much better.

      Also, some people enjoy the delirium/euphoria that accompanies overwhelming hotness. It's one of the few altered states of consciousness that hasn't been outlawed yet.

      I once ate a 1cm thick slice of Bhut Jolokia, fresh from the garden. It was indeed painfully hot, just as I had expected. After 10-15 minutes of various fluids being expelled from my face (crying, runny nose, etc.), I was totally fine. The key to eating insanely spicy foods is to avoid getting them on your hands and lips. Your mouth will clean the sapsaicin away in short order, but your lips will be on fire for quite some time. And god forbid you go to rub your eyes after you just held some bhut jolokia in your hand...
      • Protip: Never, ever drink water if you just ate something that was "too spicy". Capsaicin isn't water soluble, so you're just spreading it around with the water, making it burn even worse. Try whole milk or ice cream instead. Much, much better. Also, some people enjoy the delirium/euphoria that accompanies overwhelming hotness. It's one of the few altered states of consciousness that hasn't been outlawed yet. I once ate a 1cm thick slice of Bhut Jolokia, fresh from the garden. It was indeed painfully hot, just as I had expected. After 10-15 minutes of various fluids being expelled from my face (crying, runny nose, etc.), I was totally fine. The key to eating insanely spicy foods is to avoid getting them on your hands and lips. Your mouth will clean the sapsaicin away in short order, but your lips will be on fire for quite some time. And god forbid you go to rub your eyes after you just held some bhut jolokia in your hand...

        Addon to protip: Any type of bread product works, especially in combination with milk, to quench the fire. I also like extraordinarily spicy food, but I don't want it to linger more than a few minutes.

        • Concur.

          Buffalo Wild Wings' Blazin' wings, "extra wet". Get them boneless to spare your lips. (Why is it that the boneless ones never have nearly as much sauce? Always ask for them extra wet!)

          I've spent most of my life in [ethnically diverse] New Jersey. I'm no stranger to Indian and Thai food. I'm somewhat of a chilihead for a white guy, but some of the brown folks I live among can eat stuff that nearly melts silverware.
          • by afidel (530433)

            That reminds me of my dads indian friend, he often left curry cooking all day while he was in class and teaching. One day we accompanied him home at the end of his school day, when he opened the door it was like being maced (and I too am a bit of a chilihead). Another friend told us when he moved out that the landlord had to strip the existing paint and put on 3 coats of thick paint just to get the smell down to where someone else could stand to be in the place long enough to sign a lease =)

        • by tigersha (151319) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @04:44PM (#46577493) Homepage

          Another protip. Don't switch you 2 year-old daughter's nappies an hour after cutting chillis either.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @01:47PM (#46575601)

        And god forbid you go to rub your eyes after you just held some bhut jolokia in your hand...

        PROTIP: If you have a significant other, do not chop habaneros by hand in the afternoon so that you and your significant other can have a nice bowl of chili on a cold winter's night before snuggling up and... well, it got awkward from there.

        • I made my own Bhut Jolokia hot sauce once. Didn't come out too great. But making it...

          So I chop up some peppers, throw them on a baking sheet, and put them in a warm oven for a few hours to dry. Well, while they're drying, my hands are seriously burning. I try washing them with anything and everything to no avail. They feel like they're engulfed in flames. Eventually, I start coughing. A lot. My eyes are watering. Watering a lot. It seems that the entire house is rapidly filling up with teargas. I struggl
      • Protip: Never, ever drink water if you just ate something that was "too spicy". Capsaicin isn't water soluble, so you're just spreading it around with the water, making it burn even worse. Try whole milk or ice cream instead. Much, much better.

        But I'm lactose intolerant you insensitive clod.
        I just avoid spicy food. :)

    • I also get hiccups from spicy food, which is annoying. It started a few years ago, never had a problem as a kid.

      My favorite peppers are serranos, but I cut out the seeds and membranes before I eat them. Delicious on pizza--I like the flavor more than jalapenos.

