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What computing device do you use most while on vacation?

Displaying poll results.
Desktop
  927 votes / 5%
Laptop
  4054 votes / 24%
Tablet
  2732 votes / 16%
Smartphone
  5805 votes / 34%
E-Reader
  570 votes / 3%
Game console
163 votes / 0%
I stay away from electronics on vacation
  1837 votes / 10%
I'm Amish, you insensitive clod!
  698 votes / 4%
16786 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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What computing device do you use most while on vacation?

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  • Netbook (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @05:25PM (#45783935)

    My 2008 Acer Aspire One netbook still serves me fine. A bit more performance would be nice at times, but apparently "small, affordable, with keyboard, runs Windows" is not something the market is all too interested in.

  • Re:Obligatory (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 25, 2013 @05:47PM (#45784037)

    I sit at a computer 9 hours a day working - not just the normal "email and Excel" type stuff, but maintaining web servers, so I don't think I qualify as Amish. What that means for my vacation is that I'm going to spend all of my time looking at *anything* but a screen. I find it more fulfilling to experience the landscape and culture of the place I'm visiting instead of staying plugged in to the same Matrix I already spend the other 99% of my life in.
     
    Another interesting note might be that a few years ago my power was knocked out for 2 solid weeks after a hurricane. Although I really missed the power for certain things like air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, etc - computers/internet were not on that list. For a day I thought I missed them, then I started to enjoy the breather. Being outside, walking, reading on a swing, smoking a few joints... it was actually a very nice two weeks with zero internet.

  • Re:Obligatory (Score:4, Interesting)

    by multimediavt (965608) on Thursday December 26, 2013 @12:47AM (#45786095)

    I sit at a computer 9 hours a day working - not just the normal "email and Excel" type stuff, but maintaining web servers, so I don't think I qualify as Amish. What that means for my vacation is that I'm going to spend all of my time looking at *anything* but a screen. I find it more fulfilling to experience the landscape and culture of the place I'm visiting instead of staying plugged in to the same Matrix I already spend the other 99% of my life in.

    Having only 9 hour days would *BE* a vacation for me.

  • Re:Obligatory (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Jason Levine (196982) on Thursday December 26, 2013 @11:32AM (#45788143)

    Once a week, I observe Shabbat by not using my computers or smartphone (except in case of emergency). It's partly religious observance, but if I'm really being honest it's mostly a time to force myself to unplug, spend time with my family, and not become a work-a-holic. There are times (especially when things slow down) that I feel the urge to whip out the old smartphone and check Twitter, but I resist and enjoy the time offline.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 26, 2013 @05:52PM (#45791251)

    Gunkholing [wikipedia.org]

  • Re:Obligatory (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DexterIsADog (2954149) on Friday December 27, 2013 @11:21AM (#45796771)

    I sit at a computer 9 hours a day working - not just the normal "email and Excel" type stuff, but maintaining web servers, so I don't think I qualify as Amish. What that means for my vacation is that I'm going to spend all of my time looking at *anything* but a screen. I find it more fulfilling to experience the landscape and culture of the place I'm visiting instead of staying plugged in to the same Matrix I already spend the other 99% of my life in.

    Having only 9 hour days would *BE* a vacation for me.

    Since the tone of your post sounds like you don't love working more than 9 hours a day, you need to reexamine your career choices. Why do you put up with it? I don't work more than 8 hours/day normally, and only go to 10 or so hours when there's an actual business need. And I make sure the people who report to me don't get stuck in that trap of permanent emergency either.

The only problem with being a man of leisure is that you can never stop and take a rest.

 



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