    • by PhilHibbs (4537)

      Same here. I love sweet peppers, which are pretty much zero on the scale if you remove the seeds, and I certainly use more of those than hot peppers, but I like jalapenos as well, and plenty of finely chopped scotch bonnets in a chilli.

    • I make scrambled eggs in the morning, with mushrooms, onions, and red bell peppers. I consider them to be sweet, but have no idea of where they are on that scale.

      Bell peppers are indeed 0 SHU. No heat at all.

  • Habaneros all the way. Spicy, but not painful; a nice lip-numbing burn. They also have a nice citrus-like flavor which makes anything you add them to that much more amazing. Four or five of those diced in a pot of chili is unbeatable.
    • by zlives (2009072)

      if you are doing 4-5 habaneros... you may be good for one ghost pepper. much deeper heat i really enjoy them.

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        not just the heat. the flavor is awesome as well. A fire roasted Ghost is insanely awesome.

        • Maybe it's just my experience, but the ghost peppers I've had have all had a chemical-like taste to them, even ones I've grown myself. And they seem to vary from not spicy at all to searing pain. I find habaneros to be very consistent in both spiciness and flavor.
          • by Lumpy (12016)

            how are you growing them yourself? everything I tasted that were US grown were nasty as hell because the soil here is useless for growing them. You need to get them imported to get real ones. Anything USA grown tastes like garbage. I have heard rumor you can buy a bag of proper soil for growing them, and that they take very well to hydroponic growing but you need the specific soil makup of India to get the flavors right.

            • by zlives (2009072)

              I just had it here in US (N Cali valley), some friends grow it and seem to have great flavor and heat consistently. Then again everything grows here and does well. I guess i could ask for details on how they grow them... but then they may get the wrong idea that i actually want to grow and not just consume :)

            • I had them in pots on my deck in Miracle Gro potting soil in full sun watering them almost daily. I also mixed some Osmocote into the soil. They grew well, and I had quite a few peppers per plant. Some were insanely hot (to the point where eating one didn't burn, it was just straight pain), and others hardly had any heat at all. But all of them had little to no actual flavor, or simply tasted like chemicals. My friend's dad grew some as well, the same way (not sure what soil he used or what, if any, fertili
            • by geekoid (135745)

              There is nothing magic about india's soil. There are plenty of places in the US that have all the needed parameters. High soil temp, excellent drainage, correct Ph level and proper pollination. Hell I could grow them in my garage here in Oregon.
              It's science.

              I wonder what honey taste like from a hive the pollinates ghost peppers.

          • by Carewolf (581105)

            That is my experience too, and I was growing ghost peppers myself. I would not recommend them for anything but homemade teargas (just pop one of them on a hot frying pan).

            Habaneroes all the way. They taste much better and if you only use the chili meat and not the seeds you get a slow delayed burning that doesn't burn in the mouth but just starts warming you nicely from the inside some 10 minutes later (also a great surprise for beginners - this is not that hot - 10 minutes later - oh god oh god, please kil

  • How about (Score:5, Insightful)

    by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland @ y a hoo.com> on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @11:47AM (#46574453) Homepage Journal

    ...to be tasty?

    Anyone who eats a pepper based just on how chemically hot it feels is an idiot, or in their twenties, but I repeat myself.

    • by Zocalo (252965)
      Not just tasty in their own right, but also not be so hot that you kill any chance of really enjoying the taste of whatever else that you are eating them with/in. I can manage peppers a fair way up the scale; a hot Piri Piri sauce doesn't bother me much, nor do habaneros, which are both around the 50-100K bracket IIRC, but all I can taste after a few mouthfuls is the pepper. I'd much rather have something like jalapeños or something even lower on the scale, so I can taste both the pepper and the rest
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Capsaicin does not overwhelm other flavors, but you may be preoccupied with your responses to it that you do not think about the rest of the food. A couple years ago I had cooked with Bhut Jolokias enough to recognize the flavor of the pepper in various dishes (I'm still not sure how my ghost-boosted salsa mix ended up being mild, but I prepared food all across the spiciness spectrum with those peppers). That was a few years ago, and I've been mostly working with serranos recently because my local grocery

        • by ockegheim (808089)
          AFAIK, capsaicin doesn’t actually have a flavour, or at least a significant one. It chemically induces pain receptors to feel pain, so if you’re tolerant, you can enjoy the flavours of the dish. As parent says, searing pain may distract you from flavours.

          Peppers can vary greatly in heat. I read recently some farmers talking about their peppers. They said that one pepper in ten would cause serious pain, and the others were significantly milder.
    • Anyone who eats a pepper based just on how chemically hot it feels is an idiot, or in their twenties, but I repeat myself.

      Or maybe they just enjoy the endorphin rush... [thehotpepper.com]

      • by 32771 (906153)

        Ha, ha, the Dorset Naga, this just makes my day. I always thought that Indian cuisine filled an enormous void in Britain, but this is just way out there.

        Alright, now would you be so kind to hand me the spicy peppermint sauce, hi, hi, hi, ...

    • by 32771 (906153)

      Actually my experiments with Scotch Bonnet (capsicum chinense) have never really allowed me to taste much beyond the hotness. Fortunately there are other spices around that are strong enough to get through the hotness. Thai curry contains a number of them usually.

      Also the hotness supposedly has an appetite suppressing effect:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pu... [nih.gov]

    • ...to be tasty?

      Anyone who eats a pepper based just on how chemically hot it feels is an idiot, or in their twenties, but I repeat myself.

      Totally agree. I like hot peppers, but I like the heat to supplement the flavor. Eating peppers as a weird proxy for machismo is just silly.

      • by ockegheim (808089)
        That said, when I was in my twenties I would sometimes go to an Indian restaurant that did up to vindaloo, then vindaloo +1, meaning extra chilli. One of the most fun nights I ever had was watching two friends make their way through a +1. The most I managed was +2. If you ate a +5 you got on to the honour-board, and the theoretical maximum was +13. Fun times.

        Apparently the local university rugby club would take their new recruits there for a machismo initiation. That would have been fun to watch.
    • Re:How about (Score:4, Insightful)

      by swillden (191260) <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Wednesday March 26, 2014 @01:00AM (#46581499) Homepage Journal

      ...to be tasty?

      Anyone who eats a pepper based just on how chemically hot it feels is an idiot, or in their twenties, but I repeat myself.

      Nonsense.

      I like the burn. Completely aside from the flavor of various hot peppers (which I also really like), I really enjoy the heat. Over time, my tolerance has risen, too, to the point that food that many people find spicy is too bland to be fully enjoyable for me, even if the taste is really good. A local Mexican restaurant my wife really likes has salsa which is absolutely delicious, but leaves me unsatisfied because it's just not hot enough for full enjoyment. I've seriously considered taking something along to spice it up, hopefully without altering the flavor.

      Of course, there are many people who don't like the burn for its own sake, and merely tolerate it in exchange for the flavor. And there are others who dislike the heat so much that they're unwilling to suffer it no matter how good the food tastes... or more accurately are so distracted by the burn that they can't actually taste the food at all. But none of these attitudes is wrong, much less idiotic as you say. People are different and have different tastes. That's a good thing.

  • by ildon (413912)

    Who the hell actually knows the SHU of the food they eat? I just don't like things that are so spicy I can no longer taste the flavor of the food I'm eating.

    • People who are obsessed with peppers and hot sauce are usually vaguely aware of the Scoville scale and where their favorite peppers land in relation to it.
  • As a student I was invited to a dinner with friends. One of them would cook, and she had bought fresh peppers at the market. She lived in an appartment. While cooking, we fled to the balcony because we couldn't stand it. It was almost impossible to eat the dish. For every bite, I needed one glass of water, and after half a plate I gave up.

    Today I don't mind eating a tea spoon of Sambal Ulek in one go, with a glass of water closeby, but I don't think that comes close to that dish.

    • That's why I hate spicy/"hot" food. It's like the people who eat those are trying to show off they're better than you, when in fact their tastebuds are all but dead.

      • If I'm going to eat something spicy, it's not to show off; I'll eat it because the flavor is richer than the same food made mildly. A lot of curries have a kick to them, but also some of my favorite flavors. Same thing with Mexican food. I'm sure that some people are like you're saying, but for the most part, that's not it.
    • Never drink water! (Score:4, Informative)

      by DaveAtFraud (460127) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @02:30PM (#46576107) Homepage Journal

      Water is one of the WORST things you can have if you find food to be too hot. Capsaician is an oily substance (long carbon chain). By drinking water you spread the oil and that makes it seem even hotten. Best slternatives are things that absorb the capsaician such as starcy foods like bread, rice or potatoes or acidic beverages like fruit juices, beer, etc. that disolve the oil. I've heard milk also works but somehow milk and spicy food doesn't sound good to me.

      One of the things that makes hot "buffalo wings" so hot is chicken wings are fatty so the fat from the chicken wings coats your mouth and holds the capsaician there. I like hot spicy food but found that out the hard way when I tried the hottest wings on the menu at a Buffalo Wild Wings. Tasted good initially but then the heat just stayed in my mouth. Only time I haven't been able to finish something because it was too hot.

      Cheers,
      Dave

      • by rvw (755107)

        Thanks! That was 25 years ago. I tried beer since then, but that doesn't work for me. I don't drink milk anymore, and if I still would I wouldn't like it with spicy food. What really works well for me is apple juice.

  • Don't know about anyone else, but some sources of spiciness can be 'hotter' than others for me and be OK, while others can be less so but send me looking desperately for a way to counteract their effect.
  • I grew curious about Sriracha sauce after seeing it mentioned in several places, so I bought some a few weeks back after trying the Sriracha sauce on a Subway sub.

    My wife & I have been getting Smart Ones because a) they're cheap and b) we're trying to lose weight. The big down side is that they are pretty bland for the most part, so I've been dousing them with Sriracha.

    It's nice & spicy, without being overwhelming. The other thing I like about it is that it's not runny like other hot sauces. It has

  • 3,000,000 units (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @12:23PM (#46574765) Homepage

    when you hit that number, you change. Suddenly you can eat Habeneros like candy, you can tell something is spicy, but it doesn't affect you anymore.

    The holy Ghost pepper will build a tolerance that makes people look at you like you are insane. I put a lot of "Daves Insanity Sauce" on a hotdog as a bet at a restaurant, the owner did not believe that I ate the whole thing without breaking a sweat, so I offered that he taste some of what dripped off on the plate.

    He about crapped himself with the heat.

    Granted you cant be stupid with insanely spicy, you can cause problems if you eat a large enough quantity.

    • I prefer the Dave's Ghost Pepper sauce or Scorpion Pepper sauce. The Scorpion Pepper sauce is supposedly hotter but it doesn't contain the hot pepper extract that the Ghost Pepper one does. Both pack a punch if you are not expecting it. Although at these levels you are only a little shy of just using police pepper spray.
  • My tolerance for doing the pepper challenge goes down. Not that I think they're any hotter, more like I have less to prove.

    Now I don't eat much hotter than a jalapeno. I've done the ass-in-the-tub sauce type stuff before and now I'd just rather not have the heartburn.

  • which is Bhut Jolokia chili pepper (Ghost pepper). It's spicy, but had no idea it's that high on the chart.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

  • by ackthpt (218170) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @03:03PM (#46576483) Homepage Journal

    I use them in cooking and making pickles. Generally I use milder stuff when making stuff to share, but some people have a heat tolerance. I scarcely notice jalapenos in anything now, so my heat tolerance is kinda skewed.

    Fortunately I moved to an area where you get what you ask for when ordering HOT in restaurants. When I lived in the midwest I usually said, "flaming hot, spouts of lava, searingly painful" and they'd obediently bob their heads and then bring me something about as hot as ketchup. I refer to this as "midwestern hot". I think these restaurants have been bitten by the town braggarts who said they could eat anything really HOT and then threatened to sue the establishment for poisoning them with a single Thai Dragon. (I eat those like candy when they are in my dish) So they tend to take into account prior experience and only serve mild.

    Growing them is often fun, but watch out for birds, which will rob your chili bed as they like the seeds.

    • That drives me up the wall. When i order something hot and say something really hot. And they bring me ketchup. I tend not to visit those restaurants again or if the food was good mention my dislike for their idea of hot. I fixed all that by going to restaurants with menus not available in english.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      "Growing them is often fun, but watch out for birds, which will rob your chili bed as they like the seeds."

      There's a reason for that: peppers evolved the production of capsaicin to encourage birds to eat the fruits and discourage mammals from doing so.
      Birds don't have the receptor that capsaicin stimulates, so they don't feel the heat/pain of the pepper. The mammalian digestive tract destroys the
      seeds of the plant, so they are poor vectors for seed distribution. On the other hand, bird digestive tracts p

  • Rule #1 (Score:4, Insightful)

    by jklovanc (1603149) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @03:44PM (#46576885)

    Eating food should not be a painful experience.

    Sure I could "build up my tolerance" but I am not willing to go through the pain to do it. There are plenty of non-painful foods to please my pallet. I have nothing to prove by the spice level of my food.

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      Eating food should not be a painful experience.

      Sure I could "build up my tolerance" but I am not willing to go through the pain to do it. There are plenty of non-painful foods to please my pallet. I have nothing to prove by the spice level of my food.

      Purely a matter of taste. Some of us like a little bite in our food. For me it became tolerance at a low level, so I upped the heat. Became accustomed to that. Now I'm accustomed to quite a bit of it. I eat curries a lot and prefer them to be fiery.

      For lunch I usually make a Thai-inspired curry soup in the employee breakroom, which has an actual range and refridgerator -- why go out for expensive ordinary when you can whip up a lunch to your tastes on a fraction (and save all that $$ for more toys) To

      • That is the problem with liking food with a bit kick and eating it frequently. When I was little I remember thinking how hot a jalapeno was the first time I had it because it burned so much. Now about 30 years later even something like a scorpion pepper doesn't burn like that first jalapeno did.
        • Yup, get into a bad habit of eating nachos with jalapenos regularly, and suddenly you're climbing the scale of heat without trying. It doesn't even take effort.
  • by Slartibartfast (3395) <<ken> <at> <jots.org>> on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @04:04PM (#46577091) Homepage Journal

    I'd been known as the guy who liked spicy food in my group. One day I came in, and there was a pepper sitting at my desk. One of those bonnet ones, though I didn't know that until I found it on Wikipedia. Anyway, I started nibbling it lightly, and it was sweet with a bit of spice. Then I ate the whole thing, and, yes, it was pretty darn hot. I wasn't dying, but it was definitely hot enough to make me sit up and take note. And, yes, my eyes began to tear.

    So I wiped them. With the hand I'd been holding the pepper with.

    Any semblance of nonchalance immediately left the building as I writhed in pain while simultaneously running for the sink to wash them out. Screw the burnt *finger* teaching best...

    • by ausekilis (1513635) on Thursday March 27, 2014 @04:29PM (#46595947)
      Oblig: [funnyandjokes.com] Chili Tester
      Notes From An Inexperienced Chili Taster Named FRANK, who was visiting Texas from the East Coast:

      “Recently I was honored to be selected as an outstanding Famous celebrity in Texas, to be a judge at a chili cook-off, because no one else wanted to do it. Also the original person called in sick at the last moment, and I happened to be standing there at the judge’s table asking directions to the beer wagon when the call came. I was assured by the other two judges (Native Texans) that the chili wouldn’t be all that spicy, and besides they told me I could have free beer during the tasting, so I accepted.

      Here are the scorecards from the event:

      Chili # 1: Mike’s Maniac Mobster Monster Chili
      JUDGE ONE: A little too heavy on tomato. Amusing kick.
      JUDGE TWO: Nice, smooth tomato flavor. Very mild.
      FRANK: Holy shit, what the hell is this stuff? You could remove dried paint from your driveway with it. Took me two beers to put the flames out. Hope that’s the worst one. These Texans are crazy.

      Chili # 2: Arthur’s Afterburner Chili
      JUDGE ONE: Smoky, with a hint of pork. Slight Jalapeno tang.
      JUDGE TWO: Exciting BBQ flavor, needs more peppers to be taken seriously.
      FRANK: Keep this out of reach of children! I’m not sure what I am supposed to taste besides pain. I had to wave off two people who wanted to give me the Heimlich maneuver. They had to walkie-talkie in 3 extra beers when they saw the look on my face.

      Chili # 3: Fred’s Famous Burn Down the Barn Chili
      JUDGE ONE: Excellent firehouse chili! Great kick. Needs more beans.
      JUDGE TWO: A beanless chili, a bit salty, good use of red peppers.
      FRANK: Call the EPA, I’ve located a uranium spill. My nose feels like I have been snorting Drano. Everyone knows the routine by now. Barmaid pounded me on the back; now my backbone is in the front part of my chest. I’m getting shit-faced.

      Chili # 4: Bubba’s Black Magic
      JUDGE ONE: Black bean chili with almost no spice. Disappointing.
      JUDGE TWO: Hint of lime in the black beans. Good side dish for fish or other mild foods, not much of a chili.
      FRANK: I felt something scraping across my tongue, but was unable to taste it. Sally, the bar maid, was standing behind me with fresh refills; that 300lb. bitch is starting to look HOT, just like this nuclear-waste I’m eating.

      Chili # 5: Linda’s Legal Lip Remover
      JUDGE ONE: Meaty, strong chili. Cayenne peppers freshly ground, adding considerable kick. Very impressive.
      JUDGE TWO: Chili using shredded beef; could use more tomato. Must admit the cayenne peppers make a strong statement.
      FRANK: My ears are ringing, and I can no longer focus my eyes. I farted and four people behind me needed paramedics. The contestant seemed offended when I told her that her chili had given me brain damage. Sally saved my tongue from bleeding by pouring beer directly on it from a pitcher. It really pisses me off that the other judges asked me to stop screaming. @#ck those rednecks!

      Chili # 6: Vera’s Very Vegetarian Variety
      JUDGE ONE: Thin yet bold vegetarian variety chili. Good balance of spice and peppers.
      JUDGE TWO: The best yet. Aggressive use of peppers, onions, and garlic. Superb.
      FRANK: My intestines are now a straight pipe filled with gaseous, sulfuric flames. No one seems inclined to stand behind me except that slut Sally. I need to wipe my ass with a snow cone!

      Chili # 7: Susan’s Screaming Sensation Chili
      JUDGE ONE: A mediocre chili with too much reliance on canned peppers.
      JUDGE TWO: Ho Hum, tastes as if the chef literally threw in a can of chili peppers at the last moment. I should note that I am worried about Judge Number 3. He appears to be in a bit of distress as he is cursing uncontrollably.
      FRANK: You could put a @?%#ing grenade in my mouth, pull the $#@!ing pin, and I wouldn
  • But when the pepper oil comes out the other end. There's no quenching that fire.

  • by Kittenman (971447) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @05:23PM (#46577875)
    Interesting how you have to go in training ... as a young man I used to enjoy a curry in North London. Worked my way through the vindaloo, through the tindaloo and onto the meat phal (not on the menu). All good for my digestion.

    Then I emigrated from London, went to a country where indian food wasn't as widespread. My palate changed, and now, some twenty years later I can't handle much more than a butter chicken.

    Regrets? I've had a few. But then again, too few to mention...
  • My go-to pepper of choice are those little thai "laser" peppers, preferably grown myself. Picked right off the plant they have a lot of flavor and weigh in somewhere between 30000 and 50000 IIRC. Anything much lower than that is below my pain threshold. Anyone notice the rise of what I like to call the "death jalepino"? Every so often you'll get a jalepino that's hotter than any habenero I've ever tried. I got one a while back while making chili and when I cut into it, I and a couple other people in the r
  • My partner and I are very fond of super spicy food, but we've backed it off as we're getting older. The backside doesn't cope so well these days :)

    Anyway, here's a simple drink we invented for those who really love the sting of a hot chilli:
    Jalapaccini (pronounced Hal-a-pa-chee-nee)
    1 nip of vodka
    1 nip of dry vermouth
    1 piece of your favourite chilli (not the full chilli, just a piece about the size of an olive)
    Its just like a dry martini - but hot!
    In the first 5 minutes, the sting isn't fully relea
  • C'mon. Standard grocery store habaneros are hot, but by no means "ludicrous". Just be careful with how much you use in a dish. They add a nice sweetness and flourish of color to your food. Personally, I would have reserved the term "ludicrous" for peppers over 500,000... at that range, they have little use aside from macho named sauces or use as an anti-personal weapon.

  • by sadness203 (1539377) on Tuesday March 25, 2014 @09:19PM (#46580107)
    ...Sprayed on protestors. ;)
  • At 100k units you are barely even getting into hot territory. For most people I'd classify the list as:
    Bell Pepper
    Jalapeno
    Serrano
    Habanero
    350k-800k (Most of your 'hots', brain strains, 7-pot, that sort of stuff)
    800k-1m (Bhut Jalokia and other 'superhots')
    1m+ (Trinidad Moruga Scorpions and other record holders)

    • Meh... I don't think that list does each variety justice. If you consider the garbage they bred the heat out of specifically to sell off to the masses as "jalapeno" peppers, then yeah... it's not much hotter than a banana pepper, so your positioning of it right after the bell pepper is accurate. However... if you consider some of the untamed, real deal, original varieties, the heat is surprising. I've had some Jalapeno M peppers that blew the shit out of anything labeled "Serrano" or even "Cayenne" that

  • The hotter the better, and preferably of the C. chinense species, of practically any color (except unripe/green). There are some decent C. baccatum varieties though and Rocotos are pretty good and unique. Not a fan of Tabasco peppers other than ground into powder, and most C. annuum varieties are for pussies. The Bhut Jolokia, Fatalli, Trinidad Scorpion and 7 Pod are all pretty damn good superhots.

  • by gatzke (2977) on Wednesday March 26, 2014 @05:27AM (#46582237) Homepage Journal

    Carolina Reaper from Pucker Butt. South Carolina has the verified hottest peppers in the world!

    1,600,000 SHU average with peaks of 2,200,000 SHU for the reaper. Jalapeno peppers are under 10,000 SHU.

    I bought some powder for a chili contest and it made my face go numb and tingly.

    http://puckerbuttpeppercompany... [puckerbutt...ompany.com]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C... [wikipedia.org]

  • A lot of taste can be gained with bell peppers, so those are the most used in my kitchen. I love their taste so I use a lot of them. If I were to use common supermarket peppers in the same amounts (dunno what they are on the scoville scale, neither do I know their exact name) I'd breath fire.
    I like spicy stuff, I am able to handle a spoonful of normal Dutch supermarket sambal. However I do not like to use peppers that only add spiciness. Spiciness is boring. The taste of good peppers is where the fun is. Th

  • I voted for the way I like to eat them raw. But I want a big range when I'm cooking depending what's cooking and who it's for.

  • by blcamp (211756) on Wednesday March 26, 2014 @10:38AM (#46583933) Homepage

    ...usually comes out, too.

    The "spiciness" of chiles normally has to be dealt with... TWICE.

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

 



